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  1. #11
    Senior Member EvidenceOfRedemption's Avatar
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    There's no way the federal government could enforce this on the streets. Maybe in the books, but with local and state PD ignoring recreational use, the typical user has little to fear in terms of legal recourse.

    I expect there will be a large "spike" in use at first, which will decline to a high to moderate level that will last a couple years, followed by a drop below the current levels.

    It's hard to explain why, but once weed becomes as common as alcohol, the bubbles of people within which smoking daily and such is an acceptable lifestyle and even an identity, will dissolve and smoking daily will be more akin to alcoholism. Considering most people who want to smoke weed now, do, regardless of it illegality, once the churn of new users is done experimenting the "f*%#-the-police" appeal will be lost, the "I was too scared to try it before because I could get arrested, but now Im not" group will not be enough to outweigh it, and the "its okay to smoke weed every day cause everyone who knows I do does too or can't talk about it" ideology dissolves, I expect the numbers should drop below the current [actual] average, if not that then very close to the current average (which would still be "below" since they'll the current average will be under-represented in comparison).

  2. #12
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvidenceOfRedemption View Post
    There's no way the federal government could enforce this on the streets. Maybe in the books, but with local and state PD ignoring recreational use, the typical user has little to fear in terms of legal recourse.

    I expect there will be a large "spike" in use at first, which will decline to a high to moderate level that will last a couple years, followed by a drop below the current levels.

    It's hard to explain why, but once weed becomes as common as alcohol, the bubbles of people within which smoking daily and such is an acceptable lifestyle and even an identity, will dissolve and smoking daily will be more akin to alcoholism. Considering most people who want to smoke weed now, do, regardless of it illegality, once the churn of new users is done experimenting the "f*%#-the-police" appeal will be lost, the "I was too scared to try it before because I could get arrested, but now Im not" group will not be enough to outweigh it, and the "its okay to smoke weed every day cause everyone who knows I do does too or can't talk about it" ideology dissolves, I expect the numbers should drop below the current [actual] average, if not that then very close to the current average (which would still be "below" since they'll the current average will be underestimated in comparison).
    That would fall in-line with what has happened in Portugal, with their decriminalization.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  3. #13
    can't handcuff the wind Z Buck McFate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvidenceOfRedemption View Post
    It's hard to explain why, but once weed becomes as common as alcohol, the bubbles of people within which smoking daily and such is an acceptable lifestyle and even an identity, will dissolve and smoking daily will be more akin to alcoholism. Considering most people who want to smoke weed now, do, regardless of it illegality, once the churn of new users is done experimenting the "f*%#-the-police" appeal will be lost, the "I was too scared to try it before because I could get arrested, but now Im not" group will not be enough to outweigh it, and the "its okay to smoke weed every day cause everyone who knows I do does too or can't talk about it" ideology dissolves, I expect the numbers should drop below the current [actual] average, if not that then very close to the current average (which would still be "below" since they'll the current average will be under-represented in comparison).
    This would be my guess as well. I'm not a big fan of the stuff myself, but I do think legalization is a step in the right direction for these^ reasons (and since it's being used anyway, it may as be taxed- on top of what a waste it is to have people in jail because of it).

    Does anyone here understand exactly what this changes (to make it legal on state level, even though it's still illegal under federal law)? I gather that for the average user it means they no longer have to worry about getting caught- since the only law enforcement that might catch them is state law enforcement (doesn't an individual have to be caught with copious amounts for it to show up on fed radar?). But is it illegal under federal law to sell any amount, no matter how small? Or is there some other reason it's been mentioned here that businesses will be reluctant? I'm just curious. I tried googling, but haven't found anything useful to point out exactly what making it legal on a state level changes.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z Buck McFate View Post
    This would be my guess as well. I'm not a big fan of the stuff myself, but I do think legalization is a step in the right direction for these^ reasons (and since it's being used anyway, it may as be taxed- on top of what a waste it is to have people in jail because of it).

    Does anyone here understand exactly what this changes (to make it legal on state level, even though it's still illegal under federal law)? I gather that for the average user it means they no longer have to worry about getting caught- since the only law enforcement that might catch them is state law enforcement (doesn't an individual have to be caught with copious amounts for it to show up on fed radar?). But is it illegal under federal law to sell any amount, no matter how small? Or is there some other reason it's been mentioned here that businesses will be reluctant? I'm just curious. I tried googling, but haven't found anything useful to point out exactly what making it legal on a state level changes.
    If the feds interfere in Washington or Colorado, my guess is it would be to arrest suppliers, not consumers. I think we'll eventually have a case that reaches the Supreme Court, with them again deciding the law of the land...at least until Congress is forced to by popular demand.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  5. #15
    Senior Member EvidenceOfRedemption's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z Buck McFate View Post
    Does anyone here understand exactly what this changes (to make it legal on state level, even though it's still illegal under federal law)? I gather that for the average user it means they no longer have to worry about getting caught- since the only law enforcement that might catch them is state law enforcement (doesn't an individual have to be caught with copious amounts for it to show up on fed radar?). But is it illegal under federal law to sell any amount, no matter how small? Or is there some other reason it's been mentioned here that businesses will be reluctant? I'm just curious. I tried googling, but haven't found anything useful to point out exactly what making it legal on a state level changes.
    Actually state (e.g. highway patrol) as well as local law enforcement could not arrest anyone unless they had over 1 ounce--which is a lot since the stuff is roughly the consistency of pressed and dried flowers. A comfortably full freezer zip-lock bag is about how much an ounce of marijuana is... more than anyone could even carry on themselves without a backpack.


    (that's a TV remote control to the right of it, for reference)

    From what I hear, people rarely buy or transport any more than this at a time at the end user level.

    The only way you'll see federal intervention is on the books--when a business tries to sell the stuff legally under state laws, they would run into federal enforcement when they file their taxes. I'd expect one unlucky but famous shop owner is gonna have a court case named after them.

  6. #16
    Senior Member swordpath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udog View Post
    Marijuana use is still against Federal law, so it won't be quite that easy.

    Looks like Washington state also voted to make recreational use legal, though.
    Stoners should have voted for Romney - more emphasis on state's rights and less on federal govt.

  7. #17
    Senior Member swordpath's Avatar
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    I'm curious how places like Amsterdam are affected by the legality of Marijuana. Shouldn't the U.S. know pretty much what to expect based off of other countries where weed is legal?

  8. #18
    F CK all I need is U ilikeitlikethat's Avatar
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    I wish Croydon relaxed it's marijuana laws.

    There's a vote soon anyway, asking us what the police should crack down on.

  9. #19
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swordpath View Post
    I'm curious how places like Amsterdam are affected by the legality of Marijuana. Shouldn't the U.S. know pretty much what to expect based off of other countries where weed is legal?
    Well, the joke of getting a policeman to hold your purse while you light your joint won't be an Amsterdam exclusive anymore I guess. Marihuana being legal, imo, takes away anarchistic behaviour and brings responsibility more into the picture. Well, at least as far as people are also responsible drinkers.

    To be fair though, law in the netherlands (under pressure of EU and US) on marihuana has been limited to cardholders and dutch natives only. At least if you want to aquire it legally(That and dutch citizens are allowe three plants iirc for personal use). Perhaps that will be overturned as well as more countries and US states will legalize it though.

    Granted, I'm not all that up to date about marihuana laws here in The Netherlands since I don't use it.
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  10. #20
    Senior Member EvidenceOfRedemption's Avatar
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    Another thing that occurred to me... once local retail becomes more common, I think we'll see a shift from the carry limit level of 1 oz to more legistlation on DUI levels. If you think of alcohol, when is it ever an issue of someone buying too many bottles at once and taking it home with them? Weed I expect would become the same way, how much someone has really is irrelevant but DUI should see stricter regulations.

    Something that should be interesting to see too is how this will effect travel to neighboring states and Canada. Will you be more likely to be pulled over in Oregon and Idaho, or get your vehicle searched entering into Canada, for instance.

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