User Tag List

12 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Nobel Prizes

  1. #1

    Default Nobel Prizes

    Seems like we would be neglectful if we didn't have a thread on the current happenings.

    Seems like there are rather many prizes this year for discoveries further back in history. Though that is just my impression.

    Nobelprize.org

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2007
    "for their discoveries of principles for introducing specific gene modifications in mice by the use of embryonic stem cells"
    Mario R. Capecchi - USA
    Sir Martin J. Evans - UK
    Oliver Smithies- USA

    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2007
    "for the discovery of Giant Magnetoresistance"
    Albert Fert - France
    Peter Grünberg - Germany

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2007
    Gerhard Ertl - Germany

    The EU is dominating. Is the U.S. no longer on the cutting-edge? ( )
    Last edited by ygolo; 10-10-2007 at 07:47 PM. Reason: To spur some more interest

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  2. #2

    Default My favorite category is physics

    A freind of mine had at one time read all the Nobel papers in Physics and Economics.

    All Nobel Laureates in Physics

    2007 - Albert Fert, Peter Grünberg
    2006 - John C. Mather, George F. Smoot
    2005 - Roy J. Glauber, John L. Hall, Theodor W. Hänsch
    2004 - David J. Gross, H. David Politzer, Frank Wilczek
    2003 - Alexei A. Abrikosov, Vitaly L. Ginzburg, Anthony J. Leggett
    2002 - Raymond Davis Jr., Masatoshi Koshiba, Riccardo Giacconi
    2001 - Eric A. Cornell, Wolfgang Ketterle, Carl E. Wieman
    2000 - Zhores I. Alferov, Herbert Kroemer, Jack S. Kilby
    1999 - Gerardus 't Hooft, Martinus J.G. Veltman
    1998 - Robert B. Laughlin, Horst L. Störmer, Daniel C. Tsui
    1997 - Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, William D. Phillips
    1996 - David M. Lee, Douglas D. Osheroff, Robert C. Richardson
    1995 - Martin L. Perl, Frederick Reines
    1994 - Bertram N. Brockhouse, Clifford G. Shull
    1993 - Russell A. Hulse, Joseph H. Taylor Jr.
    1992 - Georges Charpak
    1991 - Pierre-Gilles de Gennes
    1990 - Jerome I. Friedman, Henry W. Kendall, Richard E. Taylor
    1989 - Norman F. Ramsey, Hans G. Dehmelt, Wolfgang Paul
    1988 - Leon M. Lederman, Melvin Schwartz, Jack Steinberger
    1987 - J. Georg Bednorz, K. Alex Müller
    1986 - Ernst Ruska, Gerd Binnig, Heinrich Rohrer
    1985 - Klaus von Klitzing
    1984 - Carlo Rubbia, Simon van der Meer
    1983 - Subramanyan Chandrasekhar, William A. Fowler
    1982 - Kenneth G. Wilson
    1981 - Nicolaas Bloembergen, Arthur L. Schawlow, Kai M. Siegbahn
    1980 - James Cronin, Val Fitch
    1979 - Sheldon Glashow, Abdus Salam, Steven Weinberg
    1978 - Pyotr Kapitsa, Arno Penzias, Robert Woodrow Wilson
    1977 - Philip W. Anderson, Sir Nevill F. Mott, John H. van Vleck
    1976 - Burton Richter, Samuel C.C. Ting
    1975 - Aage N. Bohr, Ben R. Mottelson, James Rainwater
    1974 - Martin Ryle, Antony Hewish
    1973 - Leo Esaki, Ivar Giaever, Brian D. Josephson
    1972 - John Bardeen, Leon N. Cooper, Robert Schrieffer
    1971 - Dennis Gabor
    1970 - Hannes Alfvén, Louis Néel
    1969 - Murray Gell-Mann
    1968 - Luis Alvarez
    1967 - Hans Bethe
    1966 - Alfred Kastler
    1965 - Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, Julian Schwinger, Richard P. Feynman
    1964 - Charles H. Townes, Nicolay G. Basov, Aleksandr M. Prokhorov
    1963 - Eugene Wigner, Maria Goeppert-Mayer, J. Hans D. Jensen
    1962 - Lev Landau
    1961 - Robert Hofstadter, Rudolf Mössbauer
    1960 - Donald A. Glaser
    1959 - Emilio Segrè, Owen Chamberlain
    1958 - Pavel A. Cherenkov, Il´ja M. Frank, Igor Y. Tamm
    1957 - Chen Ning Yang, Tsung-Dao Lee
    1956 - William B. Shockley, John Bardeen, Walter H. Brattain
    1955 - Willis E. Lamb, Polykarp Kusch
    1954 - Max Born, Walther Bothe
    1953 - Frits Zernike
    1952 - Felix Bloch, E. M. Purcell
    1951 - John Cockcroft, Ernest T.S. Walton
    1950 - Cecil Powell
    1949 - Hideki Yukawa
    1948 - Patrick M.S. Blackett
    1947 - Edward V. Appleton
    1946 - Percy W. Bridgman
    1945 - Wolfgang Pauli
    1944 - Isidor Isaac Rabi
    1943 - Otto Stern
    1942 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
    1941 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
    1940 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
    1939 - Ernest Lawrence
    1938 - Enrico Fermi
    1937 - Clinton Davisson, George Paget Thomson
    1936 - Victor F. Hess, Carl D. Anderson
    1935 - James Chadwick
    1934 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
    1933 - Erwin Schrödinger, Paul A.M. Dirac
    1932 - Werner Heisenberg
    1931 - The prize money was allocated to the Special Fund of this prize section
    1930 - Venkata Raman
    1929 - Louis de Broglie
    1928 - Owen Willans Richardson
    1927 - Arthur H. Compton, C.T.R. Wilson
    1926 - Jean Baptiste Perrin
    1925 - James Franck, Gustav Hertz
    1924 - Manne Siegbahn
    1923 - Robert A. Millikan
    1922 - Niels Bohr
    1921 - Albert Einstein
    1920 - Charles Edouard Guillaume
    1919 - Johannes Stark
    1918 - Max Planck
    1917 - Charles Glover Barkla
    1916 - The prize money was allocated to the Special Fund of this prize section
    1915 - William Bragg, Lawrence Bragg
    1914 - Max von Laue
    1913 - Heike Kamerlingh Onnes
    1912 - Gustaf Dalén
    1911 - Wilhelm Wien
    1910 - Johannes Diderik van der Waals
    1909 - Guglielmo Marconi, Ferdinand Braun
    1908 - Gabriel Lippmann
    1907 - Albert A. Michelson
    1906 - J.J. Thomson
    1905 - Philipp Lenard
    1904 - Lord Rayleigh
    1903 - Henri Becquerel, Pierre Curie, Marie Curie
    1902 - Hendrik A. Lorentz, Pieter Zeeman
    1901 - Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  3. #3
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    8,828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2007
    "for the discovery of Giant Magnetoresistance"
    Albert Fert - France
    Peter Grünberg - Germany
    What's giant magnetoresistance? I've never heard of it.

    The EU is dominating. Is the U.S. no longer on the cutting-edge? ( )
    I think it's related to the culture. There seems to be a movement in popular culture making people more focused on the moment, and less interested in education or the future. Educating them has forced us to focus only on the basics, and drilling them in as well as possible via the most repetitive, basic methods possible, because they all have such short attention spans. If I knew only what I had learned in school, and had never supplemented it with research out of sheer curiosity, I might be less than well-informed on a number of issues, if you know what I mean. If the people with more potential and interest were the only ones allowed to learn, then the instructional methods could be designed such that they got the most out of the course, but the compulsory education system and public praise based simply on the number of students passing forces lower standards. It's a sad case of quantity over quality.

    Sorry if I sound judgmental, it's just so worrying. Why do I so often worry about things I can't control? It's like a bad habit of mine.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by athenian200 View Post
    What's giant magnetoresistance? I've never heard of it.
    Think hard drives.

    Quote Originally Posted by athenian200 View Post
    I think it's related to the culture. There seems to be a movement in popular culture making people more focused on the moment, and less interested in education or the future. Educating them has forced us to focus only on the basics, and drilling them in as well as possible via the most repetitive, basic methods possible, because they all have such short attention spans. If I knew only what I had learned in school, and had never supplemented it with research out of sheer curiosity, I might be less than well-informed on a number of issues, if you know what I mean. If the people with more potential and interest were the only ones allowed to learn, then the instructional methods could be designed such that they got the most out of the course, but the compulsory education system and public praise based simply on the number of students passing forces lower standards. It's a sad case of quantity over quality.

    Sorry if I sound judgmental, it's just so worrying. Why do I so often worry about things I can't control? It's like a bad habit of mine.
    I personally think the U.S. public education system worked well for me. But I haven't been in school recently, so you may be relating the typical experience.

    I have noted a dip in intellectual aims of the country as a whole in recent years. I am not sure what to make of it. I think the points made in Anti-Intellectualism in American Life is still very relevant.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  5. #5
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    Seems like we would be neglectful if we didn't have a thread on the current happenings.

    Seems like there are rather many prizes this year for discoveries further back in history. Though that is just my impression.

    Nobelprize.org

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2007
    "for their discoveries of principles for introducing specific gene modifications in mice by the use of embryonic stem cells"
    Mario R. Capecchi - USA
    Sir Martin J. Evans - UK
    Oliver Smithies- USA

    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2007
    "for the discovery of Giant Magnetoresistance"
    Albert Fert - France
    Peter Grünberg - Germany

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2007
    Gerhard Ertl - Germany

    The EU is dominating. Is the U.S. no longer on the cutting-edge? ( )
    You accepted a number of Jews to build the bomb.
    Hence the prices.

    You have got the bomb.
    No prices.

  6. #6
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    8,828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    I personally think the U.S. public education system worked well for me. But I haven't been in school recently, so you may be relating the typical experience.

    I have noted a dip in intellectual aims of the country as a whole in recent years. I am not sure what to make of it. I think the points made in Anti-Intellectualism in American Life is still very relevant.
    Yes. It's so frustrating, too. I mean, I'm just an NF, and disturbingly enough, I end up knowing more than most of the people around me, sometimes even teachers. It's very frightening, because I don't feel as though I've worked at being or even wanted to be intelligent, but that I've just happened to pick all of this up. I mean, I'm not that intelligent, but I still know more than many of the people around me, which must mean they're exceptionally dense. It makes me feel panicked that the government, technology, and military are going to fall apart because soon no one will be knowledgeable enough about how anything works to keep things going.

    I'm just worried... and scared.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    You accepted a number of Jews to build the bomb.
    Hence the prices.

    You have got the bomb.
    No prices.
    Sad, but there is a lot of truth in what you say. We then had the cold-war which spured us again.

    A lot of the robotics technology tha came out recently was due to the war on terror.

    Hate, greed, and dogmatism seems to fund our research. I think it is testiment to the pursuit-of-truth in bearing good fruit with such poisoned water.

    Quote Originally Posted by athenian200 View Post
    Yes. It's so frustrating, too. I mean, I'm just an NF, and disturbingly enough, I end up knowing more than most of the people around me, sometimes even teachers. It's very frightening, because I don't feel as though I've worked at being or even wanted to be intelligent, but that I've just happened to pick all of this up. I mean, I'm not that intelligent, but I still know more than many of the people around me, which must mean they're exceptionally dense. It makes me feel panicked that the government, technology, and military are going to fall apart because soon no one will be knowledgeable enough about how anything works to keep things going.

    I'm just worried... and scared.
    I blame Anti-Intellectualism as the root cause for lack of U.S. competitiveness in recent years in Science and Technology.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  8. #8

    Default With all our National News we neglected to mention these

    http://nobelprize.org/lists/all/

    2008 - Chemistry, Martin Chalfie
    Chemistry, Osamu Shimomura
    Chemistry, Roger Y. Tsien
    Economics, Paul Krugman
    Literature, Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio
    Medicine, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi
    Medicine, Luc Montagnier
    Medicine, Harald zur Hausen
    Peace, Martti Ahtisaari
    Physics, Makoto Kobayashi
    Physics, Toshihide Maskawa
    Physics, Yoichiro Nambu
    Thoughts?

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  9. #9
    Senior Member animenagai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    NeFi
    Enneagram
    4w3
    Posts
    1,573

    Default

    i should really know this, but i wonder if philosophers get nobel prizes for their philosophy. would it be under literature?

  10. #10

    Default It's Nobel Prize time again

    Press Release - Announcements of the 2009 Nobel Prizes

    Monday, October 5
    11:30 a.m. at the earliest The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
    The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet, Wallenbergsalen, Nobel Forum, Nobels väg 1, Stockholm

    Tuesday, October 6
    11:45 a.m. at the earliest The Nobel Prize in Physics
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sessionssalen, Lilla Frescativägen 4A, Stockholm

    Wednesday, October 7
    11:45 a.m. at the earliest The Nobel Prize in Chemistry
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sessionssalen, Lilla Frescativägen 4A, Stockholm

    Friday, October 9
    11:00 a.m. The Nobel Peace Prize
    The Norwegian Nobel Committee, The Norwegian Nobel Institute, Store Sal, Henrik Ibsens gate 51, Oslo

    Monday, October 12
    1:00 p.m. at the earliest The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sessionssalen, Lilla Frescativägen 4A, Stockholm
    I wonder why the Literature announcement isn't there (apparently it's on the 9th).

    Medicine 2009
    "for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase"
    Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider, Jack W. Szostak

    Physics 2009
    "for groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication"
    Charles K. Kao
    "for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor"
    Willard S. Boyle, George E. Smith

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

Similar Threads

  1. There is no Economics Nobel Prize
    By SearchingforPeace in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-16-2017, 08:21 AM
  2. Nobel Prize Economist Says American Inequality Didn’t Just Happen. It Was Created.
    By Olm the Water King in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 03-15-2016, 08:37 PM
  3. Obama wins Nobel Peace prize...
    By Magic Poriferan in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 127
    Last Post: 10-19-2009, 03:20 PM
  4. Was it “politically expedient” for Obama to “accept” the Nobel Peace Prize
    By Vizconde in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 169
    Last Post: 10-13-2009, 05:28 PM
  5. Nobel Peace Prize: A world sigh of relief?
    By coberst in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 10-11-2009, 02:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO