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  1. #91
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal+ View Post
    The question is not what you think is the only possible psychological issue. What if you're wrong? What if each child is different enough in that some will be affected in different ways?
    The imprinting process in typical family dynamics already affects individuals in different ways, due to differences in brain chemistry, socialization, and (rudimentary) life experiences. And if I'm wrong and there are other psychological issues I can't discern, then I think any child with loving and responsible parents will be able to overcome any theoretical psychological damage that results from subconsciously identifying with/normalizing a 'tribe' that has different physiological features from oneself.

  2. #92
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pseudo View Post
    I was asking you what your point was.

    If you think that certain ethnic groups will be looked down upon it still doesn't seem to support the idea that this girl wont understand her race or culture.

    Racial identity is being linked in this article but that doesn't mean that this is correct. I would argue it's not because 1.) black people do not have a single homogenous culture and 2.) a person raised in the culture of another race will not innately retain the culture of their biological parents.

    I don't think it's about "overcoming the entropy of black culture". Rather, it's about becoming more than the stereotypes of black people. Katie might have to confront other peoples prejudice against her parents, but I don't see that as psychologically damaging and it's a something many people of various backgrounds encounter.
    Where did you get "won't understand her race or culture"? It's simply a question of racial confusion: "Am I Black or White?" Or "Am I part of Black culture or White culture?" The fact that people DO identify race or ethnicity with culture is relevant, not the idea that people change cultures for some reason.

    I agree with what you said about stereotypes, because these stereotypes are part of what makes for Black American culture. Culture is distinguished in part by the food the individuals partake in, be it Kosher food, or watermelon and "purple drank."
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  3. #93
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowtech redneck View Post
    The imprinting process in typical family dynamics already affects individuals in different ways, due to differences in brain chemistry, socialization, and (rudimentary) life experiences. And if I'm wrong and there are other psychological issues I can't discern, then I think any child with loving and responsible parents will be able to overcome any theoretical psychological damage that results from subconsciously identifying with/normalizing a 'tribe' that has different physiological features from oneself.
    Perhaps so in Katie's case, because her family situation is stable. But only because it's stable.

    Do you know the 16 family types in the Circumplex Model?
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  4. #94
    Epiphany
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal+ View Post
    Where did you get "won't understand her race or culture"? It's simply a question of racial confusion: "Am I Black or White?" Or "Am I part of Black culture or White culture?" The fact that people DO identify race or ethnicity with culture is relevant, not the idea that people change cultures for some reason.

    I agree with what you said about stereotypes, because these stereotypes are part of what makes for Black American culture. Culture is distinguished in part by the food the individuals partake in, be it Kosher food, or watermelon and "purple drank."
    Some people identify race with culture. Why do you think she would find it necessary to identify with either so-called "white" or "black" culture? Though I would argue there is no such thing. You seem determined to label people.

    Are you really concerned about the psychological wellbeing of this girl? Because there are a lot of fucked up kids who are raised by their biological parents.

  5. #95
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal+ View Post
    Perhaps so in Katie's case, because her family situation is stable. But only because it's stable.

    Do you know the 16 family types in the Circumplex Model?
    No, I'm unfamiliar with it. Its my understanding, however, that there is at least a rudimentary screening process as far as domestic adoptions are concerned, so adoptive parents (already a self-selecting group) are probably somewhat more stable in general than biological parents.

  6. #96
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Do you think Katie, the baby girl in this article, will suffer emotional or other form of psychological harm from this adoption arrangement?
    There's gonna be some social disapproval, that's for sure.

    How she's gonna deal with that is hard to predict.

    Pressure can smash, but it also makes diamonds.
    -----------------

    A man builds. A parasite asks 'Where is my share?'
    A man creates. A parasite says, 'What will the neighbors think?'
    A man invents. A parasite says, 'Watch out, or you might tread on the toes of God... '


    -----------------

  7. #97
    Senior Member Pseudo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal+ View Post
    Where did you get "won't understand her race or culture"? It's simply a question of racial confusion: "Am I Black or White?" Or "Am I part of Black culture or White culture?" The fact that people DO identify race or ethnicity with culture is relevant, not the idea that people change cultures for some reason.

    I agree with what you said about stereotypes, because these stereotypes are part of what makes for Black American culture. Culture is distinguished in part by the food the individuals partake in, be it Kosher food, or watermelon and "purple drank."



    I've already explained that there isn't a homogenous white culture or black culture so what really would she be questioning?. Her culture will probably differ from other white and black people's. again you're conflating race an culture to a point thy makes no sense. there is not some epic difference between American black and white culture.

    I don't know if your just trying to get a rise out of me but Black Americans don't all regularly eat watermelon or purple drank. It's not a sacred or traditional food for black people. Those stereotypes are meant to degrade black people and are not indicative of their culture. Basically it akin to arguing that hair grease and the mafia are part of what make Italian culture.

  8. #98
    ✿ڿڰۣஇღ♥ wut ♥ღஇڿڰۣ✿ digesthisickness's Avatar
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    Excerpt: "Phyllis was in many ways an unlikely savior. The former president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Association of Black Social Workers, she joined her colleagues in condemning the adoption of black children by white families as "cultural genocide"—a position she still holds in theory, if not in practice. She couldn't say no to the "charming, energetic" girl who ended up on her front doorstep."

    She's a hypocrite. And, they make great, level-headed parents. I don't see the problem.
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  9. #99
    Epiphany
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    Quote Originally Posted by digesthisickness View Post
    Excerpt: "Phyllis was in many ways an unlikely savior. The former president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Association of Black Social Workers, she joined her colleagues in condemning the adoption of black children by white families as "cultural genocide"—a position she still holds in theory, if not in practice. She couldn't say no to the "charming, energetic" girl who ended up on her front doorstep."

    She's a hypocrite. And, they make great, level-headed parents. I don't see the problem.
    Yes, she's a hypocrite. But she's more like the grandmother who has primary custody during the week. Her daughter and son-in-law are being regarded as the parents and may or may not hold the double-standard that Phyllis does. Perhaps, they are more level-headed.

  10. #100
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
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    Well it's good she has a family. It'll be sorta odd, and maybe some people will give her crap for it, but I think people are pretty accepting of this sort of thing once you get to know people. Not always though.

    I met a girl, blonde, blue eyed, who was raised in an Asian family. She identified strongly with Korean culture. Superficially people aren't going to see her as Korean any time soon, but I certainly wasn't going to deny her her identity. Obviously, she was influenced by that cultural upbringing.

    I've known other people who were adopted or mixed race. Girl I know was Sri-Lankan ethno-biologically but raised in a reform jewish household. I didn't know her well enough but she certainly identified with being jewish, though I wonder if she bonded with the other south asians at school? I don't know.

    Mixed race individuals IME tend to identify with both (or 3 or more!) races in some ways but perhaps more often than not they tend to reject the concept of really making race their identity, it's more just an aspect of who they are.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

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