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Thread: Gandhi

  1. #21
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Why do people assume just because a person is compassionate and freedom fighting that they must be an NF?

    In general, why?
    I assume he is an F because I'm leaning towards his dominant function being Fi.


    I can at least give him INFJ, but I still think INTJ is open because he was non violent to the grave and personally, I think an NF would have backed down or lashed out after a while.
    Are you saying NF = inevitably violent? I don't understand this. Fi is stubborn and resilient, once a line has been drawn nothing external will budge it.

    No way he was a P, he was the change "Be the change you wish to see in the world." He carried and manifested everything, and I can't see a P being so persistent
    Exactly(bolded)! Internal judgement not external judgement. His focus on change was directed inwards not outwards, this actually points towards P not away from it. As for persistence, this has nothing to do with J or P, he was so persistent and resistant of external pressure because he drew his strengh from within (Fi), not from the external world.
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  2. #22
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    I still don't see INFP. I see INxJ

    edit: What I think you are doing is implying his concrete personality and what he did to match his personality. Did we know him personally? No, we didn't so we really can't claim his type based on what he did. Think abstractly for a moment, will you. It's not what he did, but how he did it. He did it thoroughly and strongly. Either he had a terribly hard and rough time doing it as an NP, or he was a J. I tend to think he was a J because of his incredible strength towards what he wanted.

    It would have taken a Mastermind to overtake the British, I would think. He was an incredible strategist which is an NT trait, and he followed through with his strategies which implies J. An NF is more of a counselor and less a mastermind and wouldn't have had the ability to abstractly plot out movements to overthrow the giant that lay resting atop it.

    There's no way he was an INFP, man. You can think whatever you want, and I can think what I want. But in general, I'm just trying to prove my opinion and nothing more. We can't be sure.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

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    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quinlan View Post
    He wasn't a typical leader though, surely INFPs can be leaders? And I imagine an INFP leader would be very much a lead by example type, take me or leave me kind of leader like Gandhi.



    Resistence of authority seems more of a P trait than a J trait to me and strong Fi is one of the most (if not the most) stubborn functions regarding things of importance.



    Emotions ruining a feeler? Why?

    Gandhi's idealogy of being the change you want to see in the world seems very Fi to me, change the world not by changing others or systems but by changing yourself.
    You don't think emotions can ruin a feeler? Maybe not an SF, but NF goes so deep that emotions can turn somebody sour given the right circumstances.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  4. #24
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    You don't think emotions can ruin a feeler?
    I don't think it's exclusive to F or even any more likely to happen to an F than a T.
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

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    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quinlan View Post
    I don't think it's exclusive to F or even any more likely to happen to an F than a T.
    I don't either. I think an F would be more torn down by emotions than a T would be given a harsh and radical situation like Ghandi.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    I don't either. I think an F would be more torn down by emotions than a T would be given a harsh and radical situation like Ghandi.
    I don't understand this, a healthy F is a master of emotion, not a slave to it. Are you saying Fs are emotionally weaker than Ts?
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

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  7. #27
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    ^ They are, but they're also stronger at times. They simply have a greater range of emotional depth, at both extremes.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  8. #28
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quinlan View Post
    I don't understand this, a healthy F is a master of emotion, not a slave to it. Are you saying Fs are emotionally weaker than Ts?
    No, but more vulnerable. Do you realize the full extent that emotions have to play within an NF?
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  9. #29
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    ^ They are, but they're also stronger at times. They simply have a greater range of emotional depth, at both extremes.
    That's EXACTLY what I have always thought. Thank you.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  10. #30
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    No, but more vulnerable. Do you realize the full extent that emotions have to play within an NF?
    No, not truly, I am SF. I do feel I have a reasonable understanding of what Fi involves though.

    I know some Ts love to think that they have no (or little) emotion but I think when the shit hits the fan and a T is overcome by a powerful emotion, they can be completely blindsided, they're less likely to understand the emotion (through lack of experience) and therefore less likely to deal with it in a healthy way.

    If I was to suggest a tenous link between type and the likeliness of emotional breakdown, I would suggest people-pleasers (FJs) and workaholics (TJs) as the most likely.

    Neuroticism is probably a better measure than T vs F.

    That is just how I think of the theory.
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

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