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  1. #71
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fia View Post
    Besides the fact that there is science that stands against that, so far we are not talking about fatal dog attacks, right? The case about the children with guns happened in Wyoming where a little boy around age 6 shot his 3-year-old sister and caused her disabilities. He did not go to prison over it or adult court.

    It is a mistake to compare a 15-year-old who commits brutal murder to a dog that bites someone. A better comparison would be children who bite someone and causes a wound - which from what I understand, does happen without legal recourse. It is good that children are only held to the level of responsibility for which they are wired. Animals should be as well.
    So you're saying that if a pit bull commits murder, they shouldn't be put down? What about guard dogs that are trained to attack, accidentally gaining freedom from confinement, assaulting people and killing children?

  2. #72
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andante View Post
    So you're saying that if a pit bull commits murder, they shouldn't be put down? What about guard dogs that are trained to attack, accidentally gaining freedom from confinement, assaulting people and killing children?
    No, I was verifying that we are not talking about fatal animal attacks. The argument to put an animal down who commits fatal attacks is more reasonable than for one who has just bitten someone. My main point is that humans who kill are not equivalent to animals who bite. Are there cases of guard dogs getting loose and killing children?

    In an ideal world, there would be a facility for those animals. There is a wolf rescue that I visited that is housing some wolf-dog mixes who were causing a lot of problems towards other animals.

    Ultimately humans are responsible for the breeding and raising of animals. Because of this, a moral case can be made that we are to take responsibility where the animal cannot. When a problem occurs, we need to address it in a responsible manner. It is just too easy to kill any creature that behaves in an inconvenient manner. Some animals can be rehabilitated, and some animals can be cared for with the right facilities. In all cases they are not guilty but are simply acting out the breeding and conditioning that human society is responsible for creating. It is reasonable to want safety, and reasonable to correct problems that place safety at risk, but that should always be done in the most respectful and humane manner possible.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

  3. #73
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fia View Post
    No, I was verifying that we are not talking about fatal animal attacks. The argument to put an animal down who commits fatal attacks is more reasonable than for one who has just bitten someone. My main point is that humans who kill are not equivalent to animals who bite. Are there cases of guard dogs getting loose and killing children?

    In an ideal world, there would be a facility for those animals. There is a wolf rescue that I visited that is housing some wolf-dog mixes who were causing a lot of problems towards other animals.

    Ultimately humans are responsible for the breeding and raising of animals. Because of this, a moral case can be made that we are to take responsibility where the animal cannot. When a problem occurs, we need to address it in a responsible manner. It is just too easy to kill any creature that behaves in an inconvenient manner. Some animals can be rehabilitated, and some animals can be cared for with the right facilities. In all cases they are not guilty but are simply acting out the breeding and conditioning that human society is responsible for creating. It is reasonable to want safety, and reasonable to correct problems that place safety at risk, but that should always be done in the most respectful and humane manner possible.
    This is an ideal world scenario. Not reality. In order to create your ideal world, there are many pragmatic considerations, including money and resources. There will also need to be redrafting of laws that surround pet ownership, including creation of new law that puts more responsibility onto owners for their poorly trained animals.

    Overall, if there's a problem animal, the most cost effective way to handle the animal is to put it down. Unless you and other animal apologists are willing to buck up and take care of every improperly trained animal, the laws will remain the same and that's to put down aggressive animals.

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