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Thread: Gandhi

  1. #31
    Senior Member SuperFob's Avatar
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    It would have taken a Mastermind to overtake the British, I would think. He was an incredible strategist which is an NT trait, and he followed through with his strategies which implies J. An NF is more of a counselor and less a mastermind and wouldn't have had the ability to abstractly plot out movements to overthrow the giant that lay resting atop it.

  2. #32
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    I still don't see INFP. I see INxJ

    edit: What I think you are doing is implying his concrete personality and what he did to match his personality. Did we know him personally? No, we didn't so we really can't claim his type based on what he did. Think abstractly for a moment, will you. It's not what he did, but how he did it. He did it thoroughly and strongly. Either he had a terribly hard and rough time doing it as an NP, or he was a J. I tend to think he was a J because of his incredible strength towards what he wanted.
    When I think abstractly about him he seems like Fi personified.

    It would have taken a Mastermind to overtake the British, I would think. He was an incredible strategist which is an NT trait, and he followed through with his strategies which implies J. An NF is more of a counselor and less a mastermind and wouldn't have had the ability to abstractly plot out movements to overthrow the giant that lay resting atop it.
    Passive resistance is less of a strategy and more of an ideal, the fact that it worked seemed almost beside the point because he felt it was simply the "right" thing to do, the only "good" way to bring about change.

    There's no way he was an INFP, man. You can think whatever you want, and I can think what I want. But in general, I'm just trying to prove my opinion and nothing more. We can't be sure.
    I agree, we can't be sure, you can go on being certain and putting limits on what types can and can't do (which don't really exist) and I will go on being uncertain and openminded about his possible type.
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

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  3. #33
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    Another description with parts that I think best reflect Gandhi in bold;

    INFPs, more than other iNtuitive Feeling types, are focused on making the world a better place for people. Their primary goal is to find out their meaning in life. What is their purpose? How can they best serve humanity in their lives? They are idealists and perfectionists, who drive themselves hard in their quest for achieving the goals they have identified for themselves.

    INFPs are highly intuitive about people. They rely heavily on their intuitions to guide them, and use their discoveries to constantly search for value in life. They are on a continuous mission to find the truth and meaning underlying things. Every encounter and every piece of knowledge gained gets sifted through the INFP's value system, and is evaluated to see if it has any potential to help the INFP define or refine their own path in life. The goal at the end of the path is always the same - the INFP is driven to help people and make the world a better place.

    Generally thoughtful and considerate, INFPs are good listeners and put people at ease. Although they may be reserved in expressing emotion, they have a very deep well of caring and are genuinely interested in understanding people. This sincerity is sensed by others, making the INFP a valued friend and confidante. An INFP can be quite warm with people he or she knows well.

    INFPs do not like conflict, and go to great lengths to avoid it. If they must face it, they will always approach it from the perspective of their feelings. In conflict situations, INFPs place little importance on who is right and who is wrong. They focus on the way that the conflict makes them feel, and indeed don't really care whether or not they're right. They don't want to feel badly. This trait sometimes makes them appear irrational and illogical in conflict situations. On the other hand, INFPs make very good mediators, and are typically good at solving other people's conflicts, because they intuitively understand people's perspectives and feelings, and genuinely want to help them.

    INFPs are flexible and laid-back, until one of their values is violated. In the face of their value system being threatened, INFPs can become aggressive defenders, fighting passionately for their cause. When an INFP has adopted a project or job which they're interested in, it usually becomes a "cause" for them. Although they are not detail-oriented individuals, they will cover every possible detail with determination and vigor when working for their "cause".

    When it comes to the mundane details of life maintenance, INFPs are typically completely unaware of such things. They might go for long periods without noticing a stain on the carpet, but carefully and meticulously brush a speck of dust off of their project booklet.

    INFPs do not like to deal with hard facts and logic. Their focus on their feelings and the Human Condition makes it difficult for them to deal with impersonal judgment. They don't understand or believe in the validity of impersonal judgment, which makes them naturally rather ineffective at using it. Most INFPs will avoid impersonal analysis, although some have developed this ability and are able to be quite logical. Under stress, it's not uncommon for INFPs to mis-use hard logic in the heat of anger, throwing out fact after (often inaccurate) fact in an emotional outburst.

    INFPs have very high standards and are perfectionists. Consequently, they are usually hard on themselves, and don't give themselves enough credit. INFPs may have problems working on a project in a group, because their standards are likely to be higher than other members' of the group. In group situations, they may have a "control" problem. The INFP needs to work on balancing their high ideals with the requirements of every day living. Without resolving this conflict, they will never be happy with themselves, and they may become confused and paralyzed about what to do with their lives.

    INFPs are usually talented writers. They may be awkard and uncomfortable with expressing themselves verbally, but have a wonderful ability to define and express what they're feeling on paper. INFPs also appear frequently in social service professions, such as counselling or teaching. They are at their best in situations where they're working towards the public good, and in which they don't need to use hard logic.

    INFPs who function in their well-developed sides can accomplish great and wonderful things, which they will rarely give themselves credit for. Some of the great, humanistic catalysts in the world have been INFPs.
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  4. #34
    Senior Member SuperFob's Avatar
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    Quinlan, while I could certainly see Gandhi being a P, I think most of the stuff you highlighted in that article would apply to all NF's in general. The 'laid-back' part would probably be the one thing that applies to NFP's but not to NFJ's.

  5. #35
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    The difference is, where is his control and judgement directed? Towards the outer world or towards his inner world? To me it seems obviously directed inwards; passive resistance, non-violence, fasting etc., it's all about self-control, a FJs strength of will/control is directed outwards onto others and things, a FPs strength of will/control is directed inwards upon themselves.

    This self-control is the strength/persistance/will that some people mistake for Jness, what they are mistaking is that these traits are also common in Ps, they are just introverted so they're not quite so "out there". His judgement is obvious because being INFP his judging function is dominant.
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

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  6. #36
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Listen man, in my eyes he's an INTJ and I see all of what you have said and I still stand by my opinion. It's not like me to be stubborn, but I simply cannot see him has as an INFP.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  7. #37
    Senior Member The Outsider's Avatar
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    So far, Quinlan has made the best arguments here, so I stand with him.

  8. #38
    Welcome to Sunnyside Mondo's Avatar
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    I think Gandhi was an INFJ.
    I read a biography on him.
    Here are my reasons for thinking so.

    -He was always very sensitive. He is described as being very sympathetic and empathetic.
    -He was described as very reserved, and despite being a revolution leader- unlike more Extraverted revolutionaries (e.g: Martin Luther King), little is described about the wide range of friendships he had- probably because he didn't seek such things.
    -Gandhi always found self-control, discipline, and hard work to be very easy. He took on leadership roles very early on, while he didn't actively seek out leadership and had very few traits of an ambitious self-promoter, he was confident in his ability to lead and organize.
    When he was in South Africa in his twenties, there were others who were disappointed with the discrimination against Indians, and others who were doing something about it- Gandhi was the one who held the reins of leadership despite only being his twenties.

    Hence, why I think Gandhi was an INFJ.
    MBTI Type: iNTj
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  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Listen man, in my eyes he's an INTJ and I see all of what you have said and I still stand by my opinion. It's not like me to be stubborn, but I simply cannot see him has as an INFP.
    Yes, he could have been the mystical subtype of INTJ. i.e. Giordano Bruno.

    But really Ghandi seems too group orientated, external systems bent for INFP. I could see INTJ or INFJ.

  10. #40
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    ^ Agreed on INFJ.

    It takes more of a functional perspective than a profile-oriented one to see why, though.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

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