User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6

  1. #1
    across the universe Olm the Water King's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    459 sx/so
    Socionics
    EII
    Posts
    1,583

    Default Putin: Russia Was Ready for Nuclear Confrontation Over Crimea

    Putin: Russia Was Ready for Nuclear Confrontation Over Crimea | News | The Moscow Times

    Putin: Russia Was Ready for Nuclear Confrontation Over Crimea

    Reuters
    Mar. 15 2015 19:16
    Last edited 08:39

    Moscow was ready to put its nuclear forces on alert to ensure Russia's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine last year, President Vladimir Putin said in a pre-recorded documentary aired on Sunday.

    Putin also said that Russia had saved the life of Ukraine's former pro-Moscow president, Viktor Yanukovych, who he said had been in danger after 'revolutionaries' seized power following weeks of violent street protests in Kiev last year.

    "For us it became clear and we received information that there were plans not only for his capture, but, preferably for those who carried out the coup, but also for his physical elimination. As one famous historical figure said: 'No person, no problem,'" Putin said.

    Protests over Yanukovych's decision to back away from a trade agreement with the European Union in favour of closer ties with Moscow forced him from power in February last year. Yanukovych's overthrow ultimately prompted Russia to seize and annex the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea.

    "Of course it wasn't immediately understandable (what the reaction would be to Crimea's annexation). Therefore, in the first stages, I had to orient our Armed Forces. Not just orient, but give direct orders," he said.

    When asked if he had been ready to put Russia's nuclear forces on alert, he said: "We were ready to do it."

    The film, shown across Russia ahead of the first anniversary of Russia's annexation of Crimea, documented the seizure of the peninsula and provided details of Yanukovych's last hours in Ukraine before he fled to Rostov-on-Don, in southern Russia.

    Putin said Yanukovych had called on Feb. 21 last year to lay out plans to leave the capital, where violent street protests had been raging for weeks.

    "I told him my point of view that, in such a situation, it's best not to leave the capital," said Putin.

    From Kiev, Yanukovych travelled to Kharkiv, then on to Donetsk, where he called Putin to ask for help.

    Putin suggested meeting him personally in Rostov-on-Don, but Yanukovych's plane was not given permission to leave. He then travelled to Crimea, from where he was spirited to Russia.

  2. #2

    Default

    I wonder if they could hear themselves if they would stop themselves?

    The Russians have become that embarrassing violent family who neglect their delinquent kids and when they arent dodging cops or social workers because of unabashed domestic violence and boasting to uninterested and intimidated passersby about how hard they are.

    Dickheads.

    I couldnt believe it when I heard that in response to questions about Putin being ill, I mean the press enquiring over the health and welfare of a national leader here, officials had said he could break bones with a handshake.

    Who gets on like that? Seriously?

    I think they would use nukes because they're a bunch of asshats who wouldnt think about the long term consequences of doing so.

  3. #3

    Default

    Seems more like him posturing, following in the footsteps of North Korea. He’s always wanted to be viewed as a hardcase. I’m sure he enjoys his reputation as a man who breaks bones with a handshake (which I find hilarious).

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nos4a2 View Post
    Seems more like him posturing, following in the footsteps of North Korea. He’s always wanted to be viewed as a hardcase. I’m sure he enjoys his reputation as a man who breaks bones with a handshake (which I find hilarious).
    Which I'm pretty sure a lot of people find hilarious, in elite circles and among the populations of countries other than Russia too, I cant believe that Russians themselves still buy all that macho bullshit.

    Its like the english speaking world in the eighties with Rambo, Rocky and all those sorts of archetypes.

    Pathetic and dangerous.

  5. #5
    Head Pigeon Mad Hatter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    -1w sp/sx
    Socionics
    IOU Ni
    Posts
    1,028

    Default

    I'm meeting a friend tomorrow night who said repeatedly, "For years, the West has played Russia for a fool by including former Soviet member states into NATO. What the West doesn't understand is that Russia has an incredible desire for stability, and now they are reacting to a situation which to them feels like encirclement." Added to that, he is critical of Ukraine's new government has hinted at the fact that he thinks the former legitimate government has been thrown over in part by fascists.

    I do not agree with much of it. It is true that some fascists are have taken part in the Euromaidan protests, and I grant him that. But at the same time, just take a look at Putin's government, and especially the Nashy youth movement, and you will find fascists even more easily there than in Kiev. Also, it's not like any of the countries which are new NATO members have been forced in any way to join; they did it out of their own free will. If anything, Russia's behaviour in Ukrain proves to me that they were right in doing so, and I thought that even before Putin revealed his invasion plans a couple of weeks ago.

    Stating that he had been ready for a nuclear war fits this picture - not in the sense that I think he would have seriously considered it. He's far too much of a realist for that. But now that it's over, and that there is no more risk in stating it, he can safely throw his weight about, probably more for his own people than for the international public.
    IN SERIO FATVITAS.

    -τὸ γὰρ γράμμα ἀποκτέννει, τὸ δὲ πνεῦμα ζῳοποιεῖ-

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Hatter View Post
    I'm meeting a friend tomorrow night who said repeatedly, "For years, the West has played Russia for a fool by including former Soviet member states into NATO. What the West doesn't understand is that Russia has an incredible desire for stability, and now they are reacting to a situation which to them feels like encirclement." Added to that, he is critical of Ukraine's new government has hinted at the fact that he thinks the former legitimate government has been thrown over in part by fascists.

    I do not agree with much of it. It is true that some fascists are have taken part in the Euromaidan protests, and I grant him that. But at the same time, just take a look at Putin's government, and especially the Nashy youth movement, and you will find fascists even more easily there than in Kiev. Also, it's not like any of the countries which are new NATO members have been forced in any way to join; they did it out of their own free will. If anything, Russia's behaviour in Ukrain proves to me that they were right in doing so, and I thought that even before Putin revealed his invasion plans a couple of weeks ago.

    Stating that he had been ready for a nuclear war fits this picture - not in the sense that I think he would have seriously considered it. He's far too much of a realist for that. But now that it's over, and that there is no more risk in stating it, he can safely throw his weight about, probably more for his own people than for the international public.
    I think that the rest of the world has to just wait out the craziness when it comes to this kind of thing, maybe in a few generations when there's been enough forgetting of mythologised greater russian history it'll all be a different story. Plus Putin can only live so long and putting his entire people on that there's anyone threatening the world with aramageddon besides him is only going to work for so long if there's no one reacting to it.

    Putin needs the west to confirm his propaganda.

    A lot of this is sort of hard for the rest of the world to understand because its like something from the distant cold war past to them, the machismo, the posturing and sabre rattling, none of that would particularly sell domestically within the west if western governments were to act that way so it just appears, well, strange and bizarre.

    If some how the Russians could get that feedback in a way that doesnt cause them to feel all shamey again as they have all said they felt at the collapse of the USSR and after.

    Although the scary thing is the extent to which the public have bought their state's message and considering whether or not Putin is capable of the sort of provocation which cant be ignored by the rest of the world. I think the guy would start a war if he thought it'd stabilise his regime for a few more years for him.

    For years, from Yeltzin's government era, I thought the Russians had potential to be a new threat, they had some pretty cookie generalisimo types around then too.

    As a socialist I really cant stand the outbreak of nationalisms globally and locally, its the one ideology on the rise.

Similar Threads

  1. Russia or America for Finland?
    By wildcat in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 10-28-2008, 01:33 AM
  2. Palin not ready for interviews, but ready for the vice presidency?
    By ajblaise in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 09-07-2008, 10:54 AM
  3. Ready for Chimeras?
    By heart in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-08-2008, 03:30 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO