User Tag List

First 1234513 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 131

  1. #21
    Lex Parsimoniae Xander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    4,463

    Default

    Ok that OP list was a little skewed. I'm glad Wildcat brought in the historical context because I would have thought that those leaders of continent spanning wars which have set the boundaries of countries and set up problems like Israel would be more influential. It seems that the list is comprised of those who came up with things which led to influential things, kind of like those who laid the foundations. Wouldn't it be interesting if they applied the same priorities to architects and venerated those pouring concrete.

    Anyhow I define influential as those who exhibited most torque on today's psychosomatic world (as in subjective and not objective), As such those people who set down what is the foundation stones of the societies in which we live. Those who drew up the constitution, the first laws, thought up how to divide land and wealth. Their influence above all others pervades our every existence from minute to minute.
    Isn't it time for a colourful metaphor?

  2. #22
    Plumage and Moult proteanmix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Enneagram
    1w2
    Posts
    5,514

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Well, the list is the History Channel's -- not anyone here's list.

    And it covers a span of 1000 years. And it was 100 people, so I'm not sure what sort of people were in #11-100. (I would expect Ghandhi to be in there somewhere, for example.)

    Most of the influential people outside of this century would either be scientists, artists, explorers, religious figures, or... military/royalty? Pioneers who went "someplace new" and advanced human culture. And many of these would have been N's, and especially NTs where science is concerned.

    I wonder what the percentages were like in the other 90 as far as these categories go.
    I guess it depends on whose history you ascribe to. I'm not a fan of the History Channel because they showcase a very narrow spectrum of history. This reminds me of when I was in high school and took world history. Most of it was European history that only spoke of other people when Europeans made contact with them. Not much better in college either. Funny I learned more a more well rounded history through my English classes than any history book.

    Pioneers...right. Advancing is questionable as well.

  3. #23
    Guerilla Urbanist Brendan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    911

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cerpin_Taxt View Post
    Gavrilo Princip.

    I think one could certainly make a convincing argument for him being the most influential person of the 20th century -- certainly one of the most influential, although a massive world conflict was inevitable I think.

    But of the whole millenium i'm not to sure about that. Why do you think this?
    I don't think he was the most influential, but WWI certainly had massive ripples that we still feel today.
    There is no such thing as separation from God.

  4. #24
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Splittet View Post
    Do you think all influential scientists and philosophers were INTPs? I have seen you type these people before, and you seem to base it upon their thoughts, which you always think are INTP, and not the personality of the thinker. I think at least Newton was INTJ. Keirsey seem to think so too: The Scientific Revolution

    Let me quote: "Issac Newton was a reasonable man as long as he didn't have to suffer fools. This attitude made him appear as both an arrogant man and a humble man at the same time. This is not surprising, for he is one of the iconic examples of the personality temperament, called Rational, in particular a Mastermind. Masterminds are not concerned with ideas, for their own sake, as much as the Architects, but rather are interested in ideas for their use and utility in reality. And Newton had no use for useless or wrong ideas, and for those people who could not see what was obvious to him. However, Newton saw far -- farther than anybody else in his age."
    No I dont think that all great scientists and philosophers were INTPs...just a lot of them... maybe I could even say most of them..though not quite sure about that one yet..

    I think Newton was probably an INTP because he had this long absent minded streak like Einstein and Adam Smith..

    The other day when he was working on his experiment his servant brought him dinner, and his friend came by and ate it. When he snapped out of it, he said..wow..if it wasnt for the proof I would have sworn that I didnt eat today.

    As a child he was unusually solitary and unsociable. Rarely concerned with making his ideas practical or making a difference in the real world.

    His ideas were very much akin to the rationalists epistemic methodology, that pure reason can help you solve just about anything. An INTJ would be much more empirical than that.

    Newton wasnt much of a planner, and when he was doing his work he wasnt sequential about it, he would just dive right into the midst of things at the same time. He often lost track of time as well. I dont see a lot of J in his lifestyle based on the short writings about him that I've read...and his work resembles something like a Ti would produce..

    I could tell you more about my reasoning concerning his real life and his ideas that led me to type him as an INTP and not an INTJ...but I think that's enough for now..

    I agree the way Keirsey described him he sounded like an INTJ...(seeing far than anybody ..seems like Ni...Ni sees farther than all..they are our great visionaries of history) and how he didnt want to suffer fools or had no patience with useless ideas..

    The way Keirsey describes him it sounds like he had no patience with ideas that cant be applied..I dont think this is true of our great scientist..seems to me that he had no patience with illogical ideas..ideas that dont shed light onto the big picture...the big state of nature...INTPs and their Ti have the least patience of all with illogical ideas..and little patience with people not seeing the big picture (Ti-Ne)..Ti feels like its destined to answer the biggest questions and Ne just wants to keep a constant 'tower' view of everything...

    As for not wanting to suffer fools..applies to INTPs too doesnt it? How we have little patience with people who just like to talk non-sense or small talk on and on...and most of all those who are illogical as aforementioned...

    I think if Newton was an INTJ he probably wouldnt be so concerned with figuring the laws of nature just for the sake of figuring them out...he'd probably want to come up with a new vision for everyone follow...like Nietzsche for instance...and I dont think he'd be such a great admirer of the mathematical method...he'd probably rely on Intuition a lot more..as Introverted Intuition is their dominant function..

    I am not sure...Keirsey's description is misleading..he really painted him as an INTJ when he shouldnt have..based on what I know of Newton he sounds like an INTP more than any other type..
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  5. #25
    Wannabe genius Splittet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    632

    Default

    Basically I think you fail to realize that you don’t have to be a certain type to figure out certain things. INTPs are not the only type capable of being logical. Newton was an extraordinary genius, with an IQ in the area of 190. Even if he was an INTJ, he would still kick your ass in using Ti.

  6. #26
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    ...I didnt say that he was an INTP only because he made all of those discoveries but because of the way he made them(the way he thought) and the way he lived his life...Because of the habits in his personal life and in his thought.

    I dont think that you have to be an INTP to make great discoveries..Plato was an INFJ..and Kant an INTJ..
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  7. #27
    Wannabe genius Splittet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    632

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    I dont think that you have to be an INTP to make great discoveries..
    I am not saying you are saying that. From what you have written so far I would guess it is your opinion an INTJ would be a very unlikely candidate to make for example abstract mathematical discoveries though. If you think so I think you are wrong. I see intelligence as far, far more important. Would it be impossible for INTJs to make great discoveries in fields heavily dominated by logic? I don’t think so at all, not if the INTJ in question was intelligent enough.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Cerpin_Taxt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Well, the list is the History Channel's -- not anyone here's list.

    And it covers a span of 1000 years. And it was 100 people, so I'm not sure what sort of people were in #11-100. (I would expect Ghandhi to be in there somewhere, for example.)

    Most of the influential people outside of this century would either be scientists, artists, explorers, religious figures, or... military/royalty? Pioneers who went "someplace new" and advanced human culture. And many of these would have been N's, and especially NTs where science is concerned.

    I wonder what the percentages were like in the other 90 as far as these categories go.
    Some others on the list: Ghandi, Stalin, Mao, Napolean, Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, The Beatles, John Locke, Rene Descartes, Thomas Aquanis, Adam Smith, Benjaman Franklin, Thomas Edison, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Alexander Graham Bell, Alexander Fleming, Genghis Gahn, Bill Gates, Da Vinci, Freud, Michelangelo.

    I do agree with Wildcat it's a quite impossible task to define and then decide the most influential person of the last 1000 years -- and I not saying I agree with the list. But thats why I thought it would be an intersting conversation starter, although I shouldn't be suprised that a thread on a predominantly NT board quickly turned to semantics.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Opivy1980's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Here are my top ten, I'm guessing this is more what you were after?

    1. Copernicus
    2. Machiavelli
    3. James Watt
    4. Eli Whitney
    5. Henry Ford
    6. Prince John (Magna Carta)
    7. Columbus
    8. Bill Gates and Steve Jobs
    9. Martin Luther
    10. political philosophers (Marx, Locke, Jefferson, Robespierre) etc.
    Question everything especially yourself.

    Opivy1980

  10. #30
    Senior Member Bushranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Alas the territory of Genghis was sparsely populated.
    Not much influence there per capita.
    His empire was larger than the Roman empire at one point. Some estimates say that in certain areas he killed nearly half the overall population.
    The current structure of central Asia was greatly influenced by the nature of his expansion. Now a very heavily populated area.

    He had a lot of descendants though.
    They are found in Europe and America in great numbers.

    These however descend from the antecedents of Genghis.
    The gene pool is not exactly a private property.
    Genetically he was the most successful human being we know of. Genetic success extends to aiding the bloodlines of kin.


    Twentieth Century Atlas - Historical Body Count
    I'll get you my pretty, and your little hermit crab too!

Similar Threads

  1. Most overused phrases of the last 5 years
    By Elfboy in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 261
    Last Post: 09-20-2015, 10:59 PM
  2. Wth? How come I'm not the Advocate's person of the year? srsly
    By Beorn in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-17-2013, 07:18 PM
  3. The Guts of the Last Priest
    By Mole in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-22-2011, 08:07 AM
  4. What you've learned about the theory of personalities in the last 6 months?
    By UnitOfPopulation in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 06-09-2010, 01:26 AM
  5. December 31st, 2008 Conjunctions - Last chance of the year...
    By runvardh in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-30-2008, 11:59 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO