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Thread: Crispin Glover

  1. #11
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    Wha! Everybody knows NTs can't act.
    wha?? jack nicholson is entj isn't he? john malkovich is intj...right?

    crispin might be intj too??
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

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    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Hey, I come I can't stereotype?!

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    knock yourself out sy...literally.
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

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    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Don't mind if I do

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    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erinavery View Post
    wha?? jack nicholson is entj isn't he? john malkovich is intj...right?

    crispin might be intj too??
    I'm pretty sure Jack is ESTP, actually. But hey, I don't know for sure.

    I love to see how many people come into celebity typing threads and say "it's obvious!". I love more the inevitable point when 4 different types have been suggested as obvious.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


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    On casting people with Down's Syndrome:

    "I had written a number of screenplays before I got to writing What Is It? that had used the concept of having actors with Down's Syndrome in various ways.

    "But, in 1996 there were two young writers who approached my agent with the offer to act in a film they had written and wanted to direct. It was around that time that I felt that the next corporately funded filmmaker I would work with would be myself.

    "So I talked to them about it and told them I would be interested in acting in it if I could rework it and direct it. They came and met with me, and the main thing that I wanted was for the majority of the characters to be played by actors with Down's Syndrome. And they were ok with that concept. So I reworked the original screenplay and David Lynch said he would executive produce it for me to direct. Which was a very helpful thing."

    On what to do when things don't work:

    "I went to one of the larger corporate film funding agencies in Los Angeles, but after a number of meetings they decided that they were uncomfortable with the idea that the majority of the characters were played by actors with Down's Syndrome.

    "It was then that decided to write a short film to promote this as a viable concept. And that is when I wrote What Is It?, which was supposed to be a short film. But it turned out to be 84 minutes, and it was a film that didn't really work.

    "So I shot more footage and worked on it for another two and a half years to get it to the point where I had a locked film.

    "I also decided that the original screenplay that I had reworked would make a nice sequel to it, and then I realized that there was another screenplay that I had read years before by a man named Steven C. Stewart who had a severe case of cerebral palsy, and that if I put him into the film What Is It? that I could then make his film, It Is Fine. Everything Is Fine, and have a trilogy of sorts.

    On why taboos are good:

    "The corporate entity was concerned about funding a film in which a majority of the actors were playing characters who did not have Down's Syndrome [because] this was a taboo.

    "You can have a corporately funded film wherein the characters have Down's Syndrome and are played by actors with Down's Syndrome, even that isn't commonly dealt with, but to have actors with Down's Syndrome playing characters without Down's Syndrome, well that has many grey areas.

    "Then I realized that anything that would make an audience member truly uncomfortable would be something corporately they would have trouble with.

    "If you look at the last 30 years, anything that makes the audience uncomfortable has been excised. And I think that is a very damaging thing because there are moments when an audience looks up at the screen and wonders, 'Is this right what I'm watching? Is this wrong? Should I be here? Should the filmmaker have done this? What is it?' which is the title of the film.

    "If there is a taboo in the culture, what does it mean when the taboo has been ubiquitously excised? This is very damaging because when people are asking those questions, they are actually thinking about things and that's a positive thing."

    On surrealism:

    "I generally avoid any kind of groups at all. And I did not make the film as part of the surrealist group. But strangely, the surrealists are actually a group I do like.

    "I read Bunuel's autobiography [Luis Bunuel, the father of surrealism], and according to his description [the surrealists] were a political group... and a very serious group. And he said at the time that if they had known they were going to be known as artists they would have considered themselves to be a failed group.

    "Bunuel has definitely been a huge influence, especially on What Is It? And I was reading his autobiography as I edited the film.

    "The most important thing that the surrealists defined was free association: how to use this free association, this Freudian association to bring about deeper psychological elements for art. I very much think that is a worthwhile idea to explore.

    On bossing the audience around:

    "I certainly like the notion that Bunuel doesn't dictate to people what they should be thinking about concerning the work. That, I think, is the most important part.

    "I do tend toward constructing what the meanings behind particular things are and utilizing certain structures with foreknowledge of what structure does. That is something that I don't call free association, it's more of a narrative. I would just call it drama."
    The Discomforter :: Entertainment :: thetyee.ca

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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    I'm pretty sure Jack is ESTP, actually. But hey, I don't know for sure.

    I love to see how many people come into celebity typing threads and say "it's obvious!". I love more the inevitable point when 4 different types have been suggested as obvious.
    See, this is why I don't want to type him myself. I know I'm biased, VERY much so. Crispin Glover's brain drives me crazy. Eeesh. Anyway.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    I'm pretty sure Jack is ESTP, actually. But hey, I don't know for sure.

    I love to see how many people come into celebity typing threads and say "it's obvious!
    ". I love more the inevitable point when 4 different types have been suggested as obvious.
    i have no clue an am not saying anything's obvious just so ya know. i was actually asking because that's what i've heard but i don't know for sure.
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  9. #19
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    The Bird Needles Crispin Glover Over His Alleged Meltdown At Chandler Cinemas

    So the Bird was out for First Friday recently when it ran into Andrea Beesley-Brown, a.k.a. the Midnite Movie Mamacita, known for hosting splatter and grindhouse flicks at Chandler Cinemas, where she doubles as the operations manager. The perky New Zealander told this tweeter a wacky tale of Crispin Glover's visit to Sand Land to showcase his deeply weird art film What Is It?, which features actors afflicted with Down syndrome, naked chicks, swastikas, and a butt-load of dead snails.

    Glover brought his surreal celluloid romp to Chandler for a three-day run at the beginning of May. And for fans of the quirky character actor, who's given memorable performances in movies ranging from Back to the Future and Charlie's Angels to Willard and River's Edge, to name a few, it must've been a Gloverama dream come true.

    Before the flick's screening, Glover narrated a long slideshow drawn in part from self-published scrapbooks such as Rat Catching and Oak Mott. Afterward, Glover engaged the audience in a protracted Q & A and wound up signing autographs, taking pics, and chatting with long lines of slavish Glover-lovers.

    "For $18, it's a very long night," Beesley-Brown admitted to this avian. "You get your money's worth of Crispin. You get to meet him and get your freaky photo with him. He'll sign stuff. It's a good value for the patron."

    But for those promoting and hosting the event, not so much, according to Beesley-Brown. The lion's share of the take went to Glover $14 out of the $18 ticket price, and Glover's food, in-town travel, and sundry expenses were covered by the event's promoters. Glover required a regular diet of sushi, and had the promoters man his merchandise booth and police the crowd for possible bootleggers filming his surreal, Luis Buuel-esque film with smuggled-in camcorders. There is but one 35mm print of the film, as Glover has opted not to release it on DVD. So piracy issues are a constant concern to the bizarre star.

    The turd in the proverbial punch bowl wasn't so much the financial arrangements, but having to deal with Glover's sometimes prickly, demanding persona. A couple of incidents in particular left a bitter aftertaste, insisted co-promoters Amy Young of Perihelion Arts gallery on Grand Avenue, Stephanie Carrico of the Phoenix performance-art venue Trunk Space, and Matt Yenkala, proprietor of Chandler Cinemas, a struggling indie multiplex offering $2 second-runs and revival fare such as Monty Python double features and screenings of bone-tinglers from Italian horror master Dario Argento.

    In other words, Yenkala's Chandler Cinemas ain't making no big money, and neither are scrappy art-fart types like Young and Carrico. Perhaps that's why Glover's demand for his split in cash each night of the showing socked it to their collective pocketbook.

    "We're a struggling business," Yenkala related to this yardbird. "We're doing our very best, but we weren't in a cash-ready position. So we had to scramble as bit."

    Another problem was that many of the tickets had been sold online through a service that paid the promoters only after the fact. So when Glover demanded to be paid up-front for that first-night ticket sales or he wouldn't go onstage the promoters freaked out.

    "I was furious!" recalled Beesley-Brown. "It's very difficult for us to come up with all that because we have to pull money from the safe, from the box office, from wherever we can. So finally Matt managed to get all that money and give it to Crispin."

    Later, while the film was being shown, Glover was in the Chandler Cinema offices, meticulously counting his newly acquired wads of moolah, Beesley-Brown recalled.

    "He wanted it in all the nice, new bills because he takes his money to the Czech Republic, where he has land or a castle or something," Beesley-Brown claimed he told her. "Apparently, he has to take all the nice bills over there because the Czechs won't take ripped bills."

    Glover's personal take for the three nights was close to six grand, plus whatever he made off his merchandise, which seems like fairly measly pickings by Hollywood standards. True, Glover ain't no Brad Pitt, but he did appear in the recent box-office winner Beowulf as the monster Grendel, along with co-stars Angelina Jolie, Anthony Hopkins, and John Malkovich.

    Glover also scored the promise of another $610 from Yenkala after an alleged meltdown in which Glover accused the theater's young projectionist of messing up a small portion of his film, reducing her to tears, according to Yenkala and others present.

    "He built himself up into this very stressed state of mind, pacing and gradually raising his voice, not really letting anyone have a word in edgewise," stated Yenkala. "He made it clear that he felt we had damaged his film and wasn't going to be satisfied until we agreed that we were going to pay for the replacement."

    Yenkala reluctantly agreed to the demand to placate the persnickety character actor, even though Yenkala doesn't believe the film was damaged on his premises.

    This mockingbird e-mailed Glover about the whole episode, and the agitated B-lister immediately called Yenkala and accused the cinema owner of trying to ruin Glover's career by talking to the press. Glover eventually e-mailed The Bird back, giving his side of the kerfuffle.

    "I did not yell at or even have a conversation with the projectionist other than getting the details of how my print was handled," wrote Glover. "My entire conversation after the show on Sunday was with Matthew M. Yenkala about the technical aspects and procedure that led to damaging reel five of my film."

    Glover went on to explain, in detail, his basis for concluding the film was damaged by the projectionist, and his theory about why the promoters are unfairly criticizing him. (You can read Glover's e-mails and the promoter's e-mails on the Feathered Bastard blog.)

    Glover also asserted he was nothing but professional during his sojourn in Sand Land, and that getting paid in cash up-front was part of his e-mailed requirements to the promoters before the event. (Apparently, there was no formal contract.) Yenkala provided The Bird with a copy of Glover's technical "rider" for the appearance, which didn't include a demand upfront for the loot. When e-mailed this rider by The Bird, Glover responded with his own version, which included a demand for payment in cash.

    Yenkala responded that Glover's version wasn't what he received from the actor, and Carrico forwarded a copy of an e-mail from Glover to the promoters containing the version of the rider sans the cash request. All the promoters say Glover's insistence on a cash payment was new to them on the first night of his Chandler presentation.

    This isn't the first time Glover's pitched a fit over the showing of his art-house masterpiece. In 2005, the Tucson Weekly detailed how Glover "flipped his lid" at Tucson's Loft Theater "after he learned that his directorial debut, What Is It?, was going to be shown in the smaller upstairs theater rather than in the cavernous main auditorium for the last two days of its week-long engagement."

    And Glover's known (and in some quarters beloved) for his eccentric behavior, like the infamous 1987 incident in which he kicked his platform shoes perilously close to David Letterman's head during an appearance on Late Night, exclaiming, "I'm strong . . . I can kick."

    Glover's also had his beefs with Hollywood big shots like Steven Spielberg, who executive-produced Back to the Future, wherein Glover played milquetoast dad George McFly, father of Michael J. Fox's character, Marty McFly.

    According to the Internet Movie DataBase (IMDb.com), when Glover turned down the offer to reprise the role in Back to the Future, Part II, the producers, who again included Spielberg, "brought the character back to life by splicing together archived footage and new scenes (using an actor in prosthetic makeup)." Glover successfully sued Spielberg over the issue. IMDb.com notes, "The case prompted the Screen Actors Guild to devise new regulations about the use of actors' images."

    Glover maintained the grudge, it seems. In a compendium of outr articles edited by Adam Parfrey, titled Apocalypse Culture II, Glover has one that poses several outlandish questions concerning his cinematic bte noire, including, "Could anal rape of Steven Spielberg be simply the manifestation of a cultural mandate?" And, "Would the culture benefit from Steven Spielberg's murder, or would it be lessened by making him a martyr?"

    Yet Robert Zemeckis, director of the Back to the Future films, was willing to work with Glover again in Beowulf, which Zemeckis also directed. But some who've dealt with him here in Arizona feel differently.

    "If he's all about the indie spirit and stuff, like he says, I really think he should be a little more generous toward the venues where he shows his film," offered Beesley-Brown. "Especially for putting up with him."
    Phoenix News - The Bird needles Crispin Glover over his alleged meltdown at Chandler Cinemas - page 2

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