User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 82

Thread: Why do we die?

  1. #31
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    8,193

    Default

    You know, I'm not really that concerned with death. Which has always gotten me funny looks. I had just wondered as to the evolutionary benefit and the initial irony of death being a survivability trait in groups.



  2. #32
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Posts
    6,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    I feel a great comfort in knowing that my body may potentially provide nutrients for a young blossoming tree to grow or a sustaining foraging animal's appetite for a time. Nevermind coffins. They simply affirm ones existence as apart rather than a part of continuity. I've taken from the earth and I want to give my nutrients to it.
    I'm just the opposite. I hope someone digs me up in a few hundred years and revives my corpse. Maybe I can terrorize a city or something.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  3. #33
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    8,193

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    I'm just the opposite. I hope someone digs me up in a few hundred years and revives my corpse. Maybe I can terrorize a city or something.
    I'm a big fan of superfreezing myself and blasting my coffin into space with a constantly updating encyclopedia. Maybe some aliens will pick me up and revive me. Then the fun experiments start!



  4. #34
    S Saiyan God Mace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    8 sx
    Socionics
    --- Te
    Posts
    2,141

    Default

    When we're dead, what would anything matter any way (to us) - even supposedly if (hopefully) our genes did pass on?

  5. #35
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    I heard this interesting phrase from an evolutionary psych prof when asked why we die (what is the evolutionary advantage of death).

    His response: evolution - it's all about: live fast, love hard, and die young.

    Competition. Either you use your energy to get bigger antlers, or, conserve energy, be mediocre and have longevity. Evolution adheres to the former. The 'fittest' of the species usually died the youngest, because they played it the hardest, which showed them at their 'fittest', which thus, helped be selected.
    Quote Originally Posted by persianness View Post
    Interesting.

    ... "I'd rather live a short life of glory, than a long life of ..." - Alexander the Great

    Thanks, that made me feel a little better about my life...
    I know this is a bit late in coming. I always remember all the stuff on my to-do/answer list but, a timeline of when I get around to it, is a whole another matter. Only guarantee with me - I will get around to it, without fail.

    ....eventually.

    But, here to hoping you still have some interest :

    We can start with an assumption of: trade off. There's always a trade off.

    Now, given the above....we can see some examples:

    a)In birds with ornate plumage.

    Do they have drab plumage and up their chance of not being that easily spotted by predators but down their chance of getting lucky?

    Competition (for sexual selection) drives this, at the within group/species level.

    Death doesn't win out as a motivator.

    b) Sexual size Dimorphism

    Do they trade in being bigger and more agile versus lower body mass (i.e., lower intake of energy, lower resources for sustainability at the level of individual self).

    Again, the latter loses out as motivator


    I guess it is that evolution drives the survival of the fittest within species, but, as a whole, drives survival of the species itself. So, sometimes, although it may seem counter-intuitive, it becomes about what of mine will remain the longest as a stamp in this world. What of mine will take the hardest/longest to die off, even at the cost of me dying myself; given our beginning assumption that there's always a trade-off.

  6. #36
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    xNFP
    Posts
    6,885

    Default

    Interesting question, I always wondered: Why don't we want to die?
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Interesting question, I always wondered: Why don't we want to die?
    Because we'd no longer be able to be.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Feops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    INTx
    Posts
    829

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Interesting question, I always wondered: Why don't we want to die?
    Instinctively we've been bred to cherish survival. Conceptually we're aware that we will die anyway. Self-awareness is what prevents simply passing our genes along to satisfy our urge for immortality - knowing that our unique persona will be lost even if an aspect of oneself continues.

    Or at least, that's my take on it.

  9. #39
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Socionics
    ENTj
    Posts
    5,908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Interesting question, I always wondered: Why don't we want to die?
    The relatively simple, but perhaps not very interesting, response is: because all those that did not care about not dying were dead before having any offspring, and thus do not exist anymore.

    As far as the OP goes, I think it would be analytically simpler to start from another question: why don't we not die? A trivial answer would be: so far, there has not been the occasion for
    - a gene mutation that led to the possibility of non-death
    - an environment that selected for the above mentioned gene mutation
    i think that, instead of trying to find complex systemic descriptions of the situation, it's easier (and more likely) to simply reconduct the current state of the world to chance. The focus has almost immediatly gone towards the second statemet i.e. why wouldn't the environment select non-death?
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  10. #40
    Senior Member SuperServal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Posts
    376

    Default

    We don't die - our genes live on in the next generation.

    All that 'dies' is our ego.

    And what a production we make of it. But our genes give rise to new ego after new ego. There are, after all, six thousand million egos here today.

    Our ego is simply they eyes of our genes - and our genes can produce eyes whenever they want to.
    Hmmmm. I wonder if the ego you are talking about is different from awareness. I've often wondered why I am not some other person. The answer is not: because both of you have different genes and different life experiences so you can't be him. This is the traditional definition of the ego; something that is attached to our sensory awareness.

    But awareness underlies the ego. It underlies thinking, feeling, and the personality. Simple sensory perception of the world is pure life experience. What I have wondered is why am I not the awareness of somebody else?

    Why am I in this collection of cells and why does my awareness have these genetics attached to them? My consciousness could have just as easily been in that guy over there or that woman walking down the street. Why am I perceiving the world through this body and this mind?

    Maybe it is this awareness that is common to every person alive (and animals) that is perpetuating genes in order to be able to manifest in the physical world.

    If this awareness is the same across humanity and other living beings then it certainly does not die unless all life dies.

    But you are right, the ego, the sense of self, dies. What if our awareness does not die and it goes back into a collective awareness pool? I wonder if awareness and consciousness increase in intensity if individual awarenesses are aggregated. Or it could be like a fractal.....one huge reserve of consciousness is just the same as an individual's consciousness. Zoom to any scale and the pattern is the same.
    9 wing 1

Similar Threads

  1. Why do we fear what we don't understand?
    By foolish heart in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 11-16-2009, 09:07 PM
  2. Why do we do the things we do?
    By coberst in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-28-2009, 12:28 PM
  3. Why do we seek moral absolutes?
    By coberst in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 08-07-2009, 02:01 PM
  4. Why do we not want those we care about to do drugs?
    By KarenParker in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 05-21-2009, 02:29 PM
  5. Why Do We Find Violence/Misfortune Funny?
    By RansomedbyFire in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 09-29-2007, 07:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO