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  1. #11
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lasting_Pain View Post
    So I can become the Hulk if exposed to Anti-Matter?
    Theoretically, if your cells could survive being inundated with the radiation, and your DNA underwent a rare mutation that would mimic this change, it is possible. But abysmally unlikely. You'd have a better chance of winning the lottery every day for the rest of your life.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post
    So, on this same tangent, what's the difference between antimatter and dark energy / dark matter? I've never really understood the distinction.. is it a possibility that they're the same thing? If so, then inter-galactic travel would be impossible, since the idea is that dark energy holds the universe together.. we'd explode.

    That's sad if its true
    Antimatter and Dark Energy/Matter are not the same. In theory if Dark Matter were to be found, it would also have an antidark matter particle. It is theorized to be a heavy particle, and also an abundant one, as it is supposed to consist of 22% of the universe. Dark Energy is often attributed to be the cause of the universe's increasing rate of expansion, and accounts for 74% of the energy density of the universe. All the stars, galaxies, and light we see from the entire universe makes up 4% of our universe. It is called "dark" because it makes no electromagnetic interaction, nor does it seem to make a strong and weak force interaction, with other particles and energy. It only has gravitational effects.
    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post

    One glib answer is that if there were equal amounts of matter and anti-matter, they would keep annahialating each other, and then we wouldn't be around to ask the question (nor continue to call the things we do encounter readily as matter, and their anti-particles as anti-matter). This is a very unsatisfying answer.
    Yes! I hate the anthropic principle, and all of its cousins, with an absolute passion. If we can't observe it, it doesn't seem like it should be there. There is something terribly wrong with gravity. Its stark contrast from the other 3 forces is something I cannot get over.



  2. #12
    Lasting_Pain
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    So was anti-matter wiped from existence when the big bang occurred?

  3. #13
    Shaman BlackCat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lasting_Pain View Post
    So was anti-matter wiped from existence when the big bang occurred?
    () 9w8-3w4-7w6 tritype.

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  4. #14
    Lasting_Pain
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackCat View Post
    Happy One Thousandth post Black Cat!

    I digress

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    The Picture is a lie.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Jeremy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    One glib answer is that if there were equal amounts of matter and anti-matter, they would keep annahialating each other, and then we wouldn't be around to ask the question (nor continue to call the things we do encounter readily as matter, and their anti-particles as anti-matter). This is a very unsatisfying answer.
    Hmm.. I'm not a physicist by any means (my spell checker had to spell it for me just now), but could it be that anti-matter is a part of regular matter, but undetectable until you get an imbalance of anti-matter and "normal" matter through certain reactions? And if there is too much anti-matter, it will destroy "normal" matter until the system reaches equilibrium again?

    Wow, random theory there. Get to it physicists. Thanks for the clarification of dark matter / energy.
    "Can you set me free from this dark inner world? Save me now, last beats in the soul.."

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  6. #16

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    Before the theory of antimatter was postulated, Dirac had theorized that we are infact awash in a sea of negative energy electrons that we cannot see. The Pauli exclusion principle would then explain why our normal electrons do not drop into the lower energy state (that state is filled).

    One of the implications of this theory is that once in a while the sea of invisible electrons can be excited enough to have one of the invisible electrons jump up to the energy state that we see that electron. When the electron jumps up in energy it will leave a "hole" in the see of electrons that has all the same properties of a positron.

    Interestingly, this is analogous to what happens in semiconductors. A valance band of electrons is mostly filled, while the conduction band only has a small number of electrons. When a valance band electron is excited with enough energy to jump to the conduction band, it leaves behind a "hole." These holes are what we circuit designers view as the charge carriers in p-channel transistors.

    I kinda like Dirac's idea (extended to all Fermions). What if we are awash in a sea of negative energy Fermions that we cannot see, and that "anti-mater" is comprised of "holes" in this sea when the negative energy Fermions are excited to the positive energy state?

    It's appealing to me in that it answers (possibly) two mysteries.

    1)Why isn't there equal amounts of matter and anti-matter? Because antimatter is only comprised of "holes" in energy bands that are usually filled.

    2)What is this "dark matter"? Perhaps it is the sea of Fermions that we cannot see in the negative energy states.

    Of course most practicing physicists know of Dirac's theory so there must be some reason it is not favoured now.

    There are a few things I can think that would make this theory unattractive.

    1) Perhaps there are some Bosons that have antiparticles that are not themselves (a photon is an anti-photon, for instance). The trouble with Bosons, is that they can be packed into the same energy level without restriction. So if there are negative energy states for these then, we would almost never encounter these Bosons (they would have to be excited to the positive level).

    2) There are quantum numbers for antiparticles that don't match the negative energy solutions.

    3) The hypothesis violates some other physical law.

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  7. #17
    Junior Member ProNeon's Avatar
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    In particle physics, antimatter is the extension of the concept of the antiparticle to matter, where antimatter is composed of antiparticles in the same way that normal matter is composed of particles. For example, an antielectron (a positron, an electron with a positive charge) and an antiproton (a proton with a negative charge) could form an antihydrogen atom in the same way that an electron and a proton form a normal matter hydrogen atom. Furthermore, mixing matter and antimatter would lead to the annihilation of both in the same way that mixing antiparticles and particles does, thus giving rise to high-energy photons (gamma rays) or other particle–antiparticle pairs.

    There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is apparently almost entirely matter, whether there exist other places that are almost entirely antimatter instead, and what might be possible if antimatter could be harnessed, but at this time the apparent asymmetry of matter and antimatter in the visible universe is one of the greatest unsolved problems in physics. The process by which this asymmetry between particles and antiparticles developed is called baryogenesis.
    Mathematical reasoning may be regarded rather schematically as the exercise of a combination of two facilities, which we may call intuition and ingenuity. - Alan Turing

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