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  1. #1
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    Default Clint Eastwood says his convention appearance was 'mission accomplished'

    Frankly, I completely agree.

    I thought the speech was brilliant, for a number of reasons.

    And the greatest thing is seeing members of our liberal media twist and turn about it, completely missing the point.

    Eastwood says his convention appearance was 'mission accomplished'

    By PAUL MILLER
    Published: September 7, 2012

    AFTER A week as topic No. 1 in American politics, former Carmel Mayor Clint Eastwood said the outpouring of criticism from left-wing reporters and liberal politicians after his appearance at the Republican National Convention last Thursday night, followed by an avalanche of support on Twitter and in the blogosphere, is all the proof anybody needs that his 12-minute discourse achieved exactly what he intended it to.

    “President Obama is the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people,” Eastwood told The Pine Cone this week. “Romney and Ryan would do a much better job running the country, and that’s what everybody needs to know. I may have irritated a lot of the lefties, but I was aiming for people in the middle.”

    Breaking his silence

    For five days after he thrilled or horrified the nation by talking to an empty chair representing Obama on the night Mitt Romney accepted the Republican nomination for president, Eastwood remained silent while pundits and critics debated whether his remarks, and the rambling way he made them, had helped or hurt Romney’s chances of winning in November.

    But in a wide-ranging interview with The Pine Cone Tuesday from his home in Pebble Beach, he said he had conveyed the messages he wanted to convey, and that the spontaneous nature of his presentation was intentional, too.

    “I had three points I wanted to make,” Eastwood said. “That not everybody in Hollywood is on the left, that Obama has broken a lot of the promises he made when he took office, and that the people should feel free to get rid of any politician who’s not doing a good job. But I didn’t make up my mind exactly what I was going to say until I said it.”

    Eastwood’s appearance at the convention came after a personal request from Romney in August, soon after Eastwood endorsed the former Massachusetts governor at a fundraiser in Sun Valley, Idaho. But it was finalized only in the last week before the convention, along with an agreement to build suspense by keeping it secret until the last moment.

    Meanwhile, Romney’s campaign aides asked for details about what Eastwood would say to the convention.

    “They vet most of the people, but I told them, ‘You can’t do that with me, because I don’t know what I’m going to say,’” Eastwood recalled.

    And while the Hollywood superstar has plenty of experience being adored by crowds, he said he hasn’t given a lot of speeches and admitted that, “I really don’t know how to.” He also hates using a teleprompter, so it was settled in his mind that when he spoke to the 10,000 people in the convention hall, and the millions more watching on television, he would do it extemporaneously.

    “It was supposed to be a contrast with all the scripted speeches, because I’m Joe Citizen,” Eastwood said. “I’m a movie maker, but I have the same feelings as the average guy out there.”

    Eastwood is a liberal on social issues such as gay marriage and abortion, but he has strongly conservative opinions about the colossal national debt that has accumulated while Obama has been president, his failure to get unemployment below 6 percent, and a host of other economic issues.

    “Even people on the liberal side are starting to worry about going off a fiscal cliff,” Eastwood said.


    Last minute decisions

    But what — exactly — would he say to the Republican delegates about the $16 trillion national debt and 8.3 percent unemployment rate?

    Friends and associates weren’t as much help as he had hoped.

    “Everybody had advice for me, except the janitor,” Eastwood said.

    Early Thursday morning, when Eastwood left San Jose Airport on a private jet headed for Florida, he was still making up his mind. And even with his appearance just a few hours away, all Eastwood could tell Romney’s campaign manager, Matt Rhoades, and his aides, was “to reassure them that everything I would say would be nice about Mitt Romney.”

    It was only after a quick nap in his hotel room a few blocks from the convention site, Eastwood said, that he mapped out his remarks — starting with his observation about politics in Hollywood, then challenging the president about the failure of his economic policies, and wrapping up by telling the public “they don’t have to worship politicians, like they were royalty or something.”

    But even then, with just an hour before he appeared on stage, it still hadn’t occurred to Eastwood to use an empty chair as a stand-in for the president.

    “I got to the convention site just 15 or 20 minutes before I was scheduled to go on,” he said. “That was fine, because everything was very well organized.”

    After a quick trip through airport-style security, he was taken to a Green Room, where Archbishop Dolan of New York sought him out to say hello. Then he was taken backstage to wait for his cue. And that was when inspiration struck.

    “There was a stool there, and some fella kept asking me if I wanted to sit down,” Eastwood said. “When I saw the stool sitting there, it gave me the idea. I’ll just put the stool out there and I’ll talk to Mr. Obama and ask him why he didn’t keep all of the promises he made to everybody.”

    He asked a stagehand to take it out to the lectern while he was being announced.

    “The guy said, ‘You mean you want it at the podium?’ and I said, ‘No, just put it right there next to it.’”

    Then, with the theme song from “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” as a musical introduction, and a huge picture of him as Josey Wales as the backdrop, Eastwood walked out to tremendous applause.

    “The audience was super enthusiastic, and it’s always great when they’re with you instead of against you,” he said.


    ‘Enjoying themselves’

    Speaking without any notes, Eastwood recalled the good feelings the whole nation had when Obama was elected, but said they had been dashed as the economy stayed in the doldrums despite massive stimulus spending. He decried the “stupid idea” of closing the detention center at Guantanamo Bay and putting terrorists on trial in New York City, joked about Vice President Joe Biden’s intellect and quizzed empty-chair Obama about what he says to people about his failed economic policies. He pretended Obama told Romney to do something “physically impossible” to himself, said it’s time to elect a “stellar businessman” as president instead of a lawyer, and, as a final point, told the people, “You own this country.”

    When an elected official doesn’t “do the job, we’ve got to let ‘em go,” he said, and the crowd ate it up.

    “They really seemed to be enjoying themselves,” Eastwood said.

    Originally, he was told he could speak for six or seven minutes, and right before he went on, he was asked to keep it to five, but he said,

    “When people are applauding so much, it takes you 10 minutes to say five minutes’ worth.”

    Also, there were no signals or cues of any kind, so “when you’re out there, it’s kind of hard to tell how much time is going by.”

    He also said he was aware he hesitated and stumbled a bit, but said “that’s what happens when you don’t have a written-out speech.”

    As he wrapped up his remarks, he was aware his presentation was “very unorthodox,” but that was his intent from the beginning, even if some people weren’t on board.

    “They’ve got this crazy actor who’s 82 years old up there in a suit,” he said. “I was a mayor, and they’re probably thinking I know how to give a speech, but even when I was mayor I never gave speeches. I gave talks.”

    Backstage, it was all congratulations and glad-handing, he said. And then he returned to the Green Room, where he listened to speeches by Marco Rubio and Mitt Romney. It wasn’t possible for him to watch the media coverage of his presentation.

    But the country was listening as the television reporters and commentators covering his speech reacted to it. And they hated it.

    “I have to say, as a fan, a movie fan, this was exceedingly strange. It just seemed like a very strange, unscripted moment,” said a shocked Andrea Mitchell on NBC.

    “That was the weirdest thing I’ve ever seen at a political convention in my entire life,” said Rachel Maddow on MSNBC, barely concealing the condescension in her voice.

    Bob Schieffer of CBS said it was “a big mistake to put Clint Eastwood on before Mitt Romney.”

    On the Washington Post website, reporter Chris Cillizza wrote that “‘awkward’ may be the kindest term we can think of” to describe Eastwood’s speech.

    “He hemmed. He hawed. He mumbled. He rambled,” Cillizza wrote.

    And on CNN, Piers Morgan said Eastwood was “going bonkers” on the stage and said his presentation “looked like complete chaos.” He pressured his guests with questions like, “Weren’t you in pain while he was up there?”

    But Eastwood wasn’t aware of any of it, and after the speeches were over, Romney and his running mate, Paul Ryan, came backstage to thank him.

    “They were very enthusiastic, and we were all laughing,” Eastwood said.

    When he went outside to his car, a large crowd cheered and chanted lines from his speech.


    An overnight rebellion

    Back at his hotel, Eastwood had a room service dinner and went to bed. The next morning, he got up early and went straight to the airport, still unaware that his appearance was the No. 1 political topic in the nation.

    “I read the Tampa newspaper, and every article said something negative about the convention, but there wasn’t much about me,” Eastwood said.

    He had no idea that overnight, a rebellion had erupted online against the media’s condemnation of him, with thousands of bloggers, Twitterers and commentators calling him, “a genius,” “1,000 times more brilliant than the media,” and saying he’s “only gotten better with age.”

    They also started posting their own versions of Eastwood’s empty chair in droves (“eastwooding”), and, on YouTube, replays of his remarks at the convention were being viewed millions of times.

    Even into his 80s, Eastwood has an unprecedented record of success in Hollywood, and is still making two movies a year. He’s currently starring in “Trouble with the Curve,” and is about to direct a remake of “A Star is Born” — things he obviously couldn’t do if he were a befuddled senior citizen. To locals who know him, the idea that he is uninformed or senile is laughable.

    Nevertheless, the bitter criticism has continued.

    On Tuesday, Democratic Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa, called Eastwood “the perfect icon of the Republican tea party: an angry old white man spewing incoherent nonsense.”

    Eastwood said people, including reporters, who were shocked by his remarks “are obviously on the left,” and he maintained that, while many Americans didn’t like the way he handled his convention appearance, millions more have something else on their minds.

    “A lot of people are realizing they had the wool pulled over their eyes by Obama,” Eastwood said.
    http://www.pineconearchive.com/120907-1.html
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    He was aiming for people "in the middle" and he thinks he accomplished his mission? I'm trying to figure out how his performance could have accomplished such a mission, but I'm not seeing it. He presented no new data, nor did he present any new insight. The book you mentioned in a different thread is far more compelling than this performance by Eastwood.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

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    Perhaps these two pieces will shed some light on it:

    The Brilliance of Clint’s Empty Chair

    by Justin Katz on August 31, 2012
    in Culture & Family, Politics - Opinion
    Comments (155)

    Politicos and policy wonks have been parsing every major speech offered at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, each with his or her own lens. (The exception is MSNBC, which apparently declined to parse several speeches by ethnic minorities.) Some have commented on the gender-war content of Ann Romney’s statements; some have focused on the deep policy weeds of Vice-Presidential Candidate Paul Ryan.

    But the most transformative moment — in its way, the most redolent of the Tea Party revolution — was Clint Eastwood’s conversation with an empty chair in which President Obama was not sitting.

    One of the clearest tidbits recalled from my playwright studies was a device that effectively made a murder victim present on the stage. On a set of his house, during an interview scene with family members, the script called for the actor playing a detective to lean his hand on the dead character’s favorite rocking chair and “inadvertently” set it in motion.

    What Clint Eastwood emphasized, with his seemingly improvised chat with the invisible Obama was the absurd notion of having a man-to-man talk with the Vogue-interviewee president. Eastwood was a real celebrity expressing common-man ideas to a celebrity commander in chief.

    Even more, Eastwood’s fame is founded in his being a character actor whose chief characteristic is to cut through nonsense. Tough and real; doing what needs to be done.

    Viewers who found the speech peculiar (mainly those in academia, entertainment, and media, I’d wager) may have done so because Eastwood used a theatrical device in the service of the wrong script… from their point of view and according to their expectations. As a thought experiment, they should imagine some other actor’s using the exact same gimmick at the Democrat National Convention, with a non-present Mitt Romney.

    To be sure, an invisible, unapproachable businessman would be much more to type than a “populist,” progressive community organizer, just as the Occupy movement is much more in keeping with the established images of grassroots activism than the Tea Party.

    Beyond the screen writer’s flair, though, the feel of Clint Eastwood’s convention speech was not of soaring political rhetoric, but of a movie awards ceremony, as if he were speaking to an audience of peers. And there again is the unique character that he has been in the public imagination, as if we the people are his peers, not the glitzy stars. He introduced himself to the GOP audience as a “movie tradesman.”

    What Eastwood did, with his extemporaneous air and unfilled chair, was to call bull**** on the increasingly untenable narrative that the Left has been weaving through all of the public institutions that it has spent decades infiltrating. He elevated to TV Land the shocking breach of story line and etiquette that hit YouTube years ago when angry citizens shouted down their Senators at town hall meetings.

    The speech may not be a pivot point to a new reality in Hollywood, and the political side it serves may not win the day in November, but to the guardians of the elite, it was definitely a statement new, even though to the rest of us it was a very familiar sensation.

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    Why the criticism and mockery of Clint Eastwood will backfire.

    September 1, 2012

    Obama supporters are straining to nullify Clint Eastwood's GOP convention performance, but it's not going to work. Take, for example, Michael Moore, writing in The Daily Beast, which embeds the full-length video of what it labels "Clint's Crazy Speech." Moore — who everyone knows is a left-wing propagandist — says:

    The footage of Eastwood rambling and mumbling to his "Harvey"—President Obama—will be played to audiences a hundred years from now as the Most Bizarre Convention Moment Ever. The people of the future will know nothing about Dirty Harry or Josey Wales or Million Dollar Baby. They will know about the night a crazy old man hijacked a national party's most important gathering so he could literally tell the president to go do something to himself (i.e. fuck himself). In those few moments (and these days, it only takes a few moments—see Anthony Weiner), he completely upended and redefined how he'll be remembered by younger and future generations....

    Who won't watch the video now? Most people didn't watch the convention and therefore didn't see the speech in its context, within which it was anomalous. Eastwood wasn't speechifying to the huge crowd from a teleprompted script. He was seemingly speaking straight from his head — you know, the illusion actors know how to create. It had an intimacy and riskiness that you just don't expect from a convention stage. That's what made it so much fun for people who are rooting for Romney, but it also the invited ridicule from those who want Obama to win.

    Accepting that invitation is taking the bait. And look what is happening. Millions of folks who didn't bother watching the convention are watching Eastwood's performance out of the context within which it was anomalous. They're watching viral video.

    You expect viral video to be surprising and weird in some way. And the intimacy and riskiness of the performance is cool in the context of a little window on your computer. You listen to exactly what Clint says as you hang in there waiting for it to be as crazy as the Obama promoters are claiming. And you have whatever love for Clint Eastwood you happen to bring to this little project of watching a viral video. And there is a lot of love out there. These people are throwing hate at a guy you have loved, so, okay, let's see what's so terrible.

    Should Obama supporters be spreading this viral video? Should they want the moderate undecideds of the country sitting at their computers attending to lines like:

    But — you know about — I remember three and a half years ago, when Mr. Obama won the election. And though I was not a big supporter, I was watching that night when he was having that thing and they were talking about hope and change and they were talking about, yes we can, and it was dark outdoors, and it was nice, and people were lighting candles.

    They were saying, I just thought, this was great. Everybody is trying, Oprah was crying.

    I was even crying. And then finally — and I haven’t cried that hard since I found out that there is 23 million unemployed people in this country.

    Now that is something to cry for because that is a disgrace, a national disgrace, and we haven’t done enough, obviously — this administration hasn’t done enough to cure that. Whatever interest they have is not strong enough, and I think possibly now it may be time for somebody else to come along and solve the problem.

    Imagine some uncommitted voter clicks on the embedded video, predisposed to laugh at the crazy old man, and then — alone at the computer — encounters the beloved elder talking about things that have made him cry. They might not laugh. They might be drawn in by Eastwood's performance. They might not take direction from people like Moore who've instructed them to mock. That uncommitted voter might prefer the direction of the far greater director, Clint Eastwood.
    .

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    Sounds like someone got butthurt to write that wall'o'text, and someone else more so to respost it =X



    Though I agree, of course, had the Democrats pulled such a stunt, I would be staring at an exact mirror image of events. Though instead of mockery on Jon Stewart, it'd be closer to anger on www.foxnation.com.

  6. #6
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    It seems to me like a lot of Republicans noted that as the low point of the convention and saw it as a potential threat to Mitt Romney's speech and the convention in general. Maybe I'm remembering it wrong, but I doubt it.

    So, rather this all being the product of a vast left-wing media conspiracy, it's probably because it was unorthodox, obviously improvised (I mean that in a bad way), and sometimes bordered on what is considered inappropriate for that sort of setting, like the joke about Mitt Romney doing something to himself. I even thought that joke was a little funny, but I was also surprised someone would say that at the Republican convention.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


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    Quote Originally Posted by jontherobot View Post
    Sounds like someone got butthurt to write that wall'o'text, and someone else more so to respost it =X
    Ummm... no.

    A lot of people actually thought the speech was brilliant.

    Myself included.

    Quote Originally Posted by jontherobot View Post
    Though I agree, of course, had the Democrats pulled such a stunt, I would be staring at an exact mirror image of events. Though instead of mockery on Jon Stewart, it'd be closer to anger on www.foxnation.com.
    I'm sort of a hipster when it comes to Jon Stewart.

    I really liked him when he first took over The Daily Show for Craig Kilborn, but, while I still like him, his (and Colbert's) desperate shilling for the Democrat Party has grown tiresome. I loved watching him get smoked by John Lee, though, and the subsequent apology he felt he had to make.

    http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/mo...nterview-pt--1
    http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/mo...john-yoo-pt--2
    http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/mo...nterview-pt--3

    http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tu...ew-reflections

    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    It seems to me like a lot of Republicans noted that as the low point of the convention and saw it as a potential threat to Mitt Romney's speech and the convention in general. Maybe I'm remembering it wrong, but I doubt it.
    I know a lot of Republicans who thought it was awesome, and a high-point of the convention.

    I know a lot of Democrats, though, who hope your proposed narrative is correct.

    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    So, rather this all being the product of a vast left-wing media conspiracy, it's probably because it was unorthodox, obviously improvised (I mean that in a bad way), and sometimes bordered on what is considered inappropriate for that sort of setting, like the joke about Mitt Romney doing something to himself. I even thought that joke was a little funny, but I was also surprised someone would say that at the Republican convention.
    I don't think it's some sort of vast left-wing media conspiracy.

    I genuinely think their heads are so far up their asses they can't see the brilliance that it possesses.

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    @Zarathustra


    You said last night you do not speak to advocate position, yet these defensive pieces now exist on the board.


    If you thought the speech was brilliant, wouldn't a verbatim script of his speech been more in order for the masses?





    Yes, I do not watch Jon Stewart much anymore either, though I do find the show still relevant when I do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jontherobot View Post
    @<a href="http://www.typologycentral.com/forums/member.php?u=8413" target="_blank">Zarathustra</a>
    You said last night you do not speak to advocate position...
    I don't know if that's how I'd put it...

    Quote Originally Posted by jontherobot View Post
    ...yet these defensive pieces now exist on the board.
    I don't know if that's how I'd put them, either.

    Quote Originally Posted by jontherobot View Post
    If you thought the speech was brilliant, wouldn't a verbatim script of his speech been more in order for the masses?
    Well, that would be one way.

    The other, would be to just post the speech itself (which I already did in another thread).

    Anyway, I'll go for the latter (although, I'd considered doing the former, with my commentary included).

    Quote Originally Posted by jontherobot View Post
    Yes, I do not watch Jon Stewart much anymore either, though I do find the show still relevant when I do.
    It is funny, and he's a good guy.

    Their (tbh, tho, Colbert's are worse) constant blatantly left-wing facebook posts are obnoxious, tho.

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