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  1. #31
    Man for all seasons dynamiteninja's Avatar
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    YouTube - Stephenie Meyer Talks About Twilight, New Moon, and Eclipse

    Stephanie Meyer. Type anyone? She seems E at least. I haven't read the books so couldn't comment further.
    4w5 sp

  2. #32
    Senior Member placebo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamiteninja View Post
    YouTube - Stephenie Meyer Talks About Twilight, New Moon, and Eclipse

    Stephanie Meyer. Type anyone? She seems E at least. I haven't read the books so couldn't comment further.
    Probably an F too. I dunno either. Sigh

    Sylvia Plath has got to be an N. She's just intense like that, and etc.

    [YOUTUBE="esBLxyTFDxE"]Lady Lazarus[/YOUTUBE]

  3. #33
    Man for all seasons dynamiteninja's Avatar
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    Umberto Eco: xNTx
    Stephen King: INxP
    Dan Brown: INFJ
    Last edited by dynamiteninja; 01-12-2009 at 01:48 PM.
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  4. #34
    Man for all seasons dynamiteninja's Avatar
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  5. #35
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Laura Ingalls Wilder...ISFJ, not an N. You can make cheese after you read Little House on the Prairie. Everything is straight out of real life.
    edcoaching

  6. #36
    Man for all seasons dynamiteninja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcoaching View Post
    Laura Ingalls Wilder...ISFJ, not an N. You can make cheese after you read Little House on the Prairie. Everything is straight out of real life.
    Okey doke. Changed it.
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  7. #37
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    Laura Ingalls Wilder has to be ISFP, not ISFJ. She's totally Fi.

  8. #38
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heart View Post
    Laura Ingalls Wilder has to be ISFP, not ISFJ. She's totally Fi.
    I could go either way but in the books Mary I think is portrayed as the ISFP and Laura isn't quite that, well, altruistic. Since they're autobiographical Laura's gotta be a little different?
    edcoaching

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcoaching View Post
    I could go either way but in the books Mary I think is portrayed as the ISFP and Laura isn't quite that, well, altruistic. Since they're autobiographical Laura's gotta be a little different?
    Laura's mother seems more ISFJ and Laura definately rebelling against mother and siding with P type father most of the time. P type father gives her the understanding to see herself and her restlessness as OK. Laura wants to follow her impulses and this provides interesting conflict when shown in the constraints of the times for young women.

    Mary seems less restless, more settled and complacent than Laura.

    Why would an ISFJ be less altruistic than a ISFP? Altruism was a very socially acceptable quality in a woman at the time, wouldn't the ISFJ's Fe make them be altrusitic as well?

  10. #40
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    I put François-René de Chateaubriand as either INFP or INTP.

    Here's an interesting comparison of him with Dostoevsky(INFJ):
    Though both underwent similar transformations of their hearts through their faith in Christ, Chateoubriand and Dostoevsky developed different Christian world-views. Chateaubriand developed a dualistic view of Christianity. The fallen world, which is ruled by Satan, remains separated from God's spiritual world, the kingdom of heaven. Thus life in this sinful world is utterly painful, despairing and meaningless. The ideals of Christianity, including love, peace and joy, will only be realized in heaven. Chateaubriand believed that "the Christian always looks upon himself as no more than a pilgrim travelling here below through a vale of tears and finding no repose till he reaches the tomb" (Chateaubriand, 1976, p.297). Only Christians can be hopeful that they will die soon and enter into heaven, where they will experience redemption and the eternal bliss of communing With God....

    ... At the end of his life Chateaubriand stated, "As it grew, my religious conviction has devoured my other convictions, (but) in this world there is no more believing Christian and no more doubting man than I" (ibid.)....

    Chateaubriand grew up during the rise of religious doubt and atheism of the Enlightenment, as he described in Le Genie du Christianisme: "Religion was attacked with every kind of weapon, from the pamphlet to the folio, from the epigram to the sophism. No sooner did a religious book appear than the author was overwhelmed with ridicule, while works which Voltaire was the first to laugh at among his friends were extolled to the skies" (Chateaubriand, 1899, p.124). Many philosophes, such as Denis Diderot, Jean le Pond d'Alembert and Voltaire, were skeptical of the Christian faith because they believed it was based on superstition and irrationality. Enlightenment thinkers assumed that the problems of humanity and society could be solved simply through the application of laws and reforms based on human reason. Many during the "Age of Reason aspired to positivism and scientism, and not to faith in God, as the hope for humanity. When the French Revolution broke out in 1789, angry revolutionaries destroyed stained glass windows, religious statues and entire cathedrals to make the statement that the Catholic Church must be extirpated since it represented the oppression and corruption of the fallen monarchy.

    ...Chateaubriand debated against the notion of the Enlightenment that humanity is by nature rational, as he said, "Man's heart is the toy of everything, and no one can tell what frivolous circumstance may cause its joys and its sorrows (Chateaubriand, 1899, p.124). He vehemently disagreed with the idea that rational reforms would solve humanity's problems because he saw the inhuman violence of the French Revolution, Chateaubriand believed it was his mission to show that Chris- tianity was a divinely inspired religion. He argued that the aesthetic beauty of Christianity including the mystical rituals and the ornate cathedrals proved that only God could have inspired Christianity. Through his writings Chateaubriand called France to return to its Christian faith, values and traditions.

    Christianity in Literary Creation: Chateaubriand and Dostoevsky

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