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View Poll Results: Should Snowden be freed?

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    34 80.95%
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  1. #1
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    Default Should Snowden be freed?

    What do you think?

  2. #2
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    He violated national security and broke the law. He violated his confidentiality agreements with the company he worked for. He caused his company to violate their client confidentiality agreement, at of all places, the NSA. He left his hot girlfriend in the lurch. He's not some heroic whistleblower. His actions demonstrate a lack of character and ethics. The dummy deserves everything he is going to get.

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  3. #3
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
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    Whatever you may think of him, guilty or not guilty, the guy is indeed very courageous.
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

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  4. #4
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    He does not deserve prison because of 'a lack of character and ethics' (if that were the criterion, most politicians should be sent up immediately). He may deserve it for breaking the law though, although I don't think he should be put away for life as many do.
    Who died? Who was injured? Was security compromised? Demonstrate how.
    Does anyone believe that this changes anything? The NSA will snoop as usual, even if their tactics are exposed. This is a tempest in a teapot.

  5. #5
    Filthy Apes! Kalach's Avatar
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    Depends how far removed from "the people" you expect and accept "the government" should be. If the distance should be great, which is to say fundamental power to choose more than just bureaucratic direction should lie with government institutions, then presumably no, he can't be let off.

    Just by the bye, institutional snooping--a long held tradition of collecting and examining data in secret--is different from a surveillance operation. The latter needs secrecy to be effective. The former needs permission. Snowden's actions will in fact probably hasten the formal granting of that permission. Previously that permission had been granted informally--and in the most lacklutstre fashion possible--by internet-age ennui. "Oh," you say, "of course they know everything we do..."


    Pffft.
    Bellison uncorked a flood of horrible profanity, which, translated, meant, "This is extremely unusual."

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  6. #6
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Potential scenario - unwelcome in the US, he becomes relatively poor in Russia, loses his way, wonders why he did such a stupid thing. He realizes the gravity of his mistake and what he threw away. He drinks too much vodka for too long and dies at an early age.

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  7. #7
    Filthy Apes! Kalach's Avatar
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    Meanwhile China and Russia are saying "haha, no" to the US whose mighty international might is very compelling in... Ecuador.

    You can have this kind of state if you want. What would be good though is if you could tell everyone the key point of distinction between yourselves and, say, China. Because China absolutely will use your rhetoric. The government of China is presently killing its own citizens in Xinjiang because "terrorist". And in other news, drones. And in the very very near future who is going to be surprised when they have a PRISM? Thanks, US, for licensing that to the world. Would you now please lay the groundwork for how to distinguish between good and bad uses of surveillance?
    Bellison uncorked a flood of horrible profanity, which, translated, meant, "This is extremely unusual."

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  8. #8
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Depends on the perspective. It is in the interest of the US to uphold the law and punish those who break it. Personally, though, I am sympathetic to him because I see what he did as a good thing.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Depends on the perspective. It is in the interest of the US to uphold the law and punish those who break it. Personally, though, I am sympathetic to him because I see what he did as a good thing.
    This. He broke the law and put himself in danger, but he did so to uncover a shitty practice. Sometimes breaking the law is the moral thing to do.


    Imagine Canada secretly listening in on every conversation in the USA (including business secrets and the like) and wiretapping the White House. That is basically what America is currently doing to Europe.
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  10. #10
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Depends on the perspective. It is in the interest of the US to uphold the law and punish those who break it. Personally, though, I am sympathetic to him because I see what he did as a good thing.


    I'm ambivalent about it. I think national security (of any government) has to be preserved for the sake of stability, but not at any cost. While I think the US government are totally within their rights to pursue him, I think it makes them look like assholes - like they got caught with their hand in the cookie jar and now want to get revenge on the person that exposed them. It might have been more in their interest to deny everything and pretend like he's just a nobody making up fanciful stories.
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