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Voters
36. You may not vote on this poll
  • have changed allegiances

    12 33.33%
  • have not

    15 41.67%
  • am not American

    9 25.00%
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  1. #11
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I was raised Religious Right and voted accordingly up to and including both Bush elections. I vote mostly Democrat now.

    I voted for my city's Republican mayor in the last election though. But that's because things got kind of convoluted here politically due to my city's historical labor union ties. For many years, only a Democrat could be elected here, then a fairly strong fiscal conservative ran as a Democrat in order to stand a chance of being elected, so that left someone who appears to be a Democrat, mostly, running as a Republican in order to oust the incumbent. Last election, the Democratic candidate ran on a platform of economic growth for the area, which mostly means massive tax abatements to companies that hire temp workers or pay less than $10/hr, so I didn't vote for that guy, even though I think very highly of his son, who is a city councilman. The factors contributing to the rust belt are not the fault of any one mayor in this country, nor is the recession. It's a silly issue to run on, IMO, so I'll keep voting for the (pseudo-)Republican candidate until a real Democrat is one of my choices.

    If the next presidential election is between Hilary and Chris Christie, I don't know which way I'll vote. The only candidate of either party I've seen recently that I was not convinced is a corporate tool is Ron Paul, but I disagree with him on about 75% of the issues and I think he's a nut.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  2. #12
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    Unless Christie eases up on guns etc.. he won't be debating Hillary in '16.

  3. #13
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    Unless Christie eases up on guns etc.. he won't be debating Hillary in '16.
    Yeah, I didn't think the odds were high.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  4. #14
    Junior Member Meda's Avatar
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    I chose "have changed allegiances" but meant to choose "have not." I have always been primarily a very conservative, pro-Constitution, small-as-possible government Republican with a huge dash of Austrian economics, although I have referred to myself as Libertarian before. I've been interested in anarcho-capitalism every now and again, but I don't think it's realistic or practical. I don't see that the US will get to the point where such a philosophy would be applicable, at least not in my lifetime. I like Ron Paul.

    In every election I have voted Republican or Libertarian.

  5. #15
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    I was raised in a primarily Democratic area, and still vote mostly for Democrats. I go by the individual, not the party, though, and have voted for Republicans over Democrats who were real jerks, or when the Republican's stated goals seemed more likely to result in the kind of society I prefer. Often this has happened in local or state elections. No candidate and no party matches my personal agenda entirely, especially when one considers methods as well as goals. I will vote against someone who supports my goals, but is intent on approaching them in a way I consider doomed to failure, or likely to precipitate even worse problems. I am still waiting for one party (or viable candidate) to champion individual rights over the authority of any level of government or corporate entity. When Republicans start interpreting their mantra of "less government" this way, I will probably vote for more of them.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  6. #16
    libtard SJW chickpea's Avatar
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    I haven't been voting long enough to make a switch, but unless I have some major philosophical crisis later in life I can't see myself voting republican.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowtech redneck View Post
    As a very young man I considered myself a 'radical moderate', and voted for Democrats as often as Republicans.....then I became better educated, and discovered that the Democratic party is opposed to most of what I have come to support (Constitutionally limited government, federalism, etc.). In over a decade, I've only voted for a Democrat in a general election twice.....both times out of gratitude for taking on the Cynthia McKinney machine in the Democratic primary.
    I grew up Republican and have stopped voting for Republicans for the exact same reason bolded above. The smart ones (ie. not Todd Akin) talk a good game before going to Washington, but they do the exact opposite once they've won. I don't think I have ever voted for a Democrat for a federal election, though I probably have for some state and local elections (I don't really pay attention to political party affiliation at those levels).

    I hate the Republican party with a passion and want to see it destroyed, to become a relic of history like the Whigs. Unfortunately, the Democratic party is completely inept so I'm stuck with supporting libertarians for the most part.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  8. #18
    Theta Male Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
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    Raised strict democrat, usually vote democratic. I played around with voting third party once or twice. I strongly considered voting for a Republican on the county level, because he seemed to be doing sensible things.

    I do think political rhetoric on both sides is shallow and simplistic, and it's unfortunate that people support political parties the way they support a football team. I don't like to discuss politics very much because people get very confused and upset if you're not showing your team affiliation clearly enough. I regret that we now have news networks that specifically serve a "liberal" and "conservative" demographic.

    Political rhetoric is designed to be confrontational rather than communicative. The important thing is "to keep up the fight" rather than make any damn sense whatsoever.

    In my early twenties/late teens, I assumed that was because of I lacked information; there had to be something I didn't know or understand.

    I revised my opinion on that.

    This was patently obvious once Democrats started being in power back in 2008, and seeing family members switch from being "firebrand idealists" to "pragmatic moderates".

    The thing I firmly believe, and had believe on some level ever since the invasion of Iraq in 2003, is that just because you have two parties, that doesn't mean one of them must be right. It certainly does not mean that if they both agree on something, they are right. (Thinking of Lewis Black on "bipartisanship" here.)

    I don't think we have a maximum of two choices on any given issue. The the reason it seems that way is mostly a PR trick. (The fact that our government is set up as a de-facto two party system also plays a large role, of course.) The two choices available to us do not represent the "two best options", or even one bad option, and one good one. These options are determine by what will win them the most votes/campaign funds, and not what is the most practial or sensible. I think personal morality enters into it on some level, and it isn't merely a determination of "strategies", but I'll never understand how so many adults cannot conceive of politics as being, well, political. Most people see "politics" as only something the other team does, not the team that has values more in line with your own. Given this, how many solutions to problems exist that are simply thrown in the wastepaper bin because they aren't politically convenient? It's somewhat sad when you consider that possibility.

    My rule of thumb is simply to assume that political rhetoric has nothing to do with truth, nor is it a reliable source of moral positions on contemporary issues.
    [Trump's] rhetoric is not an abuse of power. In the same way that it's also not against the law to do a backflip off of the roof of your house onto your concrete driveway. It's just mind-numbingly stupid and, to say the least, counterproductive. - Bush did 9-11


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  9. #19
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    At 24, I haven't had many opportunities to use my voting rights, though I've been aware of politics since a rather young age.

    I don't believe I've ever supported a Republican. They have only become a party I would want to vote for less and less over the course of my life.

    I ideally want this country to have a multi-party system. I've often been disappointed with the Democrats, but knowing that no third party has a chance means that I have to vote Democrat. That being said, I'd also vote for Democrats over a viable Libertarian Party or Constitution Party candidate if one arose.

    The last Republican president I'm generally fond of is Eisenhower. I'm not certain I would have voted for him at the time. The last Republican candidate I probably would have voted for over the Democrat was Charles Evan Hughes in 1916.

    The Republican party just generally hasn't been a party philosophically compatible with myself.
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  10. #20
    Insert witty line here... Ponyboy's Avatar
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    I have switched more than once. I started out Dem went Rep for awhile and now I lean towards Dem but consider myself moderate, socially liberal but fiscally conservative.
    I'm never wrong, I'm just sometimes less right

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