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View Poll Results: Gender Studies

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18. You may not vote on this poll
  • It's diploma worthy

    4 22.22%
  • It has scientific value

    2 11.11%
  • I'm a feminist and I find this question offensive

    1 5.56%
  • Rasofy needs to check his male privilege

    2 11.11%
  • It's not diploma worthy

    5 27.78%
  • It has close to zero scientific value

    9 50.00%
  • It's a piece of crap

    6 33.33%
  • I'll just pick this neutral option and watch

    2 11.11%
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Thread: Gender Studies

  1. #1
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Default Gender Studies

    Should people be getting a diploma for studying that?

    I mean, they spend 2(?) years of their life reading biased sets of p.c. researches, and basically all they learn is how to say check-your-privilege in an eloquent way.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    I chose two options:

    - It's diploma worthy
    - It has close to zero scientific value

    Because I know how academia really works.

  3. #3
    Senior Member OWK's Avatar
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    Gender Studies could in fact have tremendous value as a science, if it focused on identifying and characterizing the fundamental functional differences between the male and female brain. Clearly such differences exist (subject of course to the same statistical distributions that govern all human qualifications). Men are generally better spacial thinkers, and have a greater geographical sense. Women are generally better at recognizing social signals, and with lingusitic skills. Why do these differences exist? and how did they come about from an evolutionary standpoint?

    These are interesting questions.

    What are profoundly uninteresting questions, are generally those pursued by what I understand to be today's academic genre of "Gender Studies". These appear to me, to be yet another in a long line of post-modern professional victimhood training sessions.

  4. #4
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    I chose two options:

    - It's diploma worthy
    - It has close to zero scientific value

    Because I know how academia really works.
    Yeahhh ditto Nico. I don't think it provides much scientific value beyond what biology, chemistry, psychology, and sociology have already covered. If anyone can demonstrate that it has, I'd be impressed.

    It could be something really good. Too bad my boyfriend's Gender class had him read fucking Twilight as part of a discussion of women's literature.

    It could have useful biology-biochemistry-psychology-sociology-political science-history overlaps.

    But I think it would be better as part of a larger field of study of human difference and variation. Marking it as gender-focused just gets gender-hyped people all itchy in their underoos.

  5. #5
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm interested in it. in fact some one gave me a ton of anthropology and sociology books on gay and gender studies. I'm excited to read them. But do I think it's going to change the world in a scientific way? no socially? possibly. I mean if we can understand the history of the gender construct we have more of a chance of understanding why it exists and what parts could we realistically do a way with, ie what parts are outdated.


    I really don't expect to change the world, my goal is to understand the world. Especially large populations, which is why I want to go into sociology.

    also the only thing I can vote is it has no scientific value. The feminism one I could, except I don't find the question offensive at all
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  6. #6
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    Yeahhh ditto Nico. I don't think it provides much scientific value beyond what biology, chemistry, psychology, and sociology have already covered. If anyone can demonstrate that it has, I'd be impressed.

    It could be something really good. Too bad my boyfriend's Gender class had him read fucking Twilight as part of a discussion of women's literature.

    It could have useful biology-biochemistry-psychology-sociology-political science-history overlaps.

    But I think it would be better as part of a larger field of study of human difference and variation. Marking it as gender-focused just gets gender-hyped people all itchy in their underoos.
    Gender Studies should not be a separate major or diploma, but rather a legitimate focus of study within existing departments, for those faculty and students interested in the topic. Its main benefit might be to bring together the various disciplines mentioned - biology, sociology, anthropology, etc. - in essentially a multidisciplinary study.
    Last edited by Coriolis; 05-26-2014 at 01:49 AM. Reason: fixed word
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  7. #7
    likes this gromit's Avatar
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    I know I'm a little biased against academia that is more theoretical/humanities... so I don't really know the purpose of such a degree. Seems like it's very hard to get a job after and, therefore, hard to justify the cost for such a degree.

    I don't think there's anything wrong with doing it, but it might not be the wisest career move.

    At the same time, I do see the collective value of such research and exploration in the humanities for society. So I am glad it exists.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    I chose two options:

    - It's diploma worthy
    - It has close to zero scientific value

    Because I know how academia really works.
    Not all of academia is humanities bullshit.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  9. #9
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    Not all of academia is humanities bullshit.
    But all of it is concerned with self-justification. I agree, however, that the humanities need more of it than the hard sciences.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    But all of it is concerned with self-justification. I agree, however, that the humanities need more of it than the hard sciences.
    Hard sciences fix themselves over time. Humanities do not. There is no self-correcting mechanism in humanities.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

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