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  1. #1
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    Default What are social problems?

    How do you define social problems as distinct from individual problems? Are there just individual problems with social consequences? If there are either social problems or individual problems with social consequences are they endemic and inevitable or eradicable? If social problems are endemic and inevitable what should the response be? Is it possible to have a "palliative" response to social problems?

    Does your view of government or charitable or other responses to problem behaviour correspond to your thinking upon the above questions or some other criteria?

  2. #2
    deplorable basketcase Tellenbach's Avatar
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    It's a subjective preference. For me, I'd say that social problems are those individual problems that are brought about by some societal factor. I would regard mass shootings as an individual problem, but if we later find out that the vast majority of mass murdering shooters are also video game addicts, then that would point to it being more of a social problem.

    Social problems can be dealt with but not eliminated. For instance, you can try to encourage parents to closely monitor the video games played by their children using tv ads.

  3. #3
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    There is no correlation between public shooters and video games. However there seems to be a pretty strong correlation between them being the race, gender and social class who believe that they have the.most right over public spaces. Even the Asian exception was the right gender and social class. When innocent people fear that they or their children could be shot in a public place for no apparent reason at any moment in a first world country that is not at war, you have a form of social terrorism on your hands.

    While women and blacks and Hispanic people generally accept being a nerd or not getting the girl or job you wanted as a part of life, white upper middle class men of a particular psychological make up seem to believe it entitles them to throw public temper tantrums that ruin the lives of complete strangers.

    That's a social problem, and my solution is to stop teaching kids of this social position that they are automatically entitled to any thing more than anyone else is, without real exceptional hard work or talent, and to equalize the adult perps by treating them as the terrorists they are. I bet that would begin to dissuade many of them.

  4. #4
    Unapologetic being Evolving Transparency's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    How do you define social problems as distinct from individual problems? Are there just individual problems with social consequences? If there are either social problems or individual problems with social consequences are they endemic and inevitable or eradicable? If social problems are endemic and inevitable what should the response be? Is it possible to have a "palliative" response to social problems?

    Does your view of government or charitable or other responses to problem behaviour correspond to your thinking upon the above questions or some other criteria?
    It's very difficult to answer this question because like Tellenbach said, it's subjective.



    So to give my subjective answer to this question, I think that some of the major issues we face in the world today are given the "palliative' response.

    I think that the main problem is that people don't take responsibility for themselves. Sure there are individuals that take responsibility for themselves, but on a larger scale, I think that there's less of that happening as a whole.

    If everyone took even a smidget of responsibility for what "happens" to them (even though it seems counter-ego to do so) we would stop this palliative response.

    If people were even a little bit more mindful and just simply asked the question to themselves, "Is this dividing us or bringing us closer together" or "what's the solution?" instead of "what's the problem?" in their every day interactions/routines their decisions would probably really help the next person, and so on.

    I think one of the ways to break a cycle is by being a role model to others. I would say that one of the most important groups of people that could make a significant change in the cycle is parents/teachers. Parents could teach their kids to take responsibility for themselves by modeling it themselves. Also letting kids know that they have a guidance system of their own that they can follow, so that when the kid grows up they can rely on thier own guidance in a situation instead of feeling victimized.

  5. #5
    Senior Member danseen's Avatar
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    Anything that undermines the wellbeing, function or structure of society. at least for me/by my own opinion.

  6. #6
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Social problems are things that affect a group as a whole. Many of these social problems sometimes takes years to see as a problem. In a sense, social problems are individual problems, but individual problems can only be social problems if it affects a particular group or entity.

    Since the forum has been so into mass shootings lately, one can see mass shootings as a distinctively individual problem. But if there seems to be similarities between two different mass shootings, than one can infer that there is a social problem that needs to be address (maybe it is white, male, mental illness, and "entitled" lot)

    Social problems can be addressed by the way we handle them. Just putting more guards or arming TSA agents is just putting band-aid on the problem, not looking into the source of the problem.

    A better example that I can come up with... not sure if it helps with your question or not.

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