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  1. #1

    Default Human and Animal Intelligences

    What do you think about recent research into the cognitive capacities of dogs? The are, scientists believe, capable of cognitive processes and are not entirely affect-instinct driven. What about the theory of multiple intelligences and all animals? Is this something you've thought about or never thought about?

  2. #2
    Ginkgo
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    Dogs respond to stimulus but they don't respond to an awareness that they are being stimulated because they lack the complexity of introspection humans do. Even if they do respond to an awareness that they are being stimulated (which is something I felt I've witnessed on occasion), it seems to be less frequent in the patterns of their behaviors. Humans express patterns of behavior that tend to be quite fixed as well, performing the same tasks with variations of detail. The detail indicates that even in our wrote exercises, we grasp problems of multiple parts. The more parts we learn, the more our behavior tends to shift. If animals simply cannot grasp these parts because we attempt to engender them through entirely different means than they are capable of being aware of, who is to say that because of this learning deficit, they are more or less able to solve problems in general?

    Like humans, the vast majority of their ability to survive lies in their instinct, seemingly dormant because, in a way very similar to us, they cannot quite comprehend the subtle mechanisms their cells, tissues, organs, and systems provide for them on a regular basis. Even unicellular organisms possess a sort of intelligence that presumably differs from our cognitive faculties. Our egos sometimes seem to only inhibit us from learning when we limit ourselves to fixed modes of understanding, rather than perceiving the world on a more rudimentary, symbolic level. Organized education only serves to organize us in the end.

    EDIT: WTF? Politics/History section?

  3. #3
    Starcrossed Seafarer Aquarelle's Avatar
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    I am 100% sure that my dog is capable of cognitive processes.
    Masquerading as a normal person day after day is exhausting.

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    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Hmm, my father trains german shephards. There is definately difference in cognative functions in dogs. Having grown up with many of them.

    There often seems to be clear differences between more intuitive or more sensing personalities. However, pretty much all german shephards seem to lack perceiver mentalities. They all like to work and work really hard.

    Also the ability of some of the dogs I grew up with to solve complex problems, whilest others seemed incapable of that (without training) could very well mean that there is a dichotomy between T and F in dogs.

    For example, my father had dogs that could open their kennel from the inside out just by observing how it was opened by humans, whilest others never learned such tricks. Even though the opening of the kennels would require them to pull on a slide and the pull the kennel door inwards instead of outwards.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

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    Starcrossed Seafarer Aquarelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    For example, my father had dogs that could open their kennel from the inside out just by observing how it was opened by humans, whilest others never learned such tricks. Even though the opening of the kennels would require them to pull on a slide and the pull the kennel door inwards instead of outwards.
    Yup. My dog learned to swim from another dog, no joke. He was always kind of scared of the water and didn't want to go in further than he could stand, until this one older, female labrador went after a ball, and he followed her out with his head even with her shoulder. She showed him how to paddle right and keep his head low, and since that day he has loved swimming.

    Also one day, he was chewing on a bone. My dog brought the bone over to me, and my spouse and I were talking about how many teeth marks were in it, and I said to my spouse, "At least he's not chewing pieces off of it" (as he is often wont to do). My dog looked at me, walked over to the floor behind the ottoman where he'd been chewing, and came back over to me. He looked at me again and slowly opened his mouth, showing me a chewed off piece of the bone.
    Masquerading as a normal person day after day is exhausting.

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  6. #6
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    I think animals definitely have affective capacity and because of that are direct moral agents. I think we should Foster alternate cognitive spaces such as those found in animals. I definitely think the modern civil rights issue of our time is centered around neural neutrality.
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  7. #7
    Ginkgo
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    Watch how quickly the giraffe learns to walk.

    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kZW8e79Bm0"]OMGZ[/YOUTUBE]

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    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    Cognition vs. metacognition.

    Metacognition is really the thing that allows human animals to perform seemingly more complex reasoning than non human animals.

    Instinct vs. reasoning is an antiquated comparison IMO because any reasoning is going to be limited if one doesn't have metacognition, which goes beyond mere problem solving and into analyzing effective problem solving methods themselves by knowing efficient ways to actually go about learning something - being able to see your own process from outside the process, and modify it.

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    Senior Member Ism's Avatar
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    Sometimes I poke my cat's belly and he begins to fillet my skin to fleshy ribbons. It's kind of fun for a while, but then it starts to hurt.

    When I say 'Ow!,' though, he usually stops biting and starts licking me instead. And then he infects my wounds with his kitty saliva.

    But I do think he is aware enough to cut it out whenever I make it clear that I am not having as much fun. I've thought about it sometimes, but it's never gone beyond 'Well, I'm just glad he listens.'

  10. #10
    WALMART
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    there are various methods in which all brains operate. i believe dogs' brains operate similarly to ours, they are simply unable to develop as many neural pathways in as efficient a manner as us.

    but yeah, they're "there".

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