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  1. #31
    Senior Member Ene's Avatar
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    Let's look briefly at some Biblical accounts of Jesus's words and actions and at the perceptions of those around him. Perhaps, with some sort of evidence beyond our own impulses we can build a case for at least one or two possible types. I hope that anyone who is serious about the question will take into account these few pieces of evidence, realizing that they barely scratch the surface.

    1. Jesus looked past what others saw in people. He was a reader of people. He honed in on their thoughts, feelings and intentions. For example, in John chapter 7 verse 77, he said to his twelve most prominent students, "have I not chosen (hand picked) you twelve and one of you is a devil?)" He already knew Judas's character and what it would lead to, but in order to carry out his overall mission, his purpose, the big picture, he chose him anyway. In another place John said that Jesus didn't need anyone to tell him what was in the hearts of people because he knew what was in the hearts of people. When he met the Samaritan woman at the well whom no one else would give the time of day, he saw past her social status, past her "sins" and saw into her heart. He saw her as an individual and broke all social customs of the time by speaking to her as if she had great value.

    2. Jesus was future oriented. He constantly talked about eternity and his "coming kingdom." Jesus told Pilate, "My kingdom is not of this world." He spoke of a future time when Rome would invade Israel and destroy the temple. He said that not one stone would be left upon another. In 70 A.D. Roman soldiers tore the temple in Jerusalem a part stone by stone so that they could scrape the gold filing from between the stones. In Matthew 24 and Luke 21, he lays out a map of Israel's distant future.

    3. We know that he was compassionate and was moved to action by it. He didn't just feel sorry for people. For example, when he was passing through a town and came upon a funeral procession, the Bible says he had compassion on a grieving mother, touched her dead son (breaking another rule) and raised him from the dead. When, in the book of Luke, a crippled woman comes to him in the Synagogue, he proclaims, "Ought not this daughter of Abraham be free." And he heals her. When the religious leader become angry with him he calls them hypocrites and says that care more for their oxen than for their fellow human beings. He was all about having active compassion.

    4. He acted on the belief that the needs of the many outweighed the comfort of the one (See his prayer in the Garden). He chose the cross to set people free. Paul said of Adam, by one man's poor choice (disobedience) all of humanity was brought into slavery of the Kingdom of Darkness but by one man's obedience, Jesus, that anyone who accepted his sacrifice could be set free.

    5. He was fearless. Even in the midst of a deadly storm, he slept and when his disciples woke him afraid of dying, he just told the wind to cease and it did. He constantly and calmly stood up to the hypocrites of his day.

    6. He was not ruled by emotion, but rather let emotion become a tool to further his agenda on earth. He even used his temper to future his purpose. He was power under control. Even when he cleared out the temple with a whip, he first sat down and braided the whip. He wasn't angry just because someone hurt his feelings or got under his skin. He was angry because they were using religion to exploit others. When he stood at the grave of Lazarus and cried, it wasn't because he grieved for the loss but because the people around him didn't believe. They couldn't see what he could see, couldn't understand what he was trying to show them. In the garden when he prayed, if there be any other way (to accomplish his eternal purpose) let this cup (task of being beaten, mocked and crucified) pass from me, but nevertheless, let your will be done, not mine, he was laying aside his own feeling, his dread of how it would impact him and concentrating on what his sacrifice would mean for the human race. In the end, he chose for good of the many.

    7. We know that he was a fantastic speaker and that people were compelled to listen, even when his words made them angry. When he was twelve years old, his family discovered he was missing. Mary and Joseph were frantically looking for him. They found him in a temple, teaching the priests who said he spoke as one who understood spiritual things. As an adult, the Bible records him many times as speaking as one with authority, or rather a true knowledge of his subject matter, which was always dealing with humanity's relationship to God.

    8. We know that he often sought time alone to Talk to God. He spent forty days completely alone in the desert at the start if his public ministry. Several times in the Bible we can read of where he tried to sneak away from the crowds that followed him.

    9. We know that he had an analytical ability to take any question thrown at him and place the responsibility for truth right back into hands of the asker. He did this countless times in the Bible. One incident that comes to my mind is the time a religious leader was trying to trick him on the issue of taxes. The man asked Jesus, "Whom should we pay taxes to, God or Caesar?" If Jesus had said God, then he would have incited the Romans. If he said Caesar then the Jewish leaders would have accused him of blasphemy, so he answered, "Render unto God what is God's and unto Caesar what is Caesar's."

    1o. He delegated authority. When 5,000 men, plus their families followed him out into an isolated area and the crowd was growing hungry, he delegated the task of organizing and feeding them to his followers. And in the book of Mark he tells his followers, "I give you authority....."

    11. He liked children and they liked him. Once when a group of children ran up to him, his adult followers wanted to send them away, but Jesus said, "Let the children come for such is the kingdom of heaven." Then he told them that only those with the trust and humility of a child could truly understand the kingdom of heaven and he said that if someone hurt a child that person would be better off if somebody tied a stone around his neck and tossed him into the sea. (I'm injecting a personal opinion here, but that sounds like a caring teacher to me. )

    12. Finally, let's look at what he told his followers to do. In John's gospel Jesus said, "This is my commandment (instruction) that you love one another." In another place he said that the greatest thing we could do was to love God and the second greatest was to love each other.
    A student said to his master: "You teach me fighting, but you talk about peace. How do you reconcile the two?" The master replied: "It is better to be a warrior in a garden than to be a gardener in a war." - unknown/Chinese

    http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...=61024&page=14

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ene View Post
    I hope my breakdown is helpful with the answers. Personally, I think he was a highly balanced NFJ. I'm reluctant to say whether Fe or Ni was dominant. I definitely see where both seem manifested in his words and actions.
    We are certain Jesus was never tested by a qualified psychometrician, so we are quite certain only a mountebank would tell us the personality type of Jesus.

    Pilots learnt that flying by the seat of their pants led to disaster, so all qualified pilots learn to fly by instrument. And in the same way flying by the seat of our pants in psychometrics leads to intellectually insulting nonsense.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Ene's Avatar
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    Sorry, Mole, you replied before I had finished my initial read through and edit. Prior to noticing your response, I had decided to delete the very section you have quoted.

    Beyond that, I think you're flying off topic and my purpose was to contribute to the exploration of Jesus's type. At any rate, I will return to topic.
    A student said to his master: "You teach me fighting, but you talk about peace. How do you reconcile the two?" The master replied: "It is better to be a warrior in a garden than to be a gardener in a war." - unknown/Chinese

    http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...=61024&page=14

  4. #34
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    The most blatant INFJ in literature.

  5. #35
    Male johnnyyukon's Avatar
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    Hippie







    EDIT: Hipster
    I've had this ice cream bar, since I was a child!

    Each thought's completely warped
    I'm like a walkin', talkin', ouija board.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic Hysteria View Post
    Many many articles and sites (not forums) online state Jesus is an INFP - highly sensitive and intuitive, misunderstood, self-sacrificing, strongly driven my own ideas and opinions, rebellious, empathetic, melancholic.

    Lots of people argue that Jesus is INFJ, or xNFJ. I know many INFJs in my life, and no, I don't have the feeling that xNFJ is precise. If any influential figure out there that makes me think of an INFJ, I would say, Ghandi.
    Definitely not a T, no offense to any T out there. What's not is just not.
    Im misunderstood.

    Therefore jesus is estp

  7. #37
    Senior Member Ene's Avatar
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    Precisely, @Azure Flame.

    Jesus didn't care if he was misunderstood or not. His mission was all that mattered, not his personal feelings. He also wasn't rebellious, just for the sake of standing out or feeling "special". He was just holding true to the course of his mission, to his long range plan. We have to take into account the entirety of documentation regarding him, otherwise we are left to our own opinion and what we "feel" like he might have been and that is so highly subjective to each individual that its next to worthless. So, based on scriptural evidences and accounts, and attempting to analyze them to the best of my feeble abilities, it seems that the majority of evidence points toward INFJ. Although a pretty solid case could also be made for ENFJ. There is no escaping the J. He stated more than once precisely what he had come to and nothing, not even the gates of Hell, could change his course of action. Everything he did was aimed at the ultimate outcome and nothing he did was by accident. He knew who he was and what he had come to do.

    I'm not saying he was NFJ because I want him to be but because evidence points toward it. While compiling my notes, I did consider the possibility of INTJ, but it was his overall focus on humanity that ultimately led me to conclude INFJ.
    A student said to his master: "You teach me fighting, but you talk about peace. How do you reconcile the two?" The master replied: "It is better to be a warrior in a garden than to be a gardener in a war." - unknown/Chinese

    http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...=61024&page=14

  8. #38
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    Apart from the theology of the New Testament, we know very little about Jesus the man.

    Except we now know quite a lot about the social and political environment of Jesus.

    So we can reasonably conclude that Jesus was a Zealot, who was regarded for a time by Judaism as the Messiah. But under Judaism, Jesus failed to carry out the work of a Jewish Messiah by driving out the Romans, and so Judaism rejected Jesus as the Messiah.

    And to type Jesus is purely the work of imagination and has nothing to do with reality.

    Typing Jesus only tells us about the person doing the typing.

  9. #39
    Senior Member wildflower's Avatar
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    i think he vastly exceeds any MBTI type or typology system. he was known to be highly compassionate but when he was a 12 years old people were amazed by his knowledge when talking to the teachers of the law. while jesus talked about heaven/paradise/eternal life he was every day dealing with people's sicknesses and personal struggles. besides eternal life starts now. he spent time alone and yet in crowds and had his disciples, men and women, who followed him daily. he fulfilled the law and yet exceeded it by his actions. jesus is not in a box.

    the ESTP answers crack me up. time to par-tay with jesus! make some bread and raise the dead.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildflower View Post
    i think he vastly exceeds any MBTI type or typology system. he was known to be highly compassionate but when he was a 12 years old people were amazed by his knowledge when talking to the teachers of the law. while jesus talked about heaven/paradise/eternal life he was every day dealing with people's sicknesses and personal struggles. besides eternal life starts now. he spent time alone and yet in crowds and had his disciples, men and women, who followed him daily. he fulfilled the law and yet exceeded it by his actions. jesus is not in a box.

    the ESTP answers crack me up. time to par-tay with jesus! make some bread and raise the dead.
    The way I see it if jesus is no not "ESTp" then he is probably INFJ.

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