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View Poll Results: Are you personally offended by the picture?

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  • Yes absolutely. It's offensive and done in bad taste.

    3 8.82%
  • I find it very distasteful, but I'm pretending I'm not personally affected.

    2 5.88%
  • eh... I can understand people being offended but I really just don't care.

    12 35.29%
  • No, people can't tell people when to smile in pictures or not. It's just a picture.

    16 47.06%
  • I probably would have done this tbh.

    3 8.82%
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  1. #21
    Paranoid Android Video's Avatar
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    I have no doubt she will feel ashamed when she gets older. Some of the ways in which I thought or didn't think when I was 12 are appalling now, too, because I can appreciate the subtleties in retrospect. Although she can't be held responsible for understanding what she did at an adult depth, it's an opportunity for her to be introduced to that understanding by those older who do get it - to start growing up. The lesson should sting.

    Teaching her is her family's private business, though, IMO, because the mistake was between family. The extra publicity feels cynical. It's communal human nature to bond as a group over all being angry the same thing, and young generations have longtime been a safe and popular target for that. Stories about youths that at least seem to support the stereotypes of them that we love to hate are easy click bait.
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  2. #22
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nixie View Post
    Teaching her is her family's private business, though, IMO, because the mistake was between family. The extra publicity feels cynical. It's communal human nature to bond as a group over all being angry the same thing, and young generations have longtime been a safe and popular target for that. Stories about youths that at least seem to support the stereotypes of them that we love to hate are easy click bait.
    In general, I agree with you; but at the same time, the problem is that she publicly put this picture out there (beyond the reaches of her family), so now it's a public thing, not a personal thing. Again, this is another artifact of "The Internet Age" -- she posted what was really a personal/family moment in the public sphere due to the nature of Twitter, and this is what happens -- people constantly are getting themselves burned by releasing personal information and experiences into the public sphere.

    My perception though is that much of the assault is coming from people who are seeking for things to be offended by. There will be some individuals who might find it painful just to be reminded of such locations if a loved one a few generations back died there (it was a horrific chapter in the story of humanity), but it's all part of the "trolly" nature of the 'net nowadays to find something that can press people's hot buttons, to stir up some interest, excitement, anger, and whatever else. After people get their kicks from righteous indignation abusing this girl for her naive social faux pas, they will surf ahead and find something else next week to feel intensely charged about.
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  3. #23
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    I wasn't aware that there was proper selfie etiquette. I think this is just phoney outrage from the PC brigade - lots of twisted people out there just itching to be "offended" so they can attack someone. The selfie tweeter should tell these people to go F themselves.
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  4. #24
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    It takes this to get people to realise how mindless selfies are?

    (another "the world is f***ed" moment)

    However: Auschwitz is a tourist attraction and I don't see why people shouldn't take photos there. You may as well object to people taking pics in the Coliseum because people had to fight to the death or were ripped apart by caged animals there, all in the name of entertainment.

  5. #25
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    @Jennifer, that is true. If I were one of the first connections of hers to see the photo, then, I might have foresaw the shitstorm and suggested to her that she take it down and text it to family instead.

    When someone gets virally burned or trolled on the internet, my observation is that it almost invariably is someone who shared something that would not have been publicly viewable before the outlet of the internet and especially online social media. Sometimes what is "overshared" is genuinely weird, but too often it is common and relatable human stuff from a shadowed side of human nature that has been politely kept behind closed doors for centuries. I think the repulsed public reaction is more about us not being used to seeing something in the open than it is about the thing itself.

    Not sure what it is about the internet that makes it feel more private than life when it's actually potentially far less private - perhaps because it is silent, faces are hidden, and reactions to one's content come less immediately. An obvious rule of thumb would be not to say things on the internet that you wouldn't be comfortable telling everyone you know, but even among reasonable people, few follow that. Whatever the case, we're still (clumsily...) adjusting to the medium as a people.
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  6. #26
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    Totally agree... and the medium itself is about 20 years old (in terms of the web-interface Internet)... and some of these apps far younger than that. We've also got multiple generations of people interacting in that same medium, as well as people from all walks of life, countries, cultures, religions, etc.

    Normally in real life, we tend to live in pockets -- we're surrounded by people who are to some degree similar to us, whether family, friends, people in our occupation, etc. But the Internet, people WAAAAAY outside your pocket can see your stuff. So the Christian who mouths off about gay people might be able to get away with it at church (or the gay person mouthing off about religious people in a LGBT friendly community the same), but those words are no longer restricted to the people within proximity -- they travel the world.

    Yet, like you say, it's so easy to forget -- because all those people are nameless and faceless. And their anonymity also frees them up to respond in ways they might not respond IRL because there is no real punishment for delivering a disproportionate response to an individual you will likely never meet, if you even know who they are IRL.
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  7. #27
    Senior Member riva's Avatar
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    I went to a concentration camp in austria.

    Took many pictures smiling with my kith and kin.

    Good lord i didn't take any selfies.
    .

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Totally agree... and the medium itself is about 20 years old (in terms of the web-interface Internet)... and some of these apps far younger than that. We've also got multiple generations of people interacting in that same medium, as well as people from all walks of life, countries, cultures, religions, etc.

    Normally in real life, we tend to live in pockets -- we're surrounded by people who are to some degree similar to us, whether family, friends, people in our occupation, etc. But the Internet, people WAAAAAY outside your pocket can see your stuff. So the Christian who mouths off about gay people might be able to get away with it at church (or the gay person mouthing off about religious people in a LGBT friendly community the same), but those words are no longer restricted to the people within proximity -- they travel the world.

    Yet, like you say, it's so easy to forget -- because all those people are nameless and faceless. And their anonymity also frees them up to respond in ways they might not respond IRL because there is no real punishment for delivering a disproportionate response to an individual you will likely never meet, if you even know who they are IRL.
    Yeah, if anything this is a fascinating example of the wild effects of this still (even 20+ years and counting) mystical technology called the Internet.

    The power of the web, I think I fully realized after the Egyptian revolution. Which was like, more or less, accelerated by facebook and twitter. There's been other examples.

    So you may have heard of this movie, Disconnect, which is supposed to be a really good depiction of society and the information overload that is the Web. Plan on watching soon.
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hard View Post
    She has no emotional connection to aushwitz, and therefore disregarded it.
    I find your misspelling and lack of capitalization in 'Auschwitz' highly offensive.

  10. #30
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    I like @Jennifer's point that it's a personal moment launched into a public sphere. I don't find it particularly offensive because I don't know how she feels deep down about the concentration camp... That she has visited it demonstrates some degree of interest and respect to begin with. And it is hard to be in such a sad and frightening place... Sometimes people respond with lightheartedness to ease the heaviness of that kind of experience. But in a public sphere, I think it's easy to see how it can be interpreted as disrespectful. The reaction from most people is probably stronger than warranted, but for those who have particularly heavy emotional connections to Auschwitz, I can see why it would be a frustrating and/or hurtful photo. I'm not really in line with any of the poll options - I'm not personally offended but I think it would have been better left unshared for both her sake and the sake of her audience.

    I think she's young, and understanding of what is good to "publish" to the outer world and what is better kept private is something that tends to come with time and experience. "Know your audience" seems relevant here, as well as feeling secure in oneself and not feeling a need to submit every experience for public affirmation - which may not have been the case here, but I believe often is in this sort of controversy. I was in charge of keeping an eye on my sorority's Facebook PR for a while, and this topic came up a lot. There is a fine balance when it comes to posting something that may be offensive. Social media sites are a personal self-expression and identity playground and scrapbook, but they are also a public soapbox and our actions there can affect thousands and spiral out of our control. Our rule of thumb was when in doubt, keep it private and share it selectively. Our identities and experiences shouldn't have to be restricted by others' opinions, but our identities and experiences are not defined by social media, which is an important differentiation.

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