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Thread: Out of Africa

  1. #81
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Langrenus View Post
    Interesting, although I can't pretend to fully follow more than half of that.

    When did the bear emerge as the symbol of 'the' King? Note the bold - Britain was not unified in the time you're talking of...
    "Arthur the King" doesn't imply that there was only one king...it's just to distinguish between him and "Arthur the Short-Order Cook."

  2. #82
    Senior Member Langrenus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat
    The sign of the bear is the emblem of the King.
    That does imply there was only one king (or that the bear was universally accepted as the emblem of all kings). As far as I'm aware the bear was an emblem of one king leading one tribe.
    January has April's showers
    And 2 and 2 always makes a 5

  3. #83
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    We define the nominative as the subject.
    Hence the accusative of the nominative is the genetive.

    The sign of the bear is the emblem of the King.

    If you are a descendant of the King after two direct lines of descendancy (=by the maternal and the paternal line simultaneously) you bear the double emblem of the sign of the bear.
    A tradition of long standing.

    The history is found in the Indo-European etymology and custom.
    Originally borrowed from the Finno-Ugrian neighbours in the early second Millenium BC.
    Location: Southern Russia.

    Etymology.
    In the accusative case the velar (a clusile) component is lost.
    If the accusative case assumes the place of the nominative case, the velar component is lost in the nominative case also.

    Greek: arktos
    Latin: ursus

    If we discount the dissolvement of the velar the difference is in the line of orthography only.

    Arkt-Ursus> Arthurus > Arthur.
    Definitely the King.

    The Bear-Bear.

    There was a lot of interbreeding between the Celts and the Vikings at the period.
    Also the Norsemen and the Danes interbred.

    Hence Atchison is a descendant of Arthur the King.
    Across the Norwegian line of the House of course.
    I did a bit of reading about this. The Atchisons (by various spellings) are a sept of Clan Gordon, which traces its origins to Normandy. Apparently a Gordon came to the British Isles with William in 1066. The claim I found online was that the Atchisons were associated with the English/Scot borderlands, which I fear would have made them Reivers...a clannish, insular lot, given to farming, trading both over and under the table, smuggling, and the odd bit of highway robbery when they could get away with it.

    Robbing the English, of course.

  4. #84
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Langrenus View Post
    Interesting, although I can't pretend to fully follow more than half of that.

    When did the bear emerge as the symbol of 'the' King? Note the bold - Britain was not unified in the time you're talking of...
    An interesting question. I should put the question the other way around: When did the bear lose the symbol of the king?

    If a man has the name of Arthur and he is a the King.. the etymology refers to the bear and to first line of royalty.

    The name has a Germanic outfit. The Germans originally lived what we know as the southern part of Scandinavia.
    They practically lived in boats. From what we know as Denmark and Skane they spread via the North Way (>Norway) up to what we know as The White Sea to the mouth of the river Viena. They traded and interbred with the Permians.
    We know this because they have Siberian genes brought by the Permians. There is also the Sagas.

    The White Sea Permians interbred with the Viena Finns. It has been suggested they spoke Finnish at the time of the Norsemen.

    Finns have a Siberian father line and a Germanic mother line.
    Their word for King is of Germanic origin: Kuningas. -ing refers to belonging. Kun means family (kun>kyn>kin; kun > kwen): the implication = Kuningas is a member of the royal family.
    A Finnish tribe in the North under a Norwegian supremacy was called the Kwens. It means they were brought under the lordship of the Norwegian royal line.
    Kwen is a female form with a double meaning. You are subjected under the house of the King or you are the Consort of the King (kwen > Queen).

    Now we know that the Norsemen in the North are more than fifty per cent of Finnish lineage. How many Finns there were among the Norsemen?
    All of them spoke the old form of Norwegian.
    Today the bulk of the Norwegians speak a kind of Danish. It is absurdly called the Norwegian language.

    What has the symbol of the King to do with the unification of Britain?
    The Britain of the Viking age was an island. There were many Kingdoms.
    The King was the King within the confines of the Kingdom.

  5. #85
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Langrenus View Post
    That does imply there was only one king (or that the bear was universally accepted as the emblem of all kings). As far as I'm aware the bear was an emblem of one king leading one tribe.
    There was one King within the confine of one Kingdom.

  6. #86
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon67 View Post
    I did a bit of reading about this. The Atchisons (by various spellings) are a sept of Clan Gordon, which traces its origins to Normandy. Apparently a Gordon came to the British Isles with William in 1066. The claim I found online was that the Atchisons were associated with the English/Scot borderlands, which I fear would have made them Reivers...a clannish, insular lot, given to farming, trading both over and under the table, smuggling, and the odd bit of highway robbery when they could get away with it.

    Robbing the English, of course.
    The history of the Normans prior to the invasion is a short story.

    When I checked your sources I came across an idiotic claim stating that the Normans were not Vikings.


    They became agriculturalists (in the true Viking fashion).

    They adopted a vernacular they mistakenly called French.
    So what.

    They traded peace for land.
    This is what the Vikings did.

    They tilled the soil.
    Their ancestors had tilled the soil for two millenia.

    The migrant Norwegians did not have more than a handful of women with them.
    Hence they exacted ransom: Should the ransom not be met they would have the women.
    The ransom was land.
    The Viking policy.

    In the way of genetics and culture, Britain did not differ from any part of the North of the Pyrenees.
    This is what we call the Occident.

    The Occidentals heard of systematic agriculture first from the retired Roman generals.
    The Romans initiated cultivation on both sides of the Channel.

    Septimus Severus alienated the British war lords by betrayal.
    His son Caracalla brought Rome to ruin.

    Meanwhile the retired Roman generals had obtained the land on both sides of the Channel.
    When they were threatened by the Norsemen they sold land for peace.

    Who was Arthur?
    The Duc of the Duce if you ask me.



    There is a number of scholars who confuse the Danish and the Norwegian invasion.
    This is because at a later time in history the Danes conquered all of Norway.
    They introduced in the archipelago their own rule. Danish became the Lingua Franca.
    This does not mean the Danes were peaceful in the Viking period.

  7. #87
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Originally I did not place much stock for Greenberg.
    I read his books.

    I overlooked.

    He lingered in my head for fifty years.

    What Greenberg wanted to say was that linguistics is about semantics and hence about culture.

    Is biology about genetics?
    No.

    Genetics is about biology.

  8. #88
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    The haplogroup K is considered the northern paternal macrogroup. However it was born in India. It was the paternal haplogroup of those who built The Indus Valley Civilization? Today the primary derivative K>L is the common haplogroup among the Brahmin Telugu.

    An example

    Image:Krishnamurti 100 years.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  9. #89
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    The Creation Myth and its Origins

    of which the most famous is the Genesis of the Bible of course.

    It is advisable to read the stuff in a foreign language because you know it already. You heard it in the Sunday School a thousand times.

    How about Basque? Read it in Basque.

    You learn Basque at the same time. You never know when it becomes handy.
    One day you take a trip to Bilboa and find a nice Basque dame there and fall in love. And what if you do not know Basque? You are in trouble.

    I help you. Google Old Testament wikipedia or even New > Euskara > biblia osoa euskara batuan > Hasiera > zeru lurren kreazioa.

    Has 1 - BIBLIJA.net - the Bible on the Internet

  10. #90
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    You are exasperated now, eh? King James refreshes your memory.

    Genesis Chapter 1

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