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  1. #201

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    Statasys is acting under incorrect assumptions, maybe knowingly. A good tip off is that they just don't want to even talk about the legality, there is obviously something to talk about. But, I wouldn't blame them for finding any reason for pulling the lease on a man creating firearms with their equipment and publishing it in a blog.. which happened to make waves when he first started the project on the sites I read.
    Quote Originally Posted by sprinkles View Post
    I don't think they'd be able to do that if he actually owned the printer. He was leasing it so it actually wasn't his property. Kind of a lame thing for the company to do though.
    I really don't understand how they had so little foresight about the capabilities of this technology, legal or not. I can't think of an effective way to police this sort of activity. I just can't. The ramifications for this tech. seem huge and far beyond just mass-weapons manufacturing.

    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

  2. #202
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwakar View Post
    I really don't understand how they had so little foresight about the capabilities of this technology, legal or not. I can't think of an effective way to police this sort of activity. I just can't. The ramifications for this tech. seem huge and far beyond just mass-weapons manufacturing.

    It's not nearly as dangerous as it sounds, at least not moreso than now. Guns are actually easy to make, you just need something to hold a bullet and a firing pin. People have been making 'garage guns' and 'zip guns' without 3D printing technology.

    At the moment, the thing that would take actual skill for the average person is creating a forged/rifled barrel, which is what makes a gun actually worth a damn in accuracy, and also the tolerances to make something reliable.. unless you're going for some sort of messy shotgun/zip gun thing. You can't really get that with 3D printing technology.

  3. #203

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    It's not nearly as dangerous as it sounds, at least not moreso than now. Guns are actually easy to make, you just need something to hold a bullet and a firing pin. People have been making 'garage guns' and 'zip guns' without 3D printing technology.

    At the moment, the thing that would take actual skill for the average person is creating a forged/rifled barrel, which is what makes a gun actually worth a damn in accuracy.. unless you're going for some sort of messy shotgun/zip gun thing. You can't really get that with 3D printing technology.
    I'm not just talking in terms of dangerous effects, so much as broad impact positive and negative. I was listening to this story on NPR last month about toy and furniture manufacturers losing a bundle of cash because consumers were using 3D printing technology to replace broken parts on strollers and washing machines etc. rather than paying for replacements to the manufacturers. They were saving a bundle, not to mention no shipping costs. There were ingenious individuals coming up with the "printing blueprints" for these items and freesharing them on the web.

    And for any of you who have ever had to pay $12.95 for a piece of plastic (plus $5.95 shipping and handling) that goes on your dryer door, you know what I'm talking about.


    As for guns specifically, I wonder how gun shops feel about the tech. I would think mixed feelings...?
    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

  4. #204
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwakar View Post
    I'm not just talking in terms of dangerous effects, so much as broad impact positive and negative. I was listening to this story on NPR last month about toy and furniture manufacturers losing a bundle of cash because consumers were using 3D printing technology to replace broken parts on strollers and washing machines etc. rather than paying for replacements to the manufacturers. They were saving a bundle, not to mention no shipping costs. There were ingenious individuals coming up with the "printing blueprints" for these items and freesharing them on the web.

    And for any of you who have ever had to pay $12.95 for a piece of plastic (plus $5.95 shipping and handling) that goes on your dryer door, you know what I'm talking about.


    As for guns specifically, I wonder how gun shops feel about the tech. I would think mixed feelings...?
    Oh, yes.. I mean, some of us have been wanting this for decades. This is basically what I've been dreaming about since I read Alvin Toffler's Third Wave when I was in middle school. The idea of a 'super-industrial' era and personal manufacturing. Policy makers of course may not have understood what's going on as much as futurists.

    I have a feeling gun shops are just laughing at it, for the same reasons I mentioned that 3d printing isn't capable of making a 'real gun'. Maybe someday 3D machining will be accessible to average people, but that equipment is inaccessible to the individual, and is even prohibitively expensive and hard to operate for a cooperative.

  5. #205
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    It's not nearly as dangerous as it sounds, at least not moreso than now. Guns are actually easy to make, you just need something to hold a bullet and a firing pin. People have been making 'garage guns' and 'zip guns' without 3D printing technology.

    At the moment, the thing that would take actual skill for the average person is creating a forged/rifled barrel, which is what makes a gun actually worth a damn in accuracy, and also the tolerances to make something reliable.. unless you're going for some sort of messy shotgun/zip gun thing. You can't really get that with 3D printing technology.
    That can be done after the printing. Google will show how.
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  6. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by phobik View Post
    That can be done after the printing. Google will show how.
    Yes, but that takes skills and yet more specialized equipment and materials, which is the thing separating the making of a garage-gun and a real-gun without 3D printing.

  7. #207
    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwakar View Post
    I'm not just talking in terms of dangerous effects, so much as broad impact positive and negative. I was listening to this story on NPR last month about toy and furniture manufacturers losing a bundle of cash because consumers were using 3D printing technology to replace broken parts on strollers and washing machines etc. rather than paying for replacements to the manufacturers. They were saving a bundle, not to mention no shipping costs. There were ingenious individuals coming up with the "printing blueprints" for these items and freesharing them on the web.

    And for any of you who have ever had to pay $12.95 for a piece of plastic (plus $5.95 shipping and handling) that goes on your dryer door, you know what I'm talking about.


    As for guns specifically, I wonder how gun shops feel about the tech. I would think mixed feelings...?
    It's great if you have access to a 3D printer but all things considered, most of the time it's just cheaper to buy the part.

    I doubt the story about manufacturers losing money has any truth to it - at least not any more truth than people who make things with molds.

    I've seen people pour molds for replacement steering wheels and tail lights and all kinds of things, and it's cheaper than a 3D printer. You also don't even need a schematic to mold a duplicate part. Even if the part is broken you can glue it back together then cast it to make a new master from it, which you can smooth down and cast again to create a mold which duplicates the part as if it were never broken.

  8. #208
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    Yes, but that takes skills and yet more specialized equipment and materials, which is the thing separating the making of a garage-gun and a real-gun without 3D printing.
    You might want to rephrase that after you google.
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  9. #209
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phobik View Post
    You might want to rephrase that after you google.
    Doubt it, maybe I'll rephrase it after you post some kind of reference. But I've got a pretty good feel of what kinds of processes are need to make thing with high tolerances, and what current home-accessible technologies are capable of.

  10. #210
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    Doubt it, maybe I'll rephrase it after you post some kind of reference. But I've got a pretty good feel of what kinds of processes are need to make thing with high tolerances, and what current home-accessible technologies are capable of.
    This is as bothered as I can get:
    http://bit.ly/StUyUW
    To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.
    ~ Elbert Hubbard

    Music provides one of the clearest examples of a much deeper relation between mathematics and human experience.

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