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Thread: INFP Villains?

  1. #61
    Junior Member Ambrosia's Avatar
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    Has anyone played the game Tales of Symphonia? I definitely think Mithos/Yggdrasill is an INFP. And, of course, his status as a villain is subject to debate.

  2. #62
    Writing... Tamske's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Yes, I know the typology in question. Passionate is ESFJ or ENFJ: Active, Emotive and Secundary.

    Amorphous is INTP or ISTP: The exact opposite of Passionate: Non-Active, Non-Emotive and Primary. As you can see, I am Amorphous. I morph not. I am devoid of a form.
    I structure not. Do I want to be Amorphous? Yes. Do I want to waste my life in endless Passion? No.

    You are Active, Non-Emotive and Primary. In the other words, you are a Sanguine. Your exact opposite is Non-Active, Emotive and Secundary: The Sentimental: INFJ or ISFJ.

    Then there is the Phlegmatic. She is Active, Non-Emotive and Secundary: The ESTJ or the ENTJ. Very common in the army. In the high echelons of course. Unfortunately, also common type among the university professors. Her exact opposite is Non-Active, Emotive and Primary: the Nervous: The INFP or the ISFP. The Poet or the Artist. Edgar Allan, Vincent Van.

    Exercise makes perfect. Your religion teacher in vain despised the Amorphous. Because he was the Passionate, the opposite. A typical priest. The evil character of the type makes bombs. Because the Passion is there, although ill directed.

    One variable: Two types. Two variables: Four types. Three variables: Eight types. Four variables: Sixteen types.

    Oh. I forgot The Choleric and her opposite, the Apathetic.
    Choleric: Active, Emotive, Primary. ENFP or ESFP.
    Apathetic: Non-Active, Non-Emotive, Secundary. ISTJ or INTJ.
    Wow. I didn't realise it was this simple!
    I thought the (non)-Emotional and (non)-Active traits were a mixture of E/I and J/P.
    But you're absolutely right.
    We didn't see the amorphous (and apathetic,...) as bad, we rather saw them as boring. The Passionates were the main actors in the world stage (both good and evil), the Cholerics were the sidekicks and the others were fillers. I knew even then that this was not true, but I couldn't think of examples.
    I scored Choleric, by the way. As we all biased our results to score Emotional and Active, I'm quite happy to get at least my Perceiving/Primary trait right
    Teacher being a Passionate himself... So true! Based on my memories, I would type him an ENFJ. The gist of his lessons: "Praying and meditation is bullshit. You've got to help people, protest against nuclear weapons,... in order to find God." I still adhere to this creed

    Okay, back to the topic now... INFP villains!
    Maybe we should look also at the more "local" villains. I mean: the world-dominating (E), plotting (J) fantasy villain is most likely not an INFP. But you can call a character a villain even if he doesn't seek world domination or destruction. If he wrecks the life of the main character, causes misery,... he's a villain.

    I found an ENFP villainess: Carmen from the Bizet opera.
    Carmen causes murder due to her flightiness. So she is not just a villainess who is also an ENFP; her ENFP traits are the cause of the misery!

    I'm going to attack the question from another angle, now.
    Is extraversion necessary? I don't think so. I wouldn't call Voldemort an extravert. Voldy is not a Perceiver, though... He's constantly plotting and has difficulties believing and adjusting if the universe doesn't follow his plans.
    Intuitive... I can't even think of Sensing villains right now.
    Feeling... No problems there. Thinking villains could be nice, but evil Feelers are gold! (I'm talking from the perspective of an amateur writer now).
    Perceiving... why not? You at least abolish the mad schemes of the classic fantasy villain!

    If you combine everything, you get the INFP... The problem with "combining" is that INFP is not equal to I+N+F+P. The different traits interact with each other. If you want to write an INFP villain, you've got to take care he doesn't become depressed or commit suicide instead of causing misery to other characters.
    My INFP villain just wants to get out of his black hole and the side effects of his trying are disastrous.

  3. #63
    Ginkgo
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    I'm not really into Naruto, but I think I found one.

  4. #64
    Senor Membrane
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adoamros View Post
    school shooters tend to come to mind.
    Yes! I have actually compared myself to school shooters. When I was younger I was a bit of a loser like they, and in different circumstances I might have done some stupid moves.. I think it would not be too far fetched idea. You could even take it further, if the INFP had the resources he might become kind of a Hitler. The problem with that theory is that INFPs don't usually get near the resources in any organisation.

  5. #65
    Uniqueorn William K's Avatar
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    Hmmm, I could see a scientist type that tries to do good but because of an accident winds up being a sympathetic but tragic villain. Like Dr Jekyll, or the doctor in The Fly.

  6. #66
    Writing... Tamske's Avatar
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    An INFP scientist?

    Moreover, the scientist in your scenario is not evil. If the accident changes him into an evil person, you have to re-type him, too. You've got to look at the corrupted scientist. He's different than the one before the experiment. Though Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are one and the same person, they act so differently it's better to assign each one a type, separately, without looking at their connection.

    Wouldn't it be nice to have a twisted INFP character cause pain and suffering? And not doing this by acting something else, but just because of his INFP characteristics?
    After all, it IS possible to have a shallow, whimsical ENFP-gone-awry cause suffering - something I never thought possible before I tried to type Carmen from Bizet.

  7. #67
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    For the last time : Skywalker is an ENFP. If you've seen one under stress it's very easy to imagine his Te taking over and consuming him.



    I could see an NFP going nihilist after some sort of trauma and acquiring that new set of principles/beliefs as he/she tried to make sense out of the situation.
    Yup.

    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    I think INFPs are probably the type most prone to genuine nihilism (as distinct from mere selfishness), since we're probably the type least constrained by mores and the opinions of those around us. Thus when we lose our way with our core values we can really lose our way. I think this probably leads more often to serious addictions and suicide than villainy though.
    Yeah, INFP = inward focused; ENFP = outward focus.

    So would that make ENFPs better villains?
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  8. #68
    Uniqueorn William K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamske View Post
    Wouldn't it be nice to have a twisted INFP character cause pain and suffering? And not doing this by acting something else, but just because of his INFP characteristics?
    That will be painful for the villain I think... The picture I get is an INFP stabbing another person with a long knife, but while wrapping the palm around the sharp blade itself instead of the hilt :P

  9. #69
    Writing... Tamske's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by William K View Post
    That will be painful for the villain I think... The picture I get is an INFP stabbing another person with a long knife, but while wrapping the palm around the sharp blade itself instead of the hilt :P
    Those INFPs!

  10. #70
    Senior Member Valuable_Money's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    This is why I think the Joker (TDK) is a dark-side NFP. Not sure about INFP or ENFP. The "you complete me" line suggests extrovert, but I think INFPs can be prone to electing an Enemy who symbolizes (or is idealized into) all they hate. Take Ahab and Moby Dick, for instance.

    People keep saying he's an ENTP, but I think that's just because he's smart, funny and nasty. Values are what drives him though. Precisely how he came to be how he is we're not told.

    The only real problem I have with this typing is the quite spectacular use of Ni he apparently shows. He's always at least one step ahead of everyone. This tension between his obvious foresight/planning and his self-description ("Do I really look like a guy with a plan? I'm like a dog chasing cars -- I wouldn't know what to do with one if I caught it.") and avowed aim to show everyone how futile their attempts to control their lives are makes him a difficult character to type. But if people are fine with a planning joker being an ENTP then I don't see why they should have a problem with him being an XNFP.
    The Joker is hardcore Ne,
    He lives for entertainment "I wont kill you because your too much fun" hes trying to plunge the world into anarchy because he thinks its fun.
    He may have plans but his plans are mostly Ne + Ti and occasionally Fe(He predicts peoples actions "You didnt disappoint you let 5 innocent people die")

    Havent there already been like 50 threads about this? The argument allways comes down to wether or not ENTPs possess the capacity for even the most basic planning.
    Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh? wgah'nagl fhtagn

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