User Tag List

First 34567 Last

Results 41 to 50 of 80

  1. #41
    `~~Philosoflying~~` SillySapienne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    9,849

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    And so many other cases. Secularism has proven more susceptible to brutal authoritarian measures than religion.
    LOL!!!

    You must be joking, right?

    Please elaborate, i.e. provide examples of (what is, at least in my opinion), such a ludicrous claim.

    `
    'Cause you can't handle me...

    "A lie is a lie even if everyone believes it. The truth is the truth even if nobody believes it." - David Stevens

    "That that is, is. That that is not, is not. Is that it? It is."

    Veritatem dies aperit

    Ride si sapis

    Intelligentle sparkles

  2. #42
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    My question is, how is it possible to be a sincere 'Christian' when the essence of Christianity as that of any religion is obedience to authority.
    The essence of Christianity is man's free will before God.

    Yet how can one earnestly believe in something that coerces his thoughts into acceptance of a formula which has no regard for his thoughts or the inner being by and large?
    Uhhhh.....one of the major tenets of Catholicism is that reason is a gift from God, so using one's reason to formulate one's relationship with God is not contrary to faith. But as Pascal stated, a major goal of reason is to also acknolwedge its limits.

    By claiming that Catholicism is only about external enforcement, you clearly ignore the great lengths that the inner life has been explored within the Catholic tradition. Pascal was just one famous example of such. Same with Thomas Kempis, who actually wrote a treatise titled the Inner Life. Then what about mystics like St. John of the Cross with Dark Night of the Soul. St. Therese's "little path to Christ". St. Francis of Assisi. Then of course my name-sakes, Charles Peguy, who concentrated much on the importance of the inner life.

    Then what about Leon Bloy, another Catholic writer. Here's the summary given by Frank O'Malley in "The Passion of Leon Bloy":
    ""Like the other scripituralized critics of modern civilization, Bloy was trying really, I suppose, to redeem the human personality from immersion in matter, to restore vitality of the interior light and love that had become a stereotype, to reverse the tendency to search for solutions of existence in terms of the external world rather than in the terms of the inward and spiritual. Bloy knew what Pascal meant when he said that the heart has its reasons that reason does not know. But this knowledge is not simply emotional: it reunites thought and feeling - and these we are always ready to divorce. This knowledge is, rather, intuitive, reaching reality more utterly and fully than knowledge by logic arranged in formula. The knowledge we speak of is that of the creative, whole, dynamized mind, the mind that is really free. And it is this kind of knowledge alone, knowledge inflamed by love, that permits what Berdyaev has termed an "extraordinary freedom of spirit, a prodigy of free faith, a spontaneous recognition of 'things not seen'." In other words, this is the knowledge that permits vision - the vision of God. This warm, desirous, centripetal knowledge Bloy possessed. His thought was indeed kindled in love, in personality- and personality, for Bloy, was the sacred achievement of vision."
    Then what about the immeasurable Catholic influence on the philosophy of Personalism, which concerns the importance of the human personality and inter-relationships with others in regards to the development of an authentic life. Then the Catholic Existentialism of Gabriel Marcel.

    Oh yeah, can't forget St. Augustine, who was perhaps one of the first persons to address the inner life to any great extent with his book Confessions - the first autobiography ever written. From my own thread concerning Augustinian spirituality:
    "3. PRIMACY OF INTERIORITY

    The beginning of our search and journey is from within, in our own subjectivity. We need to know ourselves first. We need to discover our needs, wants and fears. And the interior is also the place of fulfilment and completion. Therefore, the intrinsic is superior to the extrinsic, the mysterious to the “merely problematical”, reality to appearance, the soul to the body. Man in his interiority: this is the place of life and the place to quest God. “You are within me, more deeply than my deepest soul” (Confessions III, 6, 10)"

    http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...tml#post227442
    Seriously, I could go on endlessly about this.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Posts
    6,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    I'll be nice and choose to just ignore this post.
    The Catholic church was created so it could be used as a political tool. That's not an indictment of Christianity, only of the Church.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  4. #44
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    The Catholic church was created so it could be used as a political tool. That's not an indictment of Christianity, only of the Church.
    The Church existed before Constantine you know.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Posts
    6,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    The Church existed before Constantine you know.
    Not in the same form.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  6. #46
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainChick View Post
    LOL!!!

    You must be joking, right?

    Please elaborate, i.e. provide examples of (what is, at least in my opinion), such a ludicrous claim.

    I already gave the example of "Enlightened Despotism" of the 18th century. Then the secularism of the French Revolution, which involved the Reign of Terror. Then the millions killed under the militant atheism of Communist regimes.

    Let's compare numbers: over a 300 year period, the Spainish Inquisition killed around 3000 people. That's the same number of nuns the Communists killed in 1924 alone!

    Bye-bye Kiddo...

    Hello Peguy!!!

    Hello to you too madame.

  7. #47
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    Not in the same form.
    The Church develops over time.

  8. #48
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    Here we live under the rule of law.
    You do know that the concept of the rule of law derives from the Medieval period, which concerned itself with issues of Natural Law that were supreme over human laws.

    Much of the Western legal tradition derives from religious sources, like Catholic Canon law.

    Talk about irony here.

  9. #49
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,546

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Victor, there are many different ways via which to view "pedophile." You don't get to choose which framework is valid, especially by semantically slight of hand. (Frankly, it doesn't matter what your country sees it as, if you're discussing this with people from all over the globe, correct?)

    Peguy was obviously discussing the issue from a moral and psychological viewpoint, as was I. Those are valid ways to approach the topic of "pedophile." you actually seem to be skipping among various frameworks (moral, philosophical, legal, psychological) in whatever way suits your purposes, post to post.

    I do see it as a fallacy that you equate "pedophile" with "rape," even if you prefer to stick with your framework of "legal issue." The legality of something is merely how human society most realistically thinks it can punish something, with the intent of stopping it; it deals not at all with the "essence and definition" of what a particular act actually might be, in truth. Especially if you're going to explore spiritual/moral culpability (considering the Church is involved), the "legal framework" seems quite inadequate to me.
    Many issues have shades of grey but this is an issue that is simply black and white.

  10. #50
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Well that's enough for one night. Im off to sleep.

Similar Threads

  1. Innovation, Entrepreneurs, and Immigration in the U.S.
    By ygolo in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-12-2012, 11:23 AM
  2. Twenty-First Century: Will the Catholic Church finally end?
    By Kephalos in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 03-25-2012, 11:41 PM
  3. how to crush someone's hopes and dreams in the nicest way possible?
    By miss fortune in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 03-18-2011, 04:51 PM
  4. Optimism and Pessimism in the world religions
    By Survive & Stay Free in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-16-2010, 11:39 AM
  5. Politics and Bullying in the Academy
    By Orangey in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 11-04-2008, 11:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO