User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 103

  1. #31
    null Jonny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    MBTI
    FREE
    Posts
    2,486

    Default

    I wanna be on that jury! The thought of those 350+ "exhibits" alone makes my heart flutter.

    In all seriousness, the most disturbing part here is the extortion. If it were just a guy hacking into people's accounts and stealing nudes, or pretending to be a friend so he could convince some silly girl to show her titties, then I wouldn't think much of it.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  2. #32
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    XXFP
    Posts
    2,706

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    They were asking for it. I have no problem admitting it. I don't defend sexual exploitation (which is more of an issue of leveraging power and wielding some authoriative role beforehand), but I'm all for exploiting stupidity. When people willingly hand over their power. People should be more responsible for what they reveal about themselves and what position they put themselves in. Putting this guy in prison isn't doing them any good.
    In my opinion, while shady, the act of tricking someone else to do something consensual generally isn't a crime. However, once he HAD tricked people, he blackmailed them into sending more pictures.

    You could argue the relative merits of sending pictures over the internet to people you don't know well, however, what he did was clearly the wrong thing to do. Putting him in prison serves a legitimate function of punishment for real harm and prevention of him continuing to do it, at least while he is in jail.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

  3. #33
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,536
    Quote Originally Posted by Il Morto Che Parla View Post
    Now in 2013, the digital economy and social networking, appears to be the new currency.
    Yes, it's called the Attention Economy and whosoever gains the most attention wins. And the winners are celebrities. We pay them attention.

    This is like the Money Economy of the 19th century that was dominated by the robber barons. And so the celebrities of the 21st century are the robber barons of the Attention Economy.

    But just as the robber barons were tamed by the unions, so the celebrities will be tamed when we start paying attention to each other.

  4. #34
    Cheeseburgers freeeekyyy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Socionics
    ILI Te
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    From The Associated Press


    This story is full of

    105 YEARS!!
    Seriously??
    These are women, not children. He's not a pedophile, just your average netperv.
    Being asked for naked pictures / to strip online is one of the charming features of the Internet familiar to every woman who doesn't live under a rock (and even some of us that do). Don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to trivialise something that I would categorise as anti-social and exploitative behaviour, I've even supported the banning of such individuals from forums like this one. But is it criminal behaviour worthy of a life sentence? I dunno so much. Granted, his methods were more intrusive than most (probably because most pervs lack the skills) but 105 yrs? Serial rapists don't get sentences like that. In what universe is that proportionate?


    Other confusing features of this story:
    -There are apparently large numbers of women who post naked pictures of themselves on Facebook who DON'T want their Facebook friends to see those pictures. (???) Are there really people out there who still trust Facebook "security"?

    -There are apparently large numbers of women who don't find it weird when their (presumably straight) female friends ask them to webcam strip for them.
    Is this some new ritual of female friendship that I haven't heard about?

    -There are apparently large numbers of women who, having had their Facebook account hijacked, instead of reporting this activity and getting their account blocked, allow themselves to be "blackmailed" into stripping (so that the naked pictures they posted on Facebook won't be posted....on Facebook....)

    I must be missing something here... Please enlighten me.
    I'd heard valley girls weren't the sharpest tools in the box but this just beggars belief. And why does the FBI have such a hard-on for hackers?
    It's not 105 years because of the type of crime, but the fact that it was repeated multiple times. Should a sentence reach a cut-off after a certain point or something? And the fact that they're not children doesn't mean they weren't violated. He used dishonesty to coerce these women into doing things they otherwise wouldn't have. I don't think it can fairly be called rape, but I don't think a person can say they gave "informed" consent. Each crime is probably only worth a few years, but it adds up.
    You lose.

    _______

    RCOEI
    Melancholic-Choleric
    Respectful Leader

    Johari Window|Nohari Window

  5. #35
    Cheeseburgers freeeekyyy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Socionics
    ILI Te
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I generally judge people who think this kind of thing is grand, I tend to find too that if this sort of thing was the work of government it'd have the libertarians and knee jerk reactionists coming out of the wood work in droves, although when its a private individual the response if exactly the opposite. Inconsistency much.
    I don't know about anybody else, but I think he did something pretty disgusting. It would be one thing if they had given informed consent, but they really didn't. The fact is, he lied about who he was to obtain the material. I don't think a person can reasonably defend his actions.
    You lose.

    _______

    RCOEI
    Melancholic-Choleric
    Respectful Leader

    Johari Window|Nohari Window

  6. #36
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    Yes, it's called the Attention Economy and whosoever gains the most attention wins. And the winners are celebrities. We pay them attention.

    This is like the Money Economy of the 19th century that was dominated by the robber barons. And so the celebrities of the 21st century are the robber barons of the Attention Economy.

    But just as the robber barons were tamed by the unions, so the celebrities will be tamed when we start paying attention to each other.
    For once, I agree. And even understand you.

  7. #37
    Tier 1 Member LunaLuminosity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6 so/sp
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    2,484

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    They were asking for it. I have no problem admitting it. I don't defend sexual exploitation (which is more of an issue of leveraging power and wielding some authoriative role beforehand), but I'm all for exploiting stupidity. When people willingly hand over their power. People should be more responsible for what they reveal about themselves and what position they put themselves in. Putting this guy in prison isn't doing them any good.
    It's still very much victim blaming. "Stupidity" isn't the crime, the exploitation by random internet pervs is. The crime gets punished........ the alleged stupidity gets Internet Safety 101 classes.

  8. #38
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LunaLuminosity View Post
    It's still very much victim blaming. "Stupidity" isn't the crime, the exploitation by random internet pervs is. The crime gets punished........ the alleged stupidity gets Internet Safety 101 classes.
    Stupidity isn't a crime, but the law shouldn't take an active interest in protecting stupid people from themselves. It doesn't seem that far off from those spam emails that try to dupe you with someone from your address book. Only old ladies who just got the internet fall for that. Or kids who jump into a "mysterious grey van" because the driver said they were friends of the family. "Stay away from grey vans." That's the oldest lesson in the book.

    Does it excuse him? No. But the outrage and the sentence discussed is ridiculous. It's turning these women into complete victims. When they're partial victims. I'm not quite sure how Skype works, but it seems like there must've been some red lights if he was "posing" as one of their friends. How did they not question what was going on? Isn't Skype a one to one video chat? Was he using a recorded video feed from one of their friends? And how would he set up the right dialogue for them to be responsive to that? Or if he was typing through text, while they were on the webcam, then that should be a redlight in itself. Why would they give in so willingly and strip, when the other side of the chat is just text? There's no rapport established there. I'm sure some of them might've asked for him to get on cam too, but I wonder what his excuses were and why they didn't just cut it off. There are multiple levels of bad choices and stupid here. He shouldn't take the full of responsibility of what happened.

    In any case, I doubt he'll really get sentenced for that long.

  9. #39
    meh Salomé's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    10,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    I'm not quite sure how Skype works, but it seems like there must've been some red lights if he was "posing" as one of their friends. How did they not question what was going on? Isn't Skype a one to one video chat? Was he using a recorded video feed from one of their friends? And how would he set up the right dialogue for them to be responsive to that? Or if he was typing through text, while they were on the webcam, then that should be a redlight in itself. Why would they give in so willingly and strip, when the other side of the chat is just text?
    This is what I was thinking. I just can't figure how it was possible. Or why they would do it. And yes, he was posing as female friends. I took the AP feed because it mentioned the ludicrous sentencing, but the press release explicitly states that he posed as women (friends). I actually though this story was a wind up, until I saw it on the DoJ site. Of course, Anonymous could have hacked the site (which would be more believable than this story).

    There are plenty more examples on Naked Security (appropriately).

    In July last year, Trevor Harwell, 21, was given a year-long jail sentence for setting up a ruse in which he convinced women that they needed to "steam" their webcams in order to fix a fault.

    The easiest way to do this, Mr Harwell's "error" message explained, was by setting up the webcam near a shower.
    Sweet Lord.

    Stupidity isn't a crime,
    No. But it really ought to be.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  10. #40
    meh Salomé's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    10,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceBaby View Post
    A digression to mention it, but I don't doubt that they do either. I worked in an IT company where digital media sent to us of of nice looking girls in nice looking houses were routinely "discussed" by the "guys" and saved to local drives.
    IT attracts a lot of creeps. I think people naively assume their data will be taken care of by professionals and their privacy respected. They could not be more wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by lowtech redneck View Post
    um, this guy committed multiple (hundreds!) counts of identity theft, blackmail, voyeurism, and sexual assault (admittedly indirectly on that last one, but still, hundreds of times!).....I realize there are somewhat different standards on the internet (stealing copyrighted material in particular, which of course I've done and have my own hypocritical double standards about), but I don't get why people view a 105-year sentence as an outrage.....what if the man had broken into all of these women's homes, installed hidden cameras in the bedrooms/bathrooms, and proceeded to blackmail them afterwards?
    Oh please. That's not sexual "assault" by any stretch of the imagination. It's not even genuine identity theft. It's impersonation.
    The sentence is absurd and you know it.

    Cyberbullying can be far worse than this kind of thing, and when is that ever prosecuted? Even when people have been driven to suicide, no action is taken.

    Quote Originally Posted by Il Morto Che Parla View Post
    IDK it depends where you draw, the line. Showing some tits isn't pornographic IMO. It's up to Facebook and the individuals involved rly, anyone can else can choose who to friend/defriend.
    I'm assuming these were not innocent pics, or else how could they have been used for blackmail? Moral of the story: don't post anything you wouldn't want your partner/friends/parents/colleagues/authorities/Joe Bloggs to see. You give unscrupulous people way too much power otherwise. And you only have yourself to blame. Facebook et al offer no promises to protect your privacy. Far from it.

    What I don't understand is why people implicitly seem to believe they have a "right" to privacy online, yet no one seems to care that few such protections are enshrined in law.
    When you sign up with a service provider like Facebook, you explicitly sign away rights to your own data.

    Quote Originally Posted by Facebook
    For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (IP content), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    The other thing, why the hell would hating on predators, particularly male predators, mean you belong in a patriarchal society which tolerates abuse of women like Iran?
    wut?

    Quote Originally Posted by LunaLuminosity View Post
    The whole "well they were stupid for posting their pictures online even if privately" argument is eerily close to the "they were asking for it" defense. Stupidity or not, this is grand scale hacking, blackmail, and some form of sexual harassment/exploitation and should be prosecuted as such.
    Sexual harassment is rarely, if ever, prosecuted. Is it even a crime in the US if no actual assault took place? If it is, why wasn't he prosecuted on those terms?

    In the UK, this might be prosecuted under the "voyeurism" section of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, which carries a maximum sentence of 2 yrs, but that's for an aggravated offence which includes making the material available for commercial gain.

    People keep missing the obvious. None of the counts were about the sexual nature of the crime, all were related to "hacking". This isn't about protecting women or stupid people. It's about clamping down with extreme prejudice on people who are seen as a threat to government. Why else would the FBI get involved?

    Where someone in the UK might get conditional bail and be prevented from going online, the same crime in the US merits "decades" in prison. That's crazy. There's something very wrong with your criminal justice system.
    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    They were asking for it. I have no problem admitting it. I don't defend sexual exploitation (which is more of an issue of leveraging power and wielding some authoriative role beforehand), but I'm all for exploiting stupidity. When people willingly hand over their power. People should be more responsible for what they reveal about themselves and what position they put themselves in. Putting this guy in prison isn't doing them any good.
    Agree that a custodial sentence isn't helpful and other measures might be more appropriate.
    Disagree that they were "asking for it". This was fraud. No one asks for that, even if it might reasonably be expected. I guess some people have to learn these things the hard way.

    Quote Originally Posted by freeeekyyy View Post
    It's not 105 years because of the type of crime, but the fact that it was repeated multiple times. Should a sentence reach a cut-off after a certain point or something?
    Yes. Of course it should. As it does in most of the civilised world.
    Quote Originally Posted by freeeekyyy View Post
    It would be one thing if they had given informed consent, but they really didn't. The fact is, he lied about who he was to obtain the material.
    Um..yeah. If they'd given consent it wouldn't have been a crime.
    It's safest to assume that everyone on the Internet is lying to obtain something from you. Including Facebook. This ought to be taught in schools.

    How many times do men pretend to be women online in order to sexually humiliate other dudes? Do they get prosecuted?

    Can you begin to imagine the immensity of the task of prosecuting everyone who misrepresents themselves in order to get what they want? I mean. You'd run out of lawyers in no time - they'd all be in jail.
    Let's not pretend that's what this is about.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

Similar Threads

  1. Did Amy Schumer Get a Pass for Stealing Jokes because She’s a Woman?
    By Beorn in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-08-2016, 05:32 PM
  2. Teen Boy Will Be Charged As Adult For Having Naked Pics of a Minor: Himself
    By Olm the Water King in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 09-04-2015, 08:07 AM
  3. Man faces prison for allegedly stealing $1 soda from McDonald's
    By UniqueMixture in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 08-10-2012, 07:39 AM
  4. Thread for Sharing Holiday/Celebration Pics
    By digesthisickness in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-21-2008, 12:04 PM
  5. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-11-2008, 09:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO