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  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    No, I don't think it is ludicrous in the least. In the same way I can propose single payer and price regulations, I would assume you have some idea of what you'd want to see instead of what we have that isn't just a description of what you don't like about ACA.
    I don't have decades of think tank work to rely on like you do.

    I thought that would have been obvious.

  2. #132
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    I'm going to sleep, but I will continue this in the manana.

  3. #133
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    From Ed Rogers over at The Washington Post....

    The Insiders: All health care politics is personal

    The old adage is, “all politics is local.” Well, all health-care politics is personal. And thanks to President Obama and his Democratic allies, today every American adult is anxiously evaluating the personal status of his or her health insurance. In most cases, these people either can’t get any answers or they don’t know if what they are being told is accurate or even truthful. This is big. The Obamacare debacle has become something of a national collective focal point. The entire country is engaged, and it’s not a holiday or a sporting event. It’s more like a natural disaster. A slow motion, rolling disaster — and the storm surge might not peak until November 2014.

    The unintended consequences of Obamacare have only just begun. More and more Americans are receiving health care plan cancellation notices, and it’s possible that the number of cancellations is greater than the number of new enrollees. And between Team Obama’s incompetence and denial, you can bet that no one had a plan to deal with these problems, even if they were warned. It is unlikely they can turn things around quickly. What will the political fallout be?

    Well, you can’t count on the New York Times to tell you what the political fallout might be. Only the New York Times could write a story analyzing voters’ anger and what might be driving the 2014 elections and not even mention “Obamacare.” Not once. In fact, they didn’t even mention the words “health care.” Nope, all they can see is voter anger directed at the Republicans over the shutdown. Is it just me, or does the shutdown appear to have gone a little stale as a political headline?

    Obamacare is a story that has legs. Even if the Web site is running perfectly by the end of November — and that is doubtful — Americans still are going face higher premiums, fewer choices and a lower quality of care. Democrats and their enablers in the media can try to avoid the subject, but the weight of Obamacare on the Democratic ticket is obvious.

  4. #134
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    From Forbes:

    49-State Analysis: Obamacare To Increase Individual-Market Premiums By Average Of 41%

    One of the fundamental flaws of the Affordable Care Act is that, despite its name, it makes health insurance more expensive. Today, the Manhattan Institute released the most comprehensive analysis yet conducted of premiums under Obamacare for people who shop for coverage on their own. Here’s what we learned. In the average state, Obamacare will increase underlying premiums by 41 percent. As we have long expected, the steepest hikes will be imposed on the healthy, the young, and the male. And Obamacare’s taxpayer-funded subsidies will primarily benefit those nearing retirement—people who, unlike the young, have had their whole lives to save for their health-care needs.


    41 states, plus D.C., will experience premium hikes

    If you’ve been following this space, you know that I and two of my Manhattan Institute colleagues—Yevgeniy Feyman and Paul Howard—have developed an interactive map where you can see how Obamacare affects premiums in your state. (If you ever need to find it, simply Google “Obamacare cost map.”)

    In September, we released the first iteration of the map, which included data from 13 states and the District of Columbia. We only had data from a few mostly-blue states because the remainder were mostly participating in the federal exchange, and the federal exchange—for reasons we now understand more fully—hadn’t released any premium information at that time. That analysis found that underlying premiums would increase by 24 percent in those 13 states plus D.C.

    Obamacare’s supporters argue that these rate increases aren’t important, because many people will be protected from them by federal subsidies. Those subsidies aren’t free—they’re paid for by taxpayers–and so it is irresponsible for people to argue that subsidies somehow make irrelevant the underlying cost of health insurance. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand the impact of subsidies on Obamacare’s exchanges; later in September, we released a second iteration of the map to do just that.

    Today’s release, with the third iteration of the map, contains both premium and subsidy data for every state except Hawaii. (Believe it or not, we’ve had success mining data from every exchange website but Hawaii’s.) This nearly-complete analysis finds that the average state will face underlying premium increases of 41 percent. Men will face the steepest increases: 77, 37, and 47 percent for 27-year-olds, 40-year-olds, and 64-year-olds, respectively. Women will also face increases, but to a lesser degree: 18%, 28%, and 37% for 27-, 40-, and 64-year-olds.
    Biggest winners: NY, CO, OH, MA; Biggest losers: NV, NM, AR, NC

    Eight states will enjoy average premium reductions under Obamacare: New York (-40%), Colorado (-22%), Ohio (-21%), Massachusetts (-20%), New Jersey (-19%), New Hampshire (-18%), Rhode Island (-10%), and Indiana (-3%). Most, but not all, of these states had heavily-regulated individual insurance markets prior to Obamacare, and will therefore benefit from Obamacare’s subsidies, and especially its requirement that everyone purchase health insurance or pay a fine.

    The eight states that will face the biggest increases in underlying premiums are largely southern and western states: Nevada (+179%), New Mexico (+142%), Arkansas (+138%), North Carolina (+136%), Vermont (+117%), Georgia (+92%), South Dakota (+77%), and Nebraska (+74%).

    If you’re interested in more details about our methodology, you can find them here. As with our past work, we calculated an average of the five least-expensive plans in every county in a state pre-Obamacare, adjusted to take into account those with pre-existing conditions and other health problems. We then did the same calculation with the five least-expensive plans in every county in the Obamacare exchanges. We then used these county-based numbers to come up with a population-weighted state average pre- and post-Obamacare.

    Exchange plans narrow your choice of doctor, despite higher costs

    The key thing to understand about our before-and-after comparison is that it is an average. If you’re healthy today, you will face steeper rate increases than these figures indicate. If you have a serious medical condition, however, and haven’t been able to find affordable health coverage as a result, you will do much better under Obamacare than the average person. Men will face steeper increases than women in most states, because women consume more health care than men do, and Obamacare forbids insurers to charge different prices on the basis of gender.

    In addition, our comparison ignores other differences between pre-Obamacare and post-Obamacare plans. For example, in some cases, people looking for comparably-priced coverage on the exchanges will need to accept higher deductibles and other cost-sharing arrangements.

    Importantly, post-Obamacare exchange plans will typically have narrow networks of physicians and hospitals, especially excluding those tied to prestigious medical schools. In today’s Wall Street Journal, Edie Sundby, who struggles with gallbladder cancer, argues that her pre-Obamacare access to leading academic cancer centers like Stanford has “kept me alive,” and notes that the plans available to her on the exchange don’t allow her to keep her doctor.


    .......

    This all assumes, of course, that the exchanges eventually work

    Right now, the headlines are dominated with stories about the deep and thorough dysfunction of the federally-built Obamacare insurance exchange. It’s a serious problem. If the exchanges aren’t fixed soon, the likely outcome is that older, sicker, and poorer people sign up, while everyone else goes without coverage. That, in turn, will imbalance the insurance pool in the exchanges, making its products more expensive and subsidy-dependent. Those facing cancellation of their existing coverage face the greatest risk under the worst-case scenario.

    But there is a best-case scenario, especially from the standpoint of the law’s supporters. It’s that the exchanges eventually get fixed, and turn out to be popular, even among the young men—the “bros”—who bear the steepest costs under the new system. If they do, not only will Obamacare be here to stay, but the law could end up evolving into an effective replacement for our older, single-payer health-care entitlements, Medicare and Medicaid.

    From where we stand today, unfortunately, there is no reason to believe that the Obama administration has a handle on the problems with the federal exchange. Young men seem no more likely to buy a costlier insurance product than they were to buy one, pre-Obamacare, that was more affordable. And so we should remain concerned about the likelihood of the law’s ultimate success.

  5. #135
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    Color me unsurprised to see this thread forgotten down on the second page of the politics forum.

    Be glad Ive been too busy studying to post.

    Things have not been going well for the supporters of the ACA of late.

  6. #136
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    In a recent vote to allow insurers to keep non ACA conforming policies in the House, 1 in 5 Democrats voted for the Republican bill, totaling 39 votes from the left.

    Until the Thursday press conference (ie damage control) by the White House, it was rumored that around 100 house dems would vote for it.

    Increasingly, it would seem, things are rotten in the state of Denmark.

    FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 587

    Vulnerable Dems spurn WH on ACA vote

  7. #137
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    From The Washington Post:

    The Insiders: Obamacare shifts voters’ thinking

    A Gallup poll released yesterday says 56 percent of Americans do not believe it is Washington’s responsibility to “make sure all Americans have healthcare coverage,” while 42 percent believe the federal government is responsible. Two years ago, it was a different story. The same poll conducted by Gallup in 2011 showed that 46 percent of Americans believed the federal government was not responsible for making sure all Americans have healthcare coverage, and 50 percent said the federal government was responsible.

    This poll is better news for Republicans than just about any poll I’ve seen in a while. This poll represents a psychological shift that favors Republicans. It is good news for Republicans that a Democratic president has created such a colossal failure. Let’s face it, if voters want to vote themselves more free stuff from Washington, they are more likely to vote for Democrats. The president and his Democratic allies are getting a rude awakening to the realities of what government can and cannot do, and a timely reminder of the political consequences of overpromising and underdelivering.

    I fear the Republican Party being labeled as the “party of no,” but thanks to the failure of Obamacare, the idea that benefits from Washington are free and easy has been contaminated. No one knows what the half-life of this will be, but it has certainly changed the game for a while. As Americans continue to deal with canceled plans and higher premiums and deductibles, their personal experiences and the horror stories they hear from family and friends reinforce their worst cynicism about Washington’s ability to deliver and all politicians’ promises. He who promises the most doesn’t necessarily have the advantage — at least for the time being.

    Polls will come and go, and I probably put less stock in any poll this many months away from an election than some other commentators. I also caution that even these poll results could change quickly. But the political reality that Americans expect the best health care in the world and they pretty much want it for free has been altered. No one believes that will actually happen, and anyone who suggests otherwise will be punished at the ballot box.

    At the risk of gloating over more polling today, the latest Washington Post-ABC News poll shows that 39 percent of voters say that “if a candidate for Congress supports the law [Obamacare], they would be more likely to oppose them.” And just 23 percent say they would be more likely to support a candidate who supports Obamacare. The political poison of Obamacare is spreading down the Democratic ballot. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: In politics, bad gets worse.

  8. #138
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    No doubt, the Obamacare roll out is turning into a small disaster for Democrats. So far it appears to have undone the damage Republicans suffered during the government shutdown at the minimum. (Imagine what would be happening right now if Republicans didn't shut down the government and just let the thing speak for itself from the get-go?)

    Still, this is turning into the lightning rod that Republicans so desperately needed, and I can definitely see this strengthening the party. But, it's early. The effects of the government shutdown were wiped away in 4 weeks. Democrats have some time to mitigate the damage before this could kill them in the midterms.

  9. #139
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    And that's what I've always been afraid of with this bill. It's not like an actual universal health care policy, but it the illiterate politic will be convinced that it is, and as a result, any failure on the part of this bill will make them less likely to endorse a real universal health care system, in spite of the immense practical differences. It's all a part of why I really didn't want the Democrats to half-ass this back in 2010.
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  10. #140
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    At this point, if more people have health insurance at the end of 2014 than at the beginning of 2013, I will consider it a win. It's only a pathetic sliver of a win, but it's something.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

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