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Thread: Hitler Analysis

  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleepless View Post
    "Oh my, I am so sensitive to conflict, I better start a World War...?"
    That made me lol so hard. Anyway, I like Hitler, lol

  2. #182
    HAHHAHHAH! INTJ123's Avatar
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    I'm just gonna guess and say a really f'd up ESTJ, my reasoning is that they make very charismatic leaders which people flock to(and I think they enjoy being leader), they also have that authoritarian view of heirarchy, they are likely to see others as lower according to social status and finances(I've seen one admit to this), this coupled with their hidden agenda for achieving PERFECTION, and their hard work ethic(looong hours of work he did). Also, this might explain his crappy artwork, I think estj are the least artistic types. ESTJs also have can have crazy emotions welled up inside and can explode, this might make him look like an F.

    I agree with the op in that he's a T though. I doubt he was INTJ though, who knows maybe he was really f'd up one. Maybe he was just so screwed that he lost himself and everything he projected were just dark shadows.

  3. #183
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    I've heard the arguments for him being an F, and the one I remember from most recently is something about him not using good strategy (which is the NT's skill set). But isn't it possible for other factors to affect that, such as the other people working with him, or just his own unhealthy state? (Again, Jung is reported to have said that he was untypable).

    And with all the stuff about him being F or Fe because he was promoting values, or the passion and emotion, it still seems like that might have been more "shadowy" in his deranged state. Just think about what Fe in the Deceiving or Destructive (7th, 8th) position would be like. In Berens' descriptions: "Under stress, they may be deceived into over-addressing others' concerns..." (Deceiving); "When really stressed, they become convinced others don't appreciate or like them. [And hence, the martyrdom complex people like this often develop] Then they overaccommodate other's needs and feel put upon" (Destructive).
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  4. #184
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    Concerning Hitler being a poor strategist, I addressed that argument before:
    Concerning Hitler being a poor strategist....well that can be said of the entire German high command actually. That was one major pitfall of the German military in both World Wars, they had brilliant taciticans for commanders(like Ludendorf) who were also shitty strategists. I forget who, but one WWI German general admitted he never even read Clausewitz before in his life.

    Hitler was quite competent as a commander-in-chief, as he demonstrated earlier in the war. In the dispute concerning how to strike France, Hitler wisely dismissed the General Staff's rehash of the old Schliffen Plan in favor of von Manstein's bold strike through the Ardennes forrest. This was key to the German victory in 1940.

    It's generally agreed that his insistence of no retreat before Moscow helped save the German army from complete destruction at the hands of Red Army counter-attacks in 1941. It can even argued that he helped save the German southern flank from complete annihiliation in early 1943 by having it retreat, but with the terrible cost of abandoning the 9th Army at Stalingrad.

    So no, I wouldn't say he was a complete dumbass at warfare, but he certainly wasn't "the greatest commander in history" as Nazi prograganda stated.

    http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...9-post112.html
    You have to take into account the severe flaws at the heart of German military thinking. Need we forget that Frederick the Great, who's still considered a military genius today, came near close to total defeat in the Seven Years War. The only thing that saved his ass was the sudden death of the Czarina, which knocked Russia out of the war.

  5. #185
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    Thanks. I think I remember seeing that, but I know more recently, probably on INTPc, someone mentioned in passing the "strategy" thing.
    So what you said woud go along with what I said. The entire military was a factor in it as well.
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  6. #186
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    Well Eric, a really good source I'd recommend is Robert M. Citino's The German Way of War: From the Thirty Years' War to the Third Reich.

    Here's what one review of the book states:
    "One of these ideas, prevalent in the U.S. Army today, is that Prussia and Germany's military success sprang largely from the efforts of staff officers who studied warfare intellectually and rationally and made it more a science than an art through the development of what is generally called Auftragstaktik. In this view, the general staff laid out the parameters of an operational plan under whose guidelines field officers operated with a maximum flexibility to achieve the larger goals. Citino finds repeated examples of German field commanders working at cross purposes with overall command objectives and sometimes each other. He concludes that it is much more accurate to assume that the German way of war was based on attacking the enemy at the first reasonable moment with scant regard to prior planning. For Citino, Germany's officer corps' operational behavior was governed more by an aggressive offensive ethos than any sort of intellectual and rational planning. Far from being characterized by a perfect balance of staff planning and control and operational flexibility, the German strategy often involved no real coordination of subordinate commanders which, Citino notes, was unthinkable in the days before modern communication technologies. Many of these field commanders violated orders from superiors in order to push more aggressively, as demonstrated by Heinz Guderian in France in 1940, Hermann von Francois in East Prussia in 1914 and Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz in the 1700s. Indeed, Citino states in his conclusion that the current understanding of Auftragstaktik simply was not a component of Germany's military history."

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  7. #187
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    Anyway, back at the ranch: You can't compare how Hitler was 'at work' with how Hitler was personally. At work, the guy MIGHT have been an iNtJ or an eNtJ, but in his free time he was definitely an iNFj.

    Now cut the crap, you know I'm right.
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  8. #188
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    what jrk did bring upo that thread again ?
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  9. #189
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    Hittler was INTJ.
    He was quiet and trusted few (I).
    He came up with a new kind of warefare (N),
    He was logical and cold (T).
    He was tidy and structured (J).

  10. #190
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    i don't get all the angst over his type.

    whatever he was, he held a view that most of us today find completely unacceptable. it's not like him being a certain type makes people of that type any more likely to commit the atrocities performed hitler and those under his command.

    also important to note that hitler did not do what he did alone. nor could he. he was aided by people of all types.

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