User Tag List

First 364445464748 Last

Results 451 to 460 of 534

  1. #451

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    From Time: What’s Behind Baltimore’s Record-Setting Rise in Homicides

    The ferguson effect in practice.
    Cops who refuse to do their job because they can no longer do it with impunity are precisely the ones who should not do it in the first place. The black sheep are outing themselves.
    Likes Anaximander, Ivy liked this post

  2. #452
    President of the Galaxy Anaximander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sp/sx
    Socionics
    EII Fi
    Posts
    8,207

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Cops who refuse to do their job because they can no longer do it with impunity are precisely the ones who should not do it in the first place. The black sheep are outing themselves.
    thank you
    INFP 5w4, 9w8, 3w4

    Fi > Ti > Ne > Ni > Si > Te > Se > Fe

  3. #453
    Meat Tornado DiscoBiscuit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    12,381

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Cops who refuse to do their job because they can no longer do it with impunity are precisely the ones who should not do it in the first place. The black sheep are outing themselves.
    It may have something to do with cop's not unreasonable fear that they are liable to be put on trial in the court of public opinion regardless of how well they do their jobs.

    Damned if they do, damned if they don't.

    It has seemed like the public wanted less police involvement, and now they're getting it.
    Your representative owes you, not his industry only, but his judgment; and he betrays, instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinion.
    - Edmund Burke

    8w9 sx/so

  4. #454

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    It may have something to do with cop's not unreasonable fear that they are liable to be put on trial in the court of public opinion regardless of how well they do their jobs.

    Damned if they do, damned if they don't.

    It has seemed like the public wanted less police involvement, and now they're getting it.
    indeed. it goes far beyond merely holding officers accountable for misconduct, of which some are guilty. every cop now faces the looming threat of being politically vilified to appease an angry mob, despite the actual details of any given altercation.

    the most recent example of this is in boston where an eyewitness claimed the police shot a man in the back while he was on his cell phone. video footage shows him approaching the officers, allegedly with a knife, while they backed up with their guns drawn before shooting him. the footage was shown to community leaders in order to subdue the inevitable protests that would've erupted based on the testimony of the "eyewitness." had there not been footage of this situation, you can be sure the officers in question would've been prematurely branded as murderers, just like darren wilson was. shining a spotlight on every individual instance of police misconduct is intentionally portraying cops, in general, as violent, murderous brutes. it doesn't take into account what sort of effect it's having on society's perception of law-enforcement when the majority of good cops go completely ignored in the public eye in favor of focusing on police corruption. this inevitably affects the morale of police officers, as a whole, and makes them wary of risking their lives in an already dangerous profession.


  5. #455
    Senior Member ceecee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    8,322

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    It may have something to do with cop's not unreasonable fear that they are liable to be put on trial in the court of public opinion regardless of how well they do their jobs.

    Damned if they do, damned if they don't.

    It has seemed like the public wanted less police involvement, and now they're getting it.
    Agreed. Authorities seem to feel they're all hopped up on the prescription drugs that they stole and there is a war for those buyers. I have doubts that this is as big of a reason as they're saying but they can't say that the cops are just going...fuck it, right?

    Batts: Looted Drugs Fueling Deadly Turf Wars « CBS Baltimore

    Just before anyone asks, my father was a cop for 20 years and with the State Department for another 20 so, I understand the law enforcement side. I also prefer waiting for all the evidence before making a judgement.
    I like to rock n' roll all night and *part* of every day. I usually have errands... I can only rock from like 1-3.

  6. #456

    Default

    This is a good write up on the overall situation in Baltimore.

    What's Causing Baltimore's Crime Spike?

    As activists blame cops, police blame prosecutors, and the commissioner blames drugs, citizens are left to deal with the consequences.

    Baltimore residents seem to be facing an impossible dilemma: They can have abusive policing, or hardly any at all.

    The first option was abundantly well-documented in the days after Freddie Gray’s death: the history of rough rides and brutality; the repeated inattention to emergencies; the unwise tactical decisions. Since the city exploded, then calmed down, residents are starting to get a feel for their other choice.
    ADVERTISING

    As The Baltimore Sun noted over the weekend, May saw the most murders in any month in Charm City since 1972. Non-lethal shootings have gone up sharply as well. But arrests are down across the city—there were 1,177 arrests in May 2015, as compared to 3,801 in May 2014. The idea that lower arrests are ipso facto a bad thing should not go unchallenged: Critics of broken-windows style policing say that there have been too many arrests for petty or irrelevant crimes. Such overly aggressive policing has driven a wedge between the community and the cops. Freddie Gray was almost certainly a victim of excessive arrests—he was detained only for running away from police, and the the prosecutor and officers differ on whether the knife they found in his pocket once he was handcuffed was legal or not.

    But Baltimoreans in places like Gray’s neighborhood of Sandtown didn’t say they wanted no policing. NPR talked to West Baltimoreans who complained that calls they placed to 911 to complain about crimes have gone without any response—sometimes dozens of them.

    Yet no one can pinpoint what exactly is behind the spike in crime and dive in arrests. Those residents and some civil-rights advocates think the police are intentionally backing off of enforcing crimes—like going on a strike, but not as radical. A slowdown would be to both punish citizens for lashing out against the police and also to create a sort of cautionary statement: This is what your streets will look like without cops. Is that really what you want?

    A notable example of a police slowdown came in New York City early in the year, when cops—upset at Mayor Bill de Blasio’s implication of racism in policing—basically stopped arresting people. But the NYPD slowdown was notably different in several respects. First, and perhaps most importantly, the move was a tremendous propaganda failure. Crime actually fell during the slowdown, reducing arrests actually played into the mayor’s strategy, and public opinion swung against the police. The spike in crime in Baltimore looks very different. Second, NYPD officers were a little more open about what was happening. While no union declared a slowdown, the police commissioner acknowledged that’s what was going on and cracked down on it.

    In Baltimore, neither the Fraternal Order of Police nor Police Commissioner Anthony Batts say there’s a slowdown. That’s notable because Batts and the FOP have, by and large, been at each others’ throats since the Gray protests.

    ...

    Continued: Crime Spikes in Baltimore After Freddie Gray Riots: Is a Police Slowdown to Blame? - The Atlantic
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it
    Likes Ivy liked this post

  7. #457

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post

    It has seemed like the public wanted less police involvement, and now they're getting it.
    If this is what you conclude the public wants, after all the riots, and protests against police brutality, then you haven't been paying attention, or failed to be objective about it.

    The public wants police to do their job, not to act with impunity, and abuse their power. Police are in service to the public, not the other way around. With that responsibility, granted by the citizens, comes an oath to not abuse and misuse the power. If they fail to do it, the public has every right to call them out (their mode of 'calling it out' can be called into question, but complaining that the public does not have the right to call the police out is harmful and dangerous to society, the antithesis of why a police force is created in the first place!)

    The public wants responsible and just police involvement, not less police involvement. The reactionary stance of the Baltimore police makes a loud and clear statement. "There is nothing wrong in how we conduct ourselves. So if you do not like it, we will stop."

    That is not constructive, that's destructive, and reeks of entitlement. Like children who refuse to play if their toys get taken away, pouting in the corner. Except we don't hire cops to play games. We pay them to do their job.

    The last lines basically sum it up:

    But can it really be that citizens have to choose between living with rampant crime, or accepting racially slanted policing that arrests, incarcerates, and marks with a criminal record a disproportionate share of African Americans? That’s no choice at all.
    Likes Osprey, Beorn, Ivy liked this post

  8. #458

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    The public wants responsible and just police involvement, not less police involvement. The reactionary stance of the Baltimore police makes a loud and clear statement. "There is nothing wrong in how we conduct ourselves. So if you do not like it, we will stop."

    That is not constructive, that's destructive, and reeks of entitlement. Like children who refuse to play if their toys get taken away, pouting in the corner. Except we don't hire cops to play games. We pay them to do their job.
    the police want responsible and just involvement of the legal system and not politicians who pander to the emotions of an irrational mob. that's what the reticence of the baltimore pd is in response to. interestingly, baltimore prosecutor marilyn mosby wants to block the release of freddie gray's autopsy report.

    despite accusations of various conflicts of interest and her public use of political rhetoric to appeal to the masses, apparently, she doesn't want the public to know the facts about the autopsy. which doesn't bode well for her credibility.

    Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby is seeking a protective order to block the release of Freddie Gray's autopsy and other "sensitive" documents, according to a report.
    A defense attorney for one of the charged officers said Mosby's efforts are suspicious and indicate that "there is something in that autopsy report that they are trying to hide."

    "...to ask for a protective order is beyond disingenuous," Attorney Ivan Bates, who is representing Sgt. Alicia White, told the Sun. "It's as if she wants to do everything to make sure our clients do not get a fair trial."

    Bates further described the move as two-faced.

    "If your case is as good as you said it was, why don't you just show the evidence? ...You can't holler and say, 'I'm about accountability for the citizens,' and then run around filing for a protective order."

  9. #459
    President of the Galaxy Anaximander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sp/sx
    Socionics
    EII Fi
    Posts
    8,207

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    It may have something to do with cop's not unreasonable fear that they are liable to be put on trial in the court of public opinion regardless of how well they do their jobs.

    Damned if they do, damned if they don't.

    It has seemed like the public wanted less police involvement, and now they're getting it.
    there is some truth in this....but...


    it can't be denied that law enforcement generally attracts certain types of people who perhaps enter the profession for the wrong reasons.
    INFP 5w4, 9w8, 3w4

    Fi > Ti > Ne > Ni > Si > Te > Se > Fe

  10. #460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pixie sticks View Post
    the police want responsible and just involvement of the legal system
    What a coincidence, so does the public! Especially when it comes to responsible and just enforcement of the law!

    and not politicians who pander to the emotions of an irrational mob. that's what the reticence of the baltimore pd is in response to.
    So, the emotions and the 'irrationality' of the mob is the main issue for the police, not the root cause of it?

    How interesting. How deflecting.

    How...not surprising.

    It is not like the autopsy is being ruled as inadmissable for the trail. Both sides, the prosecutors and the defense attorneys of the accused police officers, will have access to the autopsy report for the trial. Only thing is, nothing about the report can be presented to the media and the public.

    That's not call hiding evidence. The mob, neither the public, nor the police, nor the media, will decide on justice based on half-information, interpretations, and whatever else they decide to focus on. It is in the hands of the court. Which is where the evidence is relevant, and the only place where it will be released. What's so suspicious about that?

    despite accusations of various conflicts of interest and her public use of political rhetoric to appeal to the masses, apparently, she doesn't want the public to know the facts about the autopsy. which doesn't bode well for her credibility.
    Or....she doesn't want this man's death to further become another ball to be thrown around in this media circus. Because the police, and the public, does not seem to have a good grasp of objectivity around this case. As evidenced by...the reality of the situation thus far.

Similar Threads

  1. The Funny Video Thread
    By disregard in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 875
    Last Post: 12-12-2016, 07:20 PM
  2. The Never Ending Thread
    By ygolo in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-20-2016, 04:50 PM
  3. The lame jokes thread
    By Sahara in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 211
    Last Post: 05-27-2015, 03:29 AM
  4. The Entertain Niffer Thread
    By niffer in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 69
    Last Post: 07-04-2007, 02:29 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts