User Tag List

First 22303132333442 Last

Results 311 to 320 of 798

  1. #311
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    MBTI
    DNA
    Socionics
    so
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 93JC View Post
    :marionette:
    LIFE is the expression of SELF within and as Oneness and Equality

  2. #312
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    MBTI
    DNA
    Socionics
    so
    Posts
    42

    Default

    *assumes that there is more than One Party.*
    *moves to reading the next unread message*
    LIFE is the expression of SELF within and as Oneness and Equality

  3. #313
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    MBTI
    Yin
    Enneagram
    One sx/sp
    Posts
    13,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    Why do you think man? Really, have you even spent one calorie of your brain's processing power to answer this? Because the answer is simple. The voting public. I would think most INTPs would have enough contempt and cynicism towards human behavior to mitigate the affects of the typical displacement of blame to not keep themselves out of the category of the multitude of the ignorant, but I guess not. It is the culture of this country. But you will never see it, no matter how many times people tell you and others like you. Your collective fate is sealed.

    If people had a true level of self awareness, their espoused beliefs and actions would align, and the majority of people in the country would be voting for Ron Paul, who has the exact qualities most people SAAAAY they wish for, obviously without the lies and mask of a politician, but instead they choose politicians with the biggest and brightest mask that everyone knows will never amount to reality, but speaks to their inane and base desires. But the collective unconscious of the people has other ideas not grounded in the constructive sense of this world as we know it. As such, this country will fail. It will die without ever knowing what brought about its demise. All the self awareness of a fruit fly. Rome falls, America falls. Same idiocracy.
    You need to confront your cocaine habit.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


    _________________________________
    INTP. Type 1>6>5. sx/sp.
    Live and let live will just amount to might makes right

  4. #314
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    3,187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    You need to confront your cocaine habit.
    Maybe a hit of cocaine would take me to the center of your illusory world so I could finally understand you and the pink elephants that fly out of your butt.

  5. #315

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    Something for all of us to consider.

    Romney stumbles into truth about 'free stuff'
    This article lays out 99% of my problem with current Republican policy. Their extraordinarily narrow definition of "free stuff".
    Everybody have fun tonight. Everybody Wang Chung tonight.

    Johari
    /Nohari

  6. #316
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    Whichever candidate won, there's bad news for us. The campaigns get more negative and less substantial. The voters say they want someone who actually talks about the issues, but in truth they never reward people who do.

    The question is, why has this effect become stronger over time?
    It is why I ponder if the "fiscal cliff" would actually be a good thing to bring the American people into the reality of the situation.

    I think that is the problem, the issues. Speaking about an issue would just pigeonhole you into a corner. It is like the blunder Norquist did when he said Congress can offset cuts with tax increase in carbon (or somewhere along those lines) and oil companies immediately jumped at him to make him change his decision.

    You can call it one of those third rail of politics. One group will say to give us the facts, the other side would also say to give them the facts. What these two groups do not mention is that they do not want facts that prove inconsistent with their "facts."

    Note: Yes, I finally noticed you posted the link I posted a long time after you did. >.<

  7. #317
    Senior Member BAJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    631

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    You need to confront your cocaine habit.
    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    Maybe a hit of cocaine would take me to the center of your illusory world so I could finally understand you and the pink elephants that fly out of your butt.

  8. #318
    Tempbanned
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    14,031

    Default

    It's not just the Republicans that should be worried about their future...

    From Politico:

    Democrats have own fiscal cliff issues

    Democrats are confident that an Election Day mandate will deliver a fiscal cliff deal that raises tax rates on the rich.

    Perhaps a little too confident.

    Republicans may be reeling from their Nov. 6 drubbing, but Democrats have their own internal issues heading into the high-stakes talks — and they’re not insignificant.

    By most accounts, President Barack Obama’s win and the party’s strong showing in Senate races gave the Democrats a leg up in the negotiations to avoid across-the-board tax hikes and draconian spending cuts set to kick in Jan. 1.

    Yet getting a deal that raises tax rates for the wealthy may not be so easy for the party, and not just because of inevitable GOP resistance.

    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) will have to find 60 votes to extend just the middle-income tax rates — far from a given when a swath of the Senate’s moderate Democrats are up for reelection in 2014.

    Reid and the White House will also need to navigate a hardening Democratic divide on entitlements. Progressives don’t want any deep cuts that Republicans will insist on for a deal. But a Third Way poll of 800 Obama voters set for release Tuesday found that efforts to fix Medicare and Social Security enjoy broader support than liberals suggest.

    Even if Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) were to risk his job by backing a tax-rate increase, there are Democrats who think a $250,000 income threshold is too low. So finding 218 House members to pass a bill that would extend the lower tax brackets isn’t exactly a cakewalk. Want Boehner to raise taxes? Republicans privately say the entitlement changes would have to be unimaginably sweeping.

    In a nutshell, Democrats haven’t yet coalesced around a position themselves, let alone found agreement with Republicans.

    So while the election might have given Obama the political leverage to insist in allowing individual tax rates for high-income earners to snap back to nearly 40 percent, getting there is another matter.

    “If you look at history, mandates are what you make of them,” said Rep. Gerry Connolly, a Virginia Democrat who represents the wealthy suburbs of Washington and backs raising taxes on families making more than $1 million annually. “Some people win election by very narrow margins and make enormous mandates out of them, and some people win by enormous margins and squander whatever mandate they’ve got.”

    Top Senate Democrats are confident Reid can balance the conflicting demands of liberals and moderates. He has the confidence of his Democratic Caucus, and they don’t believe — although many Republicans do — that Obama will blink on raising tax rates for the wealthiest Americans.

    “Every time a deal has sputtered or failed to come together at this point, it’s been because of the Republicans’ unwillingness to deal with revenues, not Democrats’ queasiness over making serious choices on spending cuts,” said a top Senate Democratic aide. “Certainly there are members of our caucus who are laying down markers now to try to get the best deal possible. But at the end of the day, the votes will be there for a balanced package.”

    The poll from Third Way, a centrist group, attempts to speak to center-left lawmakers who may be sympathetic to the rising calls from liberals to not compromise. Unions and other progressive groups have pointed to surveys showing that Democrats don’t want lawmakers to touch entitlements, don’t view the debt and deficit as a top priority, and don’t favor Obama working with Republicans.

    Actually, they want all three, concluded the survey by Peter Brodnitz of the Benenson Strategy Group, which does Obama’s polling. It was conducted Nov. 7-9 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percent.

    “There is a debate raging in this town among groups on the left about what this election means and what Obama should do on the fiscal cliff and the deficit,” said Jim Kessler, senior vice president for policy at Third Way, which provided the findings to POLITICO ahead of its Tuesday release. “A lot of the D.C.-based liberal groups seem to be representing a position that doesn’t exist in the Obama coalition.”

    When asked if Democrats and Republicans needed to make “real compromises” to reach a deficit-reduction deal, 80 percent said that statement described their views extremely well, “making this the most strongly supported statement in the entire poll,” according to a Third Way memo on the survey.

    Fifty-three percent of Obama voters ranked increasing taxes on the wealthy as “very important,” but fixing Social Security and Medicare was not far behind with 48 percent. Almost 80 percent said it would be better for the country if Congress and the president made changes to the programs, while 17 percent opted for no changes.

    And 69 percent of the voters viewed the federal deficit as a major problem.

    “The president, during the campaign, really sold the idea of a balanced deal that puts everything on the table,” Kessler said. “The people who voted for him are sold on it.”

    And yet, moderate Democrats are still skittish.

    Sen. Mark Pryor (D-Ark.) is a case in point. When the Senate voted for dueling GOP-Democratic proposals on extending the Bush tax cuts — keeping them in place for all tax rates and then just those for families making less than $250,000 annually — Pryor voted for both. So far, Pryor wants to see what deal is out there before he decides whether to back it.

    “My view is that everything should be on the table,” Pryor told Arkansas reporters last week. “Where I am right now, I don’t want to rule anything out.”

    Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) told POLITICO that she wants to make sure that tax rates for those families making under $250,000 don’t rise. Yet she also supports efforts to keep estate tax rates — set to soar on Jan. 1 if no deal is reached — from increasing as well. That’s an important issue for small-business owners nationwide.

    “With the economy still recovering, this is not the time to raise taxes on middle-class families or our small businesses,” Landrieu said. “The Senate should focus first on areas in which we all agree — specifically, extending the tax rates for those who earn less than $250,000 a year. Then, if we can afford to do more, given the fiscal pressures on our budget, we will make every effort while continuing to move our country down a more sustainable fiscal path.”

    Sen. Mark Begich supported Reid’s floor proposal this summer to extend the Bush tax cuts for those families under the $250,000 limit. The Alaska Democrat won’t say what he’ll do now.

    Pryor, Landrieu and Begich are all up for reelection in 2014.

    This week, as Washington emptied out for the Thanksgiving recess, top aides across the Capitol are engaged in staff-level discussions on how to forge ahead on a fiscal cliff deal. On Monday, House Republican aides — including staff from Rep. Paul Ryan’s Budget Committee staff — huddled with White House staffers, aides said. Ryan’s staff and other committee aides are involved in the discussions.

    All of this uncertainty of the ability to craft a deal — and get it through Congress — has some Democrats pondering the unthinkable: Maybe it’s better to plunge over the fiscal cliff. Rep. Peter Welch, an outspoken Vermont Democrat, said it will be a “challenge” for Obama and Boehner to “come up with a grand bargain where people generally do agree that it’s good for the middle class and good for the economy.”

    “The most important thing is we end up with a balanced deal,” Welch said, describing the thinking of those who are prepared to allow all tax rates to jump. “If we end up with a balanced deal on July 15, that’s much better in the long term for the middle class and the economy than if we end up with a bad deal on Dec. 15.”

  9. #319
    Tempbanned
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    14,031

    Default

    It's always good to see authors I read getting credit, especially in a publication like the New York Times.

    From the New York Times:

    The Conservative Future

    If you listened to the Republican candidates this year, you heard a conventional set of arguments. But if you go online, you can find a vibrant and increasingly influential center-right conversation. Most of the young writers and bloggers in this conversation intermingle, but they can be grouped, for clarity’s sake, around a few hot spots:

    Paleoconservatives. The American Conservative has become one of the more dynamic spots on the political Web. Writers like Rod Dreher and Daniel Larison tend to be suspicious of bigness: big corporations, big government, a big military, concentrated power and concentrated wealth. Writers at that Web site, and at the temperamentally aligned Front Porch Republic, treasure tight communities and local bonds. They’re alert to the ways capitalism can erode community. Dispositionally, they are more Walker Percy than Pat Robertson.

    Larison focuses on what he calls the imperial tendencies of both the Bush and Obama foreign policies. He crusades against what he sees as the unchecked killing power of drone strikes and champions a more modest and noninterventionist foreign policy.

    Lower-Middle Reformists. Reihan Salam, a writer for National Review, E21 and others, recently pointed out that there are two stories about where the Republican Party should go next. There is the upper-middle reform story: Republicans should soften their tone on the social issues to win over suburban voters along the coasts. Then there is a lower-middle reform story: Republicans should focus on the specific economic concerns of the multiethnic working class.

    Salam promotes the latter. This means acknowledging that working-class concerns are not what they were in the 1980s. The income tax is less burdensome than the payroll tax. Family disruption undermines social mobility. Republicans, he argues, should keep the social conservatism, which reinforces families, and supplement it with an agenda that supports upward mobility and social capital.

    Similarly, Henry Olsen of the American Enterprise Institute has argued for a Republican Party that listens more closely to working-class concerns. Ramesh Ponnuru of National Review has argued for family-friendly tax credits and other measures that reinforce middle-class dignity. Jim Manzi wrote a seminal article in National Affairs on the need to promote innovation while reducing inequality.

    Soft Libertarians. Some of the most influential bloggers on the right, like Tyler Cowen, Alex Tabarrok and Megan McArdle, start from broadly libertarian premises but do not apply them in a doctrinaire way.

    Many of these market-oriented writers emphasize that being pro-market is not the same as being pro-business. Luigi Zingales of the University of Chicago published an influential book, “A Capitalism for the People,” that took aim at crony capitalism. Tim Carney of The Washington Examiner does muckraking reporting on corporate-federal collusion. Rising star Derek Khanna wrote a heralded paper on intellectual property rights for the House Republican Study Committee that was withdrawn by higher-ups in the party, presumably because it differed from the usual lobbyist-driven position.

    There are a number of unpredictable libertarian-leaning writers, including Conor Friedersdorf of The Atlantic on civil liberties issues, and Eugene Volokh on legal and free speech concerns.

    Burkean Revivalists. This group includes young conservatives whose intellectual roots go back to the organic vision of society described best by Edmund Burke but who are still deeply enmeshed in current policy debates.

    Yuval Levin, the editor of National Affairs is one of the two or three most influential young writers in politics today. He argues that we are now witnessing the fiscal crisis of the entitlement state, exemplified most of all by exploding health care costs. His magazine promotes a big agenda of institutional modernization.

    The lawyer Adam J. White has argued for an approach to jurisprudence and regulatory affairs based on modesty, but not a doctrinaire clinging to original intent. Ryan Streeter of Indiana champions civil-society conservatism, an updated version of the Jack Kemp style.

    By and large, these diverse writers did not grow up in the age of Reagan and are not trying to recapture it. They disdain what you might call Donor Base Republicanism. Most important, they matured intellectually within a far-reaching Web-based conversation. In contrast to many members of the conservative political-entertainment complex, they are data-driven, empirical and low-key in tone.

    They are united more by a style of feedback and mutual scrutiny than by a common agenda. Some politically unorthodox people in this conversation, such as Josh Barro of Bloomberg View, Meghan Clyne of National Affairs and Heather MacDonald of the Manhattan Institute, specialize in puncturing sentimentality and groupthink.

    Since Nov. 6, the G.O.P. has experienced an epidemic of open-mindedness. The party may evolve quickly. If so, it’ll be powerfully influenced by people with names like Reihan, Ramesh, Yuval and Derek Khanna.

  10. #320
    respect the brick C.J.Woolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    424

    Default

    DB, who are your favorite political writers?

Similar Threads

  1. Former Republican staffer's extremely scathing critique of the Republican party.
    By Magic Poriferan in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-23-2011, 07:29 PM
  2. The Future of Microprocessors
    By ygolo in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-15-2011, 04:23 AM
  3. Unity within the upper echelons of the Republican Party begins to crack.
    By DiscoBiscuit in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 10-26-2009, 12:18 PM
  4. The Death of the Republican Party, Stardate Unknown
    By Wind Up Rex in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 08-08-2009, 01:58 PM
  5. Your Predictions About the Future of Psychotherapy
    By ThatsWhatHeSaid in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 08-06-2008, 07:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO