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  1. #11
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    Cool, punishment of the mentally ill, that really helps society a lot. Not to mention being, you know, a really sweet thing to do.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    Cool, punishment of the mentally ill, that really helps society a lot.
    Yes, there is that, too. The man suffered from schizophrenia. And was well-known to the police in the area (i.e., they knew about him, his condition).


    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    "Now see my fists? They are getting ready to fuck you up."

    Talking apes are impressive, eh?

    From what I have read, the deceased was unarmed. Was there Justice? Sure, if you pronounce the word: Just-us. The people who are being served and protected are the police.
    Couldn't agree more.

    The deceased was unarmed, and was schizophrenic, who was known to the cops in the area as he was homeless and known on the streets. He resisted against the officers, which likely incensed them more, but there were six of them, and he was one man, unarmed, who, coupled with being ganged up on, threatened, and with his history of mental illness, might not have made the best rational decision when resisting the officers.

    The price he paid? Beaten to death.

    At the (literal) hands of those who are there to protect and serve.

    Did anyone bother to test the officers for steroids? Food for thought.
    This raises another issue. I'm not too familiar with it, but I'm sure (hopeful) that there are annual drug testing of all officers. How about psychological evaluations? Are they done annually? Or, is it required only when a case is lodged against that specific officer?

    I can imagine that, in this line of work, over time, a certain desensitization may happen. Numbing of feelings. That doesn't excuse it. One must be FIT to work in their job (where required, mentally AND physically), especially a job where others' lives are in their hands.

    Or, how about evaluating for anger management issues?

    The verdict of this case just serves as validation for other cops, that they are invincible, in the eyes of the law. That is a dangerous thing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Standuble View Post
    Have any of you ever served on a jury? I can assure you that unless the case is interesting debating their innocence or guilt is boring as hell. In mine we were locked in a room together for five hours and at the end I didn't care whether she was innocent or guilty I just wanted to get out of there. Two days must have been a nightmare for the indifferent in the room. That being said I would look forward to doing it again.
    For all of our sake, I hope you, never, ever, get picked for jury duty again. This is a dangerous way to think. When you don't give a shit, whether justice is served, as long as any verdict is given, and then, turn around to say that you look forward to doing it again, makes you a hypocrite. And, a dangerous one at that.

  3. #13
    Junior Member blurry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Standuble View Post
    The verdict of this case just serves as validation for other cops, that they are invincible, in the eyes of the law. That is a dangerous thing.
    To quote Thomas' father: "All of us need to be very afraid now," he said. "Police officers everywhere can beat us, kill us, whatever they want. But it has been proven right here today: they'll get away with it."

    As emotionally upset as he must have been, it's true, this sets a horrible precedent. It reminds me of the acquittal of George Zimmerman in a certain way (he wasn't a cop I know, but an equally upsetting acquittal to be sure).

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    "Now see my fists? They are getting ready to fuck you up."
    Yeah, that quote is what gets me most about this whole thing. It's not about serving justice, it's about this guy's ego and a vulnerable man. I mean there were SIX of you and he is a homeless man with a mental illness - and this is an exercise for your macho manhood?

    It just gives cops a bad name, unfortunately. And most cops I've ever dealt with have been fairly respectful and straight up - I don't know where you find guys' like this but I hope it's not in my city...

    "So you say you're under a curse? Well so what, so's the whole damn world."


  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qrious View Post
    For all of our sake, I hope you, never, ever, get picked for jury duty again. This is a dangerous way to think. When you don't give a shit, whether justice is served, as long as any verdict is given, and then, turn around to say that you look forward to doing it again, makes you a hypocrite. And, a dangerous one at that.
    One of the reasons for my apathy was because the jury was at an impasse, we could not prove beyond reasonable doubt of the suspect's guilt yet the room still insisted of getting around this obstacle. Had we not reached a blockage within the first twenty minutes perhaps I would have been more interested or perhaps not.

  5. #15
    Junior Member blurry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Standuble View Post
    Why don't you shut the fuck up?

    One of the reasons for my apathy was because the jury was at an impasse, we could not prove beyond reasonable doubt of the suspect's guilt yet the room still insisted of getting around this obstacle. Had we not reached a blockage within the first twenty minutes perhaps I would have been more interested or perhaps not.
    I don't think trials are ever completely smooth affairs, despite what Law and Order on A&E would tell us. Honestly, posting in a thread about justice that you were indifferent to it being served by a jury you were on isn't really a good way to avoid judgment...

    "So you say you're under a curse? Well so what, so's the whole damn world."


  6. #16
    morose bourgeoisie
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    they murdered that man. America has a police problem...

  7. #17
    Sweet Ocean Cloud SD45T-2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blurry View Post
    It just gives cops a bad name, unfortunately. And most cops I've ever dealt with have been fairly respectful and straight up - I don't know where you find guys' like this but I hope it's not in my city...
    Read some Wambaugh.
    1w2-6w5-3w2 so/sp

    "I took one those personality tests. It came back negative." - Dan Mintz

  8. #18
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Standuble View Post
    Why don't you shut the fuck up?
    I don't care either way, whether I offend you or not with the truth. But, I look forward to judging you again.

    One of the reasons for my apathy was because the jury was at an impasse, we could not prove beyond reasonable doubt of the suspect's guilt yet the room still insisted of getting around this obstacle. Had we not reached a blockage within the first twenty minutes perhaps I would have been more interested or perhaps not.
    Oh, 20 minutes? You even have a timer on your care-o-meter. That restores my faith. Phew!

  9. #19
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Way too many of them are thugs in uniform. Beating an unarmed mentally ill man to death and facing no consequences is not justice.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  10. #20
    Junior Member blurry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SD45T-2 View Post
    Read some Wambaugh.
    I might just do that.

    "So you say you're under a curse? Well so what, so's the whole damn world."


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