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  1. #1

    Default Hipsters and similar trends?

    Are you aware of trends like these and do they matter? I only really became aware of the hipsters in hearing them described with dislike in different places and then finally seeing an episode of the simpsons devoted to deriding them, although what interested me is that it appeared to be something that cut across age boundaries, it wasnt a "youth culture", so do you think this is more common? Do you keep up to date with developments like this or dont you care?

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    I always keep up with stuff like this. I've always understood what was going on culturally with music and pop culture since I was a child of about 7 or 8. That's why I know so much about 80s music and fashion and trends, despite the fact that I was a child then.

    I think that being a hipster is something that transcends the age barrier because in many ways it seems influenced by 90s grunge focus on irony and embracing anti-corporate values. That's why I embrace hipster-dom in its milder, more authentic form. I genuinely like a lot of the music (and I'm always looking for new music and movies) and I do authentically prefer to walk or bike than to drive a car, and I've been ironic and anti-corporate since my teens, so it's just natural for me.

    But because of my older age I'm obviously going to be more resistant to the more commercial or mainstreaming social aspects of hipsters, like shopping at American Apparel. However, I had hipster glasses before hipster glasses were even cool.

    Yes. I said it.

    I still think being a hipster is an under 40 thing, and in that sense is still sort of a youth culture. 40 is the new 30. The hippies said don't trust anyone over 30, and now being a hippie is very mainstream for many age groups. I think that our concept of what is old and young is different than it was 50 years ago.

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    As much as I enjoy making cracks about them, the truth is that hipster is very poorly defined. I probably fit someone's idea of a hipster, I mean, I even have a beard.

    Basically, the only workable definition of hipster you can get is "20 - 30 something middle/upper middle class left-leaning (probably) white person who annoys me". It's kinda like calling someone a honky, except it's mostly white people who use it.

    The comments about "hipster culture" being "inauthentic" that you can find around the internet if you search hard enough, however, are sort of bunk. Probably the people making them are either people who take themselves too seriously, or baby boomers complaining about the whippersnappers. It's not as though there weren't plenty of people who identified as hippies that didn't give a damn about politics and just liked having lots of sex and doing lots of drugs. The "we were different, we stood for something, man," is bullshit.

    "Coolness" and "youth subcultures" kind of go hand-in-hand with inauthenticity. Ever since youth subculture has been a thing, inauthenticity has been an important part of it. The "revolutionary" culture of the 60's was obsessed with trying to recapture the radicalism of the 30's. What did you think Bob Dylan's Guthrie obsession was all about? Before that, the Beats were obsessed with jazz and imitating black culture.

    I am interested in seeing what happens to Generation Y once some of us start popping out kids. I do wonder if the values (most of which I support, even if I may disagree with the expression of them) might be a flash in the pan, but I may be wrong with that. I'm not sure if having kids changed the Baby Boomers, or if the "revolutionary' aspects of that generation were over-emphasized. It very well may be the latter.
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    There is a level of cowardice lower than that of the conformist: the fashionable non-conformist. -Ayn Rand

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    Quote Originally Posted by msg_v2 View Post
    As much as I enjoy making cracks about them, the truth is that hipster is very poorly defined. I probably fit someone's idea of a hipster, I mean, I even have a beard.

    Basically, the only workable definition of hipster you can get is "20 - 30 something middle/upper middle class left-leaning white person who annoys me". It's kinda like calling someone a honky, except it's mostly white people who use it.
    I don't know, there's a definition of hipsterism that I really like. A hipster is someone who cultivates unusual tastes and hobbies in order to separate himself from the rabble. A hipster sees an inverse relationship between the popularity of something and its value.

    That's really the heart of it. The beards, the fixie bikes, the irony, and fedoras are just the interpretations of that ethos. None of those things are inherently hipster; they only become so in context.
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    When I see some skinny pale chump with slumping posture, uncombed hair, trendy glasses and loafers with no socks, I want to throw him out the window.

    Sadly living in London, these types are like a plague.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saudade View Post
    There is a level of cowardice lower than that of the conformist: the fashionable non-conformist. -Ayn Rand
    I love it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saudade View Post
    There is a level of cowardice lower than that of the conformist: the fashionable non-conformist. -Ayn Rand
    I've always thought that those who aren't still ashamed to quote Ayn Rand should be quickly interned in the closest psychiatric hospital or deprived of the right to reproduce and pollute our common gene pool.
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    Quote Originally Posted by msg_v2 View Post
    As much as I enjoy making cracks about them, the truth is that hipster is very poorly defined. I probably fit someone's idea of a hipster, I mean, I even have a beard.
    Yeah...the guy I've been seeing off and on most recently also has a beard. I forgot about the beard thing.

    It's so integral to me that I am afraid that I don't even have a full-fledged awareness of what constitutes "hipster" besides dark framed glasses, bikes, certain bands, irony, and "I was doing that before you."

    I think a lot of it IS authentic in California. I remember JTG used to complain about his hipster friends in SF and then would turn around and go to a fucking sweater party.

    It's like if you're a hipster you still complain about hipsters.

    Because, you know, only the "real" ones are good.



    You gotta kinda laugh about it.

    Basically, the only workable definition of hipster you can get is "20 - 30 something middle/upper middle class left-leaning (probably) white person who annoys me". It's kinda like calling someone a honky, except it's mostly white people who use it.
    Oooh burn.



    The comments about "hipster culture" being "inauthentic" that you can find around the internet if you search hard enough, however, are sort of bunk. Probably the people making them are either people who take themselves too seriously, or baby boomers complaining about the whippersnappers. It's not as though there weren't plenty of people who identified as hippies that didn't give a damn about politics and just liked having lots of sex and doing lots of drugs. The "we were different, we stood for something, man," is bullshit.

    "Coolness" and "youth subcultures" kind of go hand-in-hand with inauthenticity. Ever since youth subculture has been a thing, inauthenticity has been an important part of it. The "revolutionary" culture of the 60's was obsessed with trying to recapture the radicalism of the 30's. What did you think Bob Dylan's Guthrie obsession was all about? Before that, the Beats were obsessed with jazz and imitating black culture.

    I am interested in seeing what happens to Generation Y once some of us start popping out kids. I do wonder if the values (most of which I support, even if I may disagree with the expression of them) might be a flash in the pan, but I may be wrong with that. I'm not sure if having kids changed the Baby Boomers, or if the "revolutionary' aspects of that generation were over-emphasized. It very well may be the latter.
    I agree with all of this, I mean a cultural trend is going to be trendy. WTF.

    That's culture for you. I mean culture is a cohesive, group thing after all.

    BTW, there are some people in Gen Y who have kids.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EffEmDoubleyou View Post
    I don't know, there's a definition of hipsterism that I really like. A hipster is someone who cultivates unusual tastes and hobbies in order to separate himself from the rabble. A hipster sees an inverse relationship between the popularity of something and its value.

    That's really the heart of it. The beards, the fixie bikes, the irony, and fedoras are just the interpretations of that ethos. None of those things are inherently hipster; they only become so in context.
    The actual ethical definition of hipster is basically all that I naturally am: left-leaning anti-corporate counter-culture person who is usually college educated, especially liberal arts or fine art, and rejects all that is empty, vapid, and representative of the greedy oligopoly and corporate culture.

    The aesthetic of hipsters, like the bikes, actually is part of the ethics. Gasoline. Air pollution.

    The clothes are mainly inspired by 90s grunge, like I said before, so it's actually quite easy for older hipsters around 30 or in their 30s to adapt without even thinking about it. Like I said, I really did have hipster glasses before they were "cool." I have never TRIED to dress "hipster."

    And apparently I find a lot of features of it aesthetically naturally attractive, like a vaguely metrosexual guy with a funky asymmetrical hair cut, or Kurt Cobain looking guy with short scruffy blonde beard.

    I have never given it conscious thought that I want to be it. However, I do give conscious thought to younger hipsters wanting to "fit in" via shopping at chain stores (although I will admit American Apparel has much better business ethics than a place like Abercrombie) and doing all of the little signifiers, but that shit tends to come along with high school and college age, anyway. I went through my own version of it when I was in my late teens and early 20s.

    So I do reject the actual overweening INTENT to be a hipster, like you were shopping for a uniform or trying to impress people with how "different" you are. But hey again, that's a very common thing for adolescents to do.

    I'm also opposed to the pretentiousness that's supposed be so "deep" and just comes across as "obnoxious." Again, though, I think I have more of an awareness of that because of my age, and would have thought it was deep too without life experience.

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