User Tag List

12 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 14

  1. #1
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default Ever wonder: weight of the whole Internet?

    "To see the world in a grain of sand..." - Blake

    Another article from Discover magazine, it was a fun read:

    How much does the Internet weigh?

    Beginning and end of article, copied and pasted -

    How heavy is information? Most of us know that computers represent all types of information—e-mails, documents, video clips, Web pages, everything—as streams of binary digits, 1s and 0s. These digits are mathematical entities, but they are also tangible ones: They are embodied and manipulated as voltages in electronic circuits. Therefore, every bit of data must have some mass, albeit minuscule. This prompted DISCOVER to ask the question: How much would all the data sent through the Internet on an average day weigh?

    In searching for an answer, we scanned technical databases, tore through reference books, Googled like crazy, and checked with experts. It soon became apparent that if we wanted an answer, we were going to have to work it out for ourselves, as no one else appears to have tackled this question before*. So we put our thinking caps on and set the coffee machine on extra strong.

    The key to figuring out the weight of the Internet relies on understanding the essential process that controls all the information passing through it, whether you are talking about an e-mail being sent across the street or a video feed from a Webcam on the other side of the world. In order to travel across the Internet, information is broken down into packets—little gobbets of data ranging from a few dozen to over a thousand bytes in size. As well as the information being transmitted, the packet also contains addressing details that routers—computers dedicated to moving data around—use to determine where the packets should go.
    [...]
    But that’s just one e-mail. How much information—all the Web pages, instant messages, video streams, and everything else you can imagine—passes through the Internet as a whole? Not an easy number to track down, but finally we got our answer from Clifford Holliday, author of Internet Growth 2006 (published by the telecommunications consultancy Information Gatekeepers). He estimates the total amount of Internet traffic by looking at the activity of end-user connections, such as dial-up modem lines, DSL, and fiber-optic connections. Broadband connections to homes and businesses, like DSL and cable modems, are responsible for generating most of the load, which also goes a long way toward Holliday’s discovery that 75 percent of all traffic on the Internet is due to file sharing, with 59 percent of that file sharing attributed to people swapping video files. Music tracks account for 33 percent of the file-sharing traffic. E-mail, it turns out, accounts for just 9 percent of the total traffic. And that total is... a staggering 40 petabytes, or 40 x 1015 bytes: a 4 followed by 16 zeros.

    Taking Holliday’s 40-petabyte figure and plugging it into the same formula that we worked out for our 50-kilobyte e-mail results in a grand total of 1.3 x 10-8 pound. At last, after much scribbling (and perhaps a little cursing), we had our answer: The weight of the Internet adds up to just about 0.2 millionths of an ounce.

    Love letters, business contracts, holiday snaps, spam, petitions, emergency bulletins, pornography, wedding announcements, TV shows, news articles, vacation plans, home movies, press releases, celebrity Web pages, home movies, secrets of every stripe, military orders, music, newsletters, confessions, congratulations—every shade and aspect of human life encoded as 1s and 0s. Taken together, they weigh roughly the same as the smallest possible sand grain, one measuring just two-*thousandths of an inch across.

    William Blake’s famous poem Auguries of Innocence (1803) begins, “To see a world in a grain of sand....” He was being more prophetic than he could have ever known.

  2. #2
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    A full hard disk is just as heavy as an empty harddisk. So the internet is weightless. :P

    Also, electricity is just elektrons bumping into each other transfering an attribute in laymans terms. There's no actual weight. No other particles come into existance, nor does the existing particles shift in weight.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  3. #3
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    A full hard disk is just as heavy as an empty harddisk. So the internet is weightless. :P

    Also, electricity is just elektrons bumping into each other transfering an attribute in laymans terms. There's no actual weight. No other particles come into existance, nor does the existing particles shift in weight.
    Way to ruin our fun for us!
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #4
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    SLI None
    Posts
    6,168

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    A full hard disk is just as heavy as an empty harddisk. So the internet is weightless. :P

    Also, electricity is just elektrons bumping into each other transfering an attribute in laymans terms. There's no actual weight. No other particles come into existance, nor does the existing particles shift in weight.
    Did you consider the weight of what carries the electrons? all the working routers
    It's like weighing a human naked or with clothes on

  5. #5
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    Did you consider the weight of what carries the electrons? all the working routers
    It's like weighing a human naked or with clothes on
    Hmm, suppose you are right about that one. The existance of routers is solely for the purpose of sending and retrieving information and can therefor be used in figuring out how much weight on the planet is needed for internet to exist and function.

    In that case though, all power requirements and hardware requirements should be considered. The percentage computers are used in order to maintain internet, servers, modems and internet adapters, all cables that are used for internet, even the weight of power plants to boot.

    Then again, wether these hardware sources exist in function of the internet or exist in raw material on our planet, it still doesn't affect the world's total weight. So in the grand scheme of things, internet is still weightless.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  6. #6
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    A full hard disk is just as heavy as an empty harddisk. So the internet is weightless. :P

    Also, electricity is just elektrons bumping into each other transfering an attribute in laymans terms. There's no actual weight. No other particles come into existance, nor does the existing particles shift in weight.
    From article:
    On average, about half of the bits will be 1s and half 0s, so that’s 204,800 1s that have to be stored, requiring a total of about 8 billion electrons. One electron weighs 2 x 10-30 pound, so a 50-kilobyte e-mail weighs about two ten-thousandths of a quadrillionth of an ounce, about the weight of 21,000 lead atoms. That may sound like a lot, but in fact it’s a tiny amount—an ounce of lead contains about 82 million quadrillion atoms.

  7. #7
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    SLI None
    Posts
    6,168

    Default

    I doubt the world's total weight would ever change unless we start shooting things up to space.

  8. #8
    Seriously Delirious Udog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    INfp
    Enneagram
    9w1 sp/sx
    Socionics
    INFp None
    Posts
    5,295

    Default

    10 pounds.

    If you remove the porn, 0.5 pounds.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Udog View Post
    10 pounds.

    If you remove the porn, 0.5 pounds.
    Udog logging off the net = -9.5pounds

  10. #10
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    From article:
    Yes but the electron existed already before the 'charge'. Electricity doesn't 'create' electrons. It uses already existing ones. So wether the email is in 'existance' or not. There is no 'weight difference'. :P
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

Similar Threads

  1. Depth Psychology: Psychology of the Whole
    By hacbad macbar in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-10-2014, 12:42 PM
  2. [MBTItm] Weight of the world
    By 2XtremeENFP in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 08-05-2013, 01:11 AM
  3. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-02-2010, 11:36 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-02-2010, 07:50 PM
  5. [NF] If you've ever wondered what a world of NFs would be like...
    By wwbeachbum161 in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-13-2008, 09:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO