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Thread: Forest Gump!

  1. #31
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by candylandjoe View Post
    I'm entirely just curious how solving nothing solves boredom.

    It's all in the eye of the beholder, right?
    i mean... why play board games, or cards? why play video games? or heck, why watch movies or read fiction? why doodle? why waste countless hours on facebook or forums like typology central?
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

  2. #32
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    Quote Originally Posted by candylandjoe View Post
    I'm entirely just curious how solving nothing solves boredom.

    It's all in the eye of the beholder, right?
    You mean the point of any puzzle ever? Just because the phrase is a cliche doesn't make it not true.

  3. #33
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    i just finished forrest gump, and am actually leaning more towards ISFJ now.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

  4. #34
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    You were watching it? Strange. Then I must remember it well enough.

  5. #35
    jump sleuthiness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReflecttcelfeR View Post
    I think typing characters is more of hobby than actually trying to find a bigger picture. It serves no real purpose other than to occupy the mind. Whether the director was thinking about types (Even if they used a different name for it) the characters usually still have a strong archetypal equivalent even if on accident. The point of acting is not to be yourself so it should be that the actors type does not matter.
    Despite the fact that actors in leading roles can't hide or modify their type onscreen, unless it's a 5 minute short or they're camouflaged in cgi animation or fat/monster suit for the duration. The answers are so painfully obvious that I wonder why more users don't start from the implied angle.

    I'm not discounting the notion that starting with characters can be fun or stimulating, but rather questioning effectiveness of the approach in the long term.

    thinking of you

  6. #36
    jump sleuthiness's Avatar
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    Shoot, I forgot about that "this is more of a hobby" part.

    thinking of you

  7. #37
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by candylandjoe View Post
    Despite the fact that actors in leading roles can't hide or modify their type onscreen, unless it's a 5 minute short or they're camouflaged in cgi animation or fat/monster suit for the duration. The answers are so painfully obvious that I wonder why more users don't start from the implied angle.

    I'm not discounting the notion that starting with characters can be fun or stimulating, but rather questioning effectiveness of the approach in the long term.
    i think that good actors do well to not let their own type shine through the character.

    with tom hanks and forrest gump, i don't see tom's personality so much as i see a character.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

  8. #38
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    I think that might be where the confusion lies. My aim isn't necessarily to find out ultimately the actor/actresses type, but how well they were able to be that character, but I do find what you said about starting with the actors type to figure out what the character will be. It points to the fact types can sometimes change order preferences to appear like another person a.k.a. Acting! Good observation.

  9. #39
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by candylandjoe View Post
    I'm entirely just curious how solving nothing solves boredom.

    It's all in the eye of the beholder, right?
    I think that many characters are written with a type in mind - somewhat unconsciously - and that it's fun trying to find out which pattern they fall under (and I say "somewhat unconsciously" because I think archetypes might be a sort of natural phenemenon, and that writers tap into it often, even without referencing anything like MBTI). I understand that some things get in the way (the actor's type, the writer's type, etc..), but there's usually enough in characters that they can take on a life of their own. MBTI specifically was meant to be applied in the field of psychology/self-help/group dynamics, I guess, but it's also fun for playing around with subjects like this. Hell, some of Jung's research was about literary theory. So it all comes around full circle.

  10. #40
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    As for actors, I tend to have faith in the "character" actors to be good enough not get in the way, and the ones who are better at just "playing themselves" will always get parts that are like themselves (in which case, you can just focus on the actor's type). As for the character actors, a lot of them these days learn through the foundation set out by Stanislavski - and his students. One of his students in particular, Michael Chekhov (nephew of the playwright, Anton Chekhov), actually taught a method that had some type theory elements to it. His main focus was the "psychological gesture". He taught that if an actor could pinpoint the crux/gesture of a written character, then he/she would begin to embody the whole character effortlessly. And his influence ranges from Gregory Peck to Johnny Depp (he's long dead, but Depp is a fan of his books.. like many actors).

    So anyways, just another thought. There's basis in this sort of psychological pattern recognition not only with writers, but with actors too. So the fun of it could be in deconstructing what they're doing.

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