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  1. #71
    Man for all seasons dynamiteninja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cascademn View Post
    Henry James as INFP...hmm...well, maybe that's why while I love his books (am reading one right now, actually!), when reading them I feel like I'm having to concentrate and focus intensely on what he's saying and describing. I 'get it', but it is a workout for my brain. In contrast...reading Dostoyevsky or Maugham or Tolstoy is something that totally flows for me. I don't have to concentrate nearly so hard. Makes sense - Fi as it is unleashed in novel form is quite different from Ni unleashed.
    That's exactly how people should experience books. It's good that you can confirm the types of these authors in this way (although no one has ever disputed the ones in question before).
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  2. #72
    AKA Nunki Polaris's Avatar
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    Here are a few thoughts on some of the authors you listed.

    Stephen King--I really don't think he's an INFP. I've watched a few of his interviews, and he seems to have two basic attitudes. The first is serious and almost harsh--not at all Feeling--and the other is a playful friendliness that looks like Fe. These same qualities are reflected in his writing, so I'm going to guess that he's an ?NTP.

    JK Rowling--I think she's about as far from an ISFP as it gets. She comes off as extroverted in most interviews, and she has a wild, quirky imagination that strikes me as intuitive. A Sensor would be focused on action and the tangible (which are not really her strong points), not on the nature of the afterlife and the power of love. She's definitely a Feeler: her writing and her life are both very values-driven. I'm not sure whether she's a Judger or a Perceiver. She describes herself as disorganized (as you can see on her website, which is based on a photograph of her desk), and her writing gives me Ne vibes (suggesting she's an ENFP). On the other hand, she plotted seven books many years in advance and stuck to her plans, which points toward Judging.

    Orson Scott Card--He's obviously intuitive. I don't think anyone who has read his books would argue with that. His writing (particularly his self-righteous rants) has an Fi quality, in that it's focused on his inner moral convictions instead of something of a more intellectual or outward nature. I'm going to place him as an ?NFP, probably an extravert, given how fond he is of controversy.

    Frank Herbert--Based on how his son describes him, I'm going to guess that he was an ENTJ. According to his son, Herbert tended to dominate conversations (E). As far as the J goes, Herbert was very anal about being left to write at his appointed time, and he was prone to manipulate his children through outrageous means (such as hooking them to a fake lie detector that he made).

    Dan Simmons--I could see him as an ISTP. His writing seems much more focused on the physical and the active side of things (the last two books in the Hyperion Cantos are especially Se). There is definitely some intuition there, I'll agree, but I think it can be credited to tertiary Ni.

    Oscar Wilde--I find it impossible to see him as an ENTP. To me, he comes off as a classic INFJ.

    Philip Pullman--I agree. He's definitely an INTJ.

    Anne Rice--I also think she's an INFJ.

    C. S. Lewis--I could see him as an INFJ.

  3. #73
    Man for all seasons dynamiteninja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nunki View Post
    Here are a few thoughts on some of the authors you listed.

    Stephen King--I really don't think he's an INFP. I've watched a few of his interviews, and he seems to have two basic attitudes. The first is serious and almost harsh--not at all Feeling--and the other is a playful friendliness that looks like Fe. These same qualities are reflected in his writing, so I'm going to guess that he's an ?NTP.

    JK Rowling--I think she's about as far from an ISFP as it gets. She comes off as extroverted in most interviews, and she has a wild, quirky imagination that strikes me as intuitive. A Sensor would be focused on action and the tangible (which are not really her strong points), not on the nature of the afterlife and the power of love. She's definitely a Feeler: her writing and her life are both very values-driven. I'm not sure whether she's a Judger or a Perceiver. She describes herself as disorganized (as you can see on her website, which is based on a photograph of her desk), and her writing gives me Ne vibes (suggesting she's an ENFP). On the other hand, she plotted seven books many years in advance and stuck to her plans, which points toward Judging.

    Orson Scott Card--He's obviously intuitive. I don't think anyone who has read his books would argue with that. His writing (particularly his self-righteous rants) has an Fi quality, in that it's focused on his inner moral convictions instead of something of a more intellectual or outward nature. I'm going to place him as an ?NFP, probably an extravert, given how fond he is of controversy.

    Frank Herbert--Based on how his son describes him, I'm going to guess that he was an ENTJ. According to his son, Herbert tended to dominate conversations (E). As far as the J goes, Herbert was very anal about being left to write at his appointed time, and he was prone to manipulate his children through outrageous means (such as hooking them to a fake lie detector that he made).

    Dan Simmons--I could see him as an ISTP. His writing seems much more focused on the physical and the active side of things (the last two books in the Hyperion Cantos are especially Se). There is definitely some intuition there, I'll agree, but I think it can be credited to tertiary Ni.

    Oscar Wilde--I find it impossible to see him as an ENTP. To me, he comes off as a classic INFJ.

    Philip Pullman--I agree. He's definitely an INTJ.

    Anne Rice--I also think she's an INFJ.

    C. S. Lewis--I could see him as an INFJ.
    King: The debate with him is more or less over him being an INTP, or an INFP. You make a good case for INTP, perhaps I shall move him to the undecided category for now.

    Rowling: how does JK come across as extroverted in any interviews? And Ps can plan too you know! As for S/N, she sees issues more in black and white, pointing to S.

    Scott Card: Certainly N I can agree on. As there are no other suggestions as to his type, under ENFP he goes (at least for now).

    Frank Herbert: Clearly NT, and despite having heard suggestions for INTP and INTJ as well as ENTJ, I like your argument. Will add to the list.

    Simmons: I'm unfamiliar with him and his work, but I prefer your argument to some of the others. Added.

    Wilde seems very much the ENTP to me.

    C S Lewis: Most people agree on him being INTJ I think.
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  4. #74
    Senior Member Cronkle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamiteninja View Post
    Obama is most likely ENTP, but good news for you, Charlie Rose is an ENFJ.

    And yes, the explanation you give is the most likely reason for the dearth of ENFJ writers. Lol. You've obviously thought about these things for yourself, I don't think I can further enlighten you (a good thing).
    Why do you say Obama is ENTP and Charlie Rose ENFJ?


  5. #75
    Man for all seasons dynamiteninja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cronkle View Post
    Why do you say Obama is ENTP and Charlie Rose ENFJ?

    Earlier discussions on the board.


    My earlier reasoning on JKR:

    An S is more likely to create a complete and fully fledged liveable world like she did. An N would leave more to the imagination. She leaves little for us to surmise ourselves. What isn't known, she knows, she just hasn't written it in a book. It's also less high fantasy that an N would create. It's very grounded in reality. She doesn't introduce any "out there" concepts that an N might into her work. It's all borrowed from elsewhere.

    But if she isn't ISFP, then I say ENFP.
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  6. #76
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    Maya Angelou, an almost archetypal INFP.

  7. #77
    Man for all seasons dynamiteninja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lotr246 View Post
    Maya Angelou, an almost archetypal INFP.
    How?
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  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamiteninja View Post
    How?
    There is no how! It is self-evident! No, but reading her autobiography, and her poetry it seems pretty clear. She seems to have, as Keirsey calls, "the ugly duckling complex" as a child. She seemed very dream-like as a child, too. Writes in a very lyrical style. Very sure of her values. Look at interviews. Oh, and in her autobiography, she identifies with Shakespeare. Of course, everyone could, but Shakespeare is a quintessential INFP. What was your hunch?

  9. #79
    AKA Nunki Polaris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DN
    Rowling: how does JK come across as extroverted in any interviews? And Ps can plan too you know! As for S/N, she sees issues more in black and white, pointing to S.
    She's quite talkative and animated in a lot of the public appearances I've seen of her. I also remember watching an interview where she kept playfully interrupting her co-interviewee. And yeah, I agree that a Perceiver can be a meticulous planner, since I'm a Perceiving (albeit weakly so) writer who also plans far in advance. For the S/N part, I don't personally see it that way. To me, seeing things in black and white has much more to do with J/P than N/S (see ENTJs, who are very black-and-white thinkers), although I agree that N/S can be a factor.

    But I would be careful about placing too much weight on my assessments, since a lot of them are based on a gut feeling backed up by very scant evidence.

  10. #80
    Senior Member the state i am in's Avatar
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    i agree somewhat. j types have extraverted judging as their first function so the first thing the world sees is the constant sense of yes/no to everything. as they mature they learn to gather more information and reach more complex decisions, perceptions, etc, some sometimes so much that the idea of a decision in general seems like a theoretical gaffe in itself.

    i think N vs S is more about the leaps vs the smooth straight sensuous curves of an S. just kind of sinking into metaphor and spinning your tires trying to get out.

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