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Thread: Breaking Bad

  1. #341
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    @ the last few posts ... maybe you guys should spoiler tag part of your stuff? I suspect there's more than a few folks who haven't seen the ending yet.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  2. #342
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    oh maybe...i just assumed people would avoid this thread like i did until today because i hadn't watched it yet.

  3. #343
    Senior Member SensEye's Avatar
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    This ^. It's a dangerous business to read anything Breaking Bad related right now (here or anywhere) if you haven't watched all the episodes.

  4. #344
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I think what we all want to know is...

  5. #345
    Senior Member Stigmata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I think what we all want to know is...
    This video has brought me more amusement than I'd care to admit publicly.


  6. #346
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    That is perfect.

  7. #347
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stigmata View Post
    This video has brought me more amusement than I'd care to admit publicly.

    that's hilarious! is it an hour of that?

  8. #348
    Senior Member Stigmata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    that's hilarious! is it an hour of that?
    Yep.


    Todd is definitely on his way to becoming my new favorite meme.


  9. #349

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    oh maybe...i just assumed people would avoid this thread like i did until today because i hadn't watched it yet.
    Quote Originally Posted by SensEye View Post
    This ^. It's a dangerous business to read anything Breaking Bad related right now (here or anywhere) if you haven't watched all the episodes.
    Same. I watched it a day late and didn't visit the thread until then.
    Everybody have fun tonight. Everybody Wang Chung tonight.

    Johari
    /Nohari

  10. #350
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EffEmDoubleyou View Post
    I thought it was a good, not great finale. The predictability (aside from Walt's reason for visiting the Schwartzes) doesn't bother me, because most of the endgame of the plot had been played out in the previous two episodes. To me, it felt like "Ozymandias" was the truest finale. We all knew what the last few cards were that this episode had to play; it was more of a denouement.

    What was more important here than clever plotting was that Walt (presumably assisted by months of solitude) finally came to terms with both the horror of his actions and the true nature of his motives. In the previous episode, when Walt, Jr. refused the money, a newly self-aware Walt was happy to finally surrender because he could no longer do anything to redeem himself. But after seeing the Schwartzes on TV and figuring out a way to truly help his family instead of using family as an excuse for his ego-driven behavior, he then methodically set about making that happen. His motives for wiping out the Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight were likewise genuinely family-oriented - he was protecting his family from retribution. This was made clear when he refused Jack's offer to trade the $70 million for his life. The finale wasn't about wowing anyone; the flash forwards had seen to that. It was about Walt's realization and motives.

    I did have problems with the finale - chiefly, the cartoonish effectiveness of Walt's remote control gun and Jack's Bond-villian-like insistence on dragging out the confrontation instead of just shooting Walt already - but predictability was not among them. I questioned whether Walt deserves to be redeemed in even the minor way he was, but he is really only redeemed in his mind. Walt gets to die secure in the knowledge that he's arranged everything, but only because he doesn't have to live to see whether his rather precarious plans come to fruition (Will Skyler really be able to trade Hank's body for immunity? Will the Schwartzes really follow through? Will Walt, Jr. accept the money without suspicion?) Everyone else will go on living diminished, broken lives because of his actions.

    The only thing I really want to know is where those barrels of cash are and if anyone will ever find them! I kind of love that the point of the whole thing from the very beginning - the money - becomes irrelevant and vanished in the end.
    I agree with you for the most part, but I still think it was awesome. I actually really appreciated that the true climax occurred in Ozymandias. It can be disconcerting to me when the television medium eschews the usual storytelling landmarks of rising action/climax/falling action to force an "exciting conclusion" in the final episode. And I thought that was done well in this case.

    I liked what Zack Handlen on the Onion AV Club said about it:

    As the final eight episodes of Breaking Bad ran down to a close, it was hard for me to think of much else beyond the show: getting caught up in the story again, being terrified for certain characters’ lives, trying to second-guess Vince Gilligan and his writers (and failing every time), and hoping the last episode would, for want of a better word, fit. Finales are always important, even when they aren’t designed to be. We look for meaning in structure, and read significance into context, so that the last hour (or half hour) of a show has inherent weight to it. “Felina” was designed as a conclusion; what’s more, it was a conclusion to one of the most intensely serialized narratives in the history of the medium, a story that built on top of itself week by week, year by year, until it came to a closing point. If the finale had been weak—if Gilligan and company has strained plausibility too much, if they’d tried to force in one last shocking twist, if they’d made it too happy or too dire, if they pushed in an ironic twist that offered a conclusion without closure—it would’ve been impossible to remove it from the rest of the show. To balance this seemed nearly impossible to me. Long stories are difficult to pull off; perspectives change, personalities shift, and no plan is a perfect plan. The idea that anyone could’ve known exactly where Walter White’s adventures in chemistry were going to end up is absurd, because television is not a static medium. It’s not a novel where an author can go back and fiddle with the first chapters to make sure everything is to his or her liking. “Felina” is simple, sad, and a little goofy. It has its lumpy bits, its moments of inelegance, and it failed to make some grand final statement on power and greed, but that’s fine. “Ozymandias,” the series’ antepenultimate hour, was the true slam-bang climax, the moment when all the horrors came home to roost. The last two episodes are just the slow, lonely shuffle of a man who is finally forced to see who he really is. He gets one last chance to do some good with the only tools he has left. I think I knew it was perfect when I saw Cranston back in the clothes he wore in the pilot. No more Heisenberg. He’s just Walter Hartwell White. And then he’s gone.

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