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  1. #11
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
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    Mutiny on the Bounty....I see (and all within 10 posts!).

    * must away to re-organize my plan.

    In the meantime, others, keep at it. Oh, and Mondo, you have been upgraded to my right-hand-pawn. WithoutAFace, you shall be part of my harem.

  2. #12
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    Let's see if we here in this community can aim to share a future Field's Medal in mathematics, by trying to solve what the pattern is for predicting prime numbers.

    Thoughts/ideas? Discuss!
    There are algorithms that have been developed for discoving new primes. I believe the problem is in finding an exhaustive list of primes. There is no known method of finding every one.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    There are algorithms that have been developed for discoving new primes. I believe the problem is in finding an exhaustive list of primes. There is no known method of finding every one.
    The problem is not "in" finding an exhaustive list of primes. That is the initial question itself, just reworded. The problem is that we do not have one formula for finding infinite prime numbers (if we did, that itself, would be the answer re: pattern).

  4. #14
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    I think I might have found something interesting. I need a little more time, though, and I've only worked up until 200.

  5. #15

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    I always thought prime numbers were interesting. The question to me is asking us to detect the absence of a large number of things rather than the presence of one, which may be why we seem to not find an answer without testing the things aren't there. But if I walked outside and there were no million things there I would know pretty quickly. I wouldn't have to check for them all. That seems to me what we need to find. The perspective where we see the factors, rather than show the lack of them.

    Still the order of primes is decided by the blanks in the multiplication tables. It's like you superimpose a heap of square waves and look for the zeroes. There is a lot of order in number systems, but it is normally due to the base you choose. ie. base 10 you can instantly see 2,3,5 as factors, as 10=2x5 (where you switch to next column), and 10-1=3^2 (where the digit sums step over, ie. 9 18, 27, 36). There's lots of interesting little patterns to find also, like all primes after 3 are 6n+-1 (just because the odd number in between has a factor of 3, and even numbers obviously have a factor of 2). This can be extended up in the same form from memory as you get higher in the number system and more things get excluded ie. xn+-c. None of these things ever seemed to improve the efficiency of finding primes in the end though. Still I'm up for exploring, even if we don't find anything useful in terms of primes, it'll help us get better at maths .
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  6. #16
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    This sounds right:

    Patterns in Prime Numbers

    The different thing about primes is that there is no real pattern to their occurrence. They seem to appear randomly, however, we do know that all but two of them end in either 1, 3, 7, or 9. Other than that though, we have found no distinct pattern. This makes finding primes incredibly hard. If we knew they occurred every 24 number, they would be very easy to find. But, with their random appearances, each number has to be tested individually in order to determine if it is prime or not. Even with computers, this is a very grueling task. Recently, some progress has been made by graphing the prime numbers, but the patterns they form are very difficult to follow, and generating large primes with them would be difficult. Other, smaller patterns can be found in prime numbers, but eventually they terminate.

    Some neat prime numbers that have patterns are 12345678901234567891. This is an ascending prime. Another neat pattern in primes is palindromic primes, and these read the same from front to back, such as 111191111, 919191919, and 123494321.
    Patterns in Prime Numbers

  7. #17
    Welcome to Sunnyside Mondo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    Mutiny on the Bounty....I see (and all within 10 posts!).

    * must away to re-organize my plan.

    In the meantime, others, keep at it. Oh, and Mondo, you have been upgraded to my right-hand-pawn. WithoutAFace, you shall be part of my harem.
    I'm glad to be of service,
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  8. #18
    DoubleplusUngoodNonperson
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    What if there is no pattern due to the nature of division, the process through which you're puting them through? I require a thorough analysis of the nature of division (philosophically and mathematically) ASAP....


    1st question to understanding division: dividng by 0 and by infinite. why is one null and the other zero (in most cases)? actually, how can it be that when we take an infinite series that should essentially be infinite divided by infinite, we can get a whole number?

    This is troublesome.... maybe i'll work on redefining division while you guys check out the more heads on way

  9. #19
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    The problem is not "in" finding an exhaustive list of primes. That is the initial question itself, just reworded. The problem is that we do not have one formula for finding infinite prime numbers (if we did, that itself, would be the answer re: pattern).
    Finding an exhaustive list is not exactly the same as finding infinite prime numbers, although the two problems are closely related.
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  10. #20
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
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    I wrote a javascript to do primes. It would have been nice to have an easy pattern. Of course it wouldn't have been something to write javascript about then.

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