User Tag List

First 45678 Last

Results 51 to 60 of 73

  1. #51
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    INFj None
    Posts
    9,827

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xisnotx View Post
    You have as much downward control as you could ever wish for. That's my point..

    If you can afford it, that power is...at the least, a power..

    Like I said, if you're young, with no obligations...isn't it wiser to pursue the power...

    That 50k job isn't going anywhere.

    But that billion dollar paycheck is, if you're young.

    ????
    I am confused about what you're proposing.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  2. #52
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    I am confused about what you're proposing.
    Trust me...I'm just as confused.

  3. #53
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    INFj None
    Posts
    9,827

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xisnotx View Post
    Trust me...I'm just as confused.
    Always good to have common ground to start from.

    FWIW, I've been in a non-working poor family, a working poor family, a working class family, and a non-working non-poor family. IME working class>working poor>non working non poor (because it wasn't sustainable)>non-working poor.

    If you do the working poor thing, you have a better shot at making it to working class. Total indigence is generally pretty rough, especially if you are able-bodied. Clinton's welfare reforms cut what safety net we had all full of holes.

    Also, FWIW, my husband says if he was in his twenties, he'd train as a diesel mechanic. Anything that gets you dirty, takes some skill, and can't be outsourced is a safeish bet. But you absolutely have to plan for retirement because those aren't jobs you can probably do in your seventies. You either have to have money to live on put back or you have to pay other people to do the work for you.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  4. #54
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INtp
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    5,091

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xisnotx View Post
    Why wouldn't you just stop working? I mean, if you're going to be poor...you might as well take it easy in the meantime..
    Working hard...to be poor. People make no sense to me.

    Unless it's something you like to do...like an artist, or an actress. Then I can understand.
    Or if you have children. That would make sense too.

    But, just you...and you're working? And you're poor? Then stop working! Use your time more wisely, imo.
    Because you if didn't work, you'd just be even poorer.

    There's also a sense of hope that the low paying job will eventually lead to a higher paying one.

    Also there is the sense of feeling like you're contributing something to society through work, even if it is a low paying job.
    INtp
    5w6 or 9w1 sp/so/sx, I think
    Ravenclaw/Hufflepuff
    Neutral Good
    LII-Ne




  5. #55
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,540

    Default

    Very few of us are self disciplined enough to choose poverty, most of us need external discipline to function.

    Even monks and nuns who choose poverty need the Rule of their Order to function.

    Of course we have swallowed the ideology that we are free individuals, but the reality is that almost all of us can't function without external discipline.

    And external discipline, we are told, is for our own good, and it is.

    Almost all of us prefer to belong rather than be free.

    However removing our chains one by one is an education in itself, but it is not for the faint hearted.

  6. #56
    Ginkgo
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xisnotx View Post
    Why wouldn't you just stop working? I mean, if you're going to be poor...you might as well take it easy in the meantime..
    Working hard...to be poor. People make no sense to me.

    Unless it's something you like to do...like an artist, or an actress. Then I can understand.
    Or if you have children. That would make sense too.

    But, just you...and you're working? And you're poor? Then stop working! Use your time more wisely, imo.
    Income aside, work offers intrinsic value. It keeps you in touch with the rest of the world and throws you into a constructive routine.

    While that doesn't necessarily trump every other factor in a cost-benefit analysis, it's an incentive easily forgotten by unemployed people who lead lives divorced from obligation and commitment.

    Action solves existential anxiety. So why not get payed for it?

  7. #57
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/09/opinio...tml?hpt=op_bn5

    When the richest 400 families in America have more wealth than the bottom 155 million Americans combined, the danger to the republic is far more clear and present than that posed by the "welfare queens" of lore or by anecdotes of shiftless inner-city men.
    I disagree. I think the danger to the republic is primarily found within those groups. France circa 1790s needn't be a historical footnote, you know. It can happen again...make them aware of that. But,

    I think if you overloaded the system with "welfare queens", those "shiftless inner-city men" listened to more, then you'd see a decline in the meaningfulness of that gap...at the very least. You'd probably be brought to the negotiation table...that's all. Because, right now, they're not even listening to you..

    It's a way of taking back power...negotiating a better position for your own life.

    You can work for the system and prop up those 400 families...but maybe you can overload/break the system, causing things to change? Just drop out and over-burden the welfare system.

    Just throwing it out there.

  8. #58
    i love skylights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 so/sx
    Socionics
    EII Ne
    Posts
    7,835

    Default

    Mostly because it's the most realistic stepping stone to higher levels.

    But also, because it's valuable. There's so much to learn... you learn what it feels like to work a 60 hour week at a physically laborious job (damn tired but damn proud). You learn what it's like to get pushed around by shitty management. You learn who to trust and how to deal with people you can't trust. You learn how to budget and how to save. You learn the real value of money, and you learn how having a job you don't like will sap the life out of you over time. You learn that it's not just the income that makes you happy. You learn how to maximize happiness while minimizing cost. You learn what you can live with and what you can't live without. You realize how much an education is really worth when you have to pay the huge chunk of money that accompanies each class, each book, each manual. You understand the plight of people who struggle with poverty and you see the functions the government ideally would exist to provide. It's living without being babied, taking control of your life circumstances and your struggle to live. It's hard, but hopefully you come out of it with compassion for those without resources, perspective to assess and predict the factors that create life quality, and empowerment from having established yourself and pushed yourself forward into where you want to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gingko
    Income aside, work offers intrinsic value. It keeps you in touch with the rest of the world and throws you into a constructive routine.

    While that doesn't necessarily trump every other factor in a cost-benefit analysis, it's an incentive easily forgotten by unemployed people who lead lives divorced from obligation and commitment.

    Action solves existential anxiety. So why not get payed for it?
    I agree immensely with this.

  9. #59
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Socionics
    ENTj
    Posts
    5,908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    Mostly because it's the most realistic stepping stone to higher levels.

    But also, because it's valuable. There's so much to learn... you learn what it feels like to work a 60 hour week at a physically laborious job. You learn what it's like to get pushed around by shitty management. You learn who to trust and how to deal with people you can't trust. You learn how to budget and how to save. You learn the real value of money, and you learn how having a job you don't like will sap the life out of you over time. You learn that it's not just the income that makes you happy. You learn how to maximize happiness while minimizing cost. You learn what you can live with and what you can't live without. You realize how much an education is really worth when you have to pay the huge chunk of money that accompanies each class, each book, each manual. You understand the plight of people who struggle with poverty and you see the functions the government ideally would exist to provide. It's living without being babied, taking control of your life circumstances and your struggle to live. It's hard, but it's empowering.
    No way this is valuable in any rational sense. You waste many years of your life in this state, and you will never get them back. Many people spend their whole life going through hardships of some kind, and then they die in a miserable state. What's the use of that, honestly?

    If you say that it may be a useful experience for someone coming from a well-off family, I may agree, but being a working poor just sucks.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  10. #60
    Senior Member OWK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Posts
    115

    Default

    To become part of the working rich, you must generally start as part of the working poor.

Similar Threads

  1. Does the South actually want to be a part of the United States?
    By gromit in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 07-15-2015, 02:41 PM
  2. Replies: 27
    Last Post: 10-05-2013, 11:44 AM
  3. would you choose to be a miner on an asteroid?
    By jcloudz in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-05-2012, 08:43 PM
  4. [MBTItm] If you get to be a RATIONAL(NT) which type would you choose to be?
    By Riva in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 99
    Last Post: 12-23-2008, 11:46 AM
  5. Would you choose to be born?
    By proteanmix in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 10-09-2007, 05:34 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO