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  1. #11
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    Sheltering a kid is never a good idea; most other kids, with their abundant curiosity, will venture and learn things in the world that some adult fear them to know; what sex is, cuss words, violence in the media, etc. Most kids become accustome to these things without their parents really knowing. A sheltered kid on the other hand, will be at an ignorant disadvantage; they naive understanding of certain things in life will leave them vulnerable to social exlusion and teasing. That ain't a fun thing to grow up with.

    In fact, South Park is a fairly accurate portrayl of how kids really act, with somebody like Butters being one of the more 'sheltered' kids. Although the one specific episode that highlights the danger of over-sheltering children is the episode Hooked on Monkey Fonics; where two homeschool kids are so restrained by over-strict parents that they fail to understand the actual social mechanisms of real life.

    If I ever do reproduce (or adopt) and posess minions children, I'm going to freely cuss, talk about vulgar things, let them watch R rated films, etc.

    Also, wow to the OP; no letting kids have NERF guns? Some damn idiotic libtards right there.

  2. #12
    You have a choice! 21%'s Avatar
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    I learned from my own experience that you can't 'shelter' kids from anything. My mom threw away our ghost story books because she thought they were poison, and I ended up reading a bunch at my cousin's anyway.

    Kids should be raised with awareness of how the real world is and how to keep themselves safe. I have never learned anything that I wish to 'unlearn'. So, if I ever have kids, I'll be extremely honest about everything so they won't have to go out and get partial, misleading bits of information elsewhere.
    4w5 sp/sx EII

  3. #13
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
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    I don't have a problem with guns themselves, what i have a problem with is the encouragement of feeling the thrill of a kill.

    I do have issues with some of these terrible computer games, games where you are commended for beating up prostitues/selling drugs/killing everyone and stealing is advocated.
    The issue i have is that it teaches a violent and cold mindset, desensitizes the real life impact of these actions.

    I allow my 12 year old son to play some of the shoot em up style games because we have had many discussions about what is real and not, what is right and wrong. However i delayed him having any type of console until he reached secondary school (well actually the summer beforhand).

    He also has an air rifle though i did not ever buy him plastic guns as a youngster. (He did have a couple of plastic guns...one he won in a fairground and i think he was given another). He sometimes goes to a rifle shooting range and is very responsible in his understanding of the damage that can be caused by shooting a person etc.

    IMO it's all about educating a child, teaching them how things translate in the real world and what the outcomes would/could be with certain actions. Once they have a good understanding of this you can continue to guide them in the informed choices they make.
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

  4. #14
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    Elementary school aged children do not need to know anything about sex... They don't need to hear bad language or violence.
    I will never feel differently about that.
    I don't believe in changing to match the world. I'm fi ffs haha

    I do however believe in educating them age appropriately as they grow and ask questions.

    Innocence is such a beautiful thing. Children have a right to it IMO.
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  5. #15
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    It's definitely a tightrope that has to be walked.

    My parents are prime examples of the extremes, honestly.

    My mother was very protected by her patriarchal father and raised in a very sheltered environment. So she was a very sweet and innocent person when she reached adulthood and that part of her is endearing; but she was also unable to take care of herself and was horribly taken advantage of by more world-canny people in life, being very gullible and unsuspecting and kind of ignorant in many ways of the typical realities of day to day existence. It made her innocence less effectual.

    My father was the opposite -- a total mess, no boundaries, getting into everything, complete NON-innocent. He's pretty much stayed in the sewer all his life and has been dragged down by his own cyncism, as he judges everyone based on what he would do to them if he had the upper hand. Trust isn't really an option for him.

    Neither was effectual as if they would have been if they had been better parented and had developed a balance of innocent and knowledge. That phrase attributed to Jesus -- about being as innocent as doves and cunning as serpents -- comes to mind here.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  6. #16
    Bunnies & Rainbow Socks Kayness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Great One View Post
    Of course you're strict you're an ENTJ 1 for God's sake. LMAO
    As amusing I find you, I'm starting to contemplate buying you a filter for Christmas.
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kayness View Post
    As amusing I find you, I'm starting to contemplate buying you a filter for Christmas.

  8. #18
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Kids are ready to learn about certain things at certain times. I'm with Lady X, kids don't need to know about sex in elementary school, except maybe as a very abstract concept. Usually, they aren't interested, so it's not an issue.

    As far as guns, well.. my kids are living in the country now, it's actually safer for them to know someting about guns than not, as they are common tools out there. There's a universe of difference between playing with NERF guns and the use of real guns in violent actions, especially if a kid has an understanding of how dangerous a firearm actually is.

    I also believe in teaching the kids the basics of listening unconditionally to parents. When my kid is 3, I don't want spend every second worrying about her bolting into the street. I believe in teaching basic respect to theirs and other's bodies and property, and the skill to sit quiet for a reasonable amount of time. I'm irritated that some people find this as being strict parenting.

    Anyway, I'm out of the woods here. My youngest is now 8 and knows the basics.

  9. #19
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    My childhood was unnecessarily strict. My mother stopped me from watching a lot of movies that sort of defined the 80's and 90's, for example. Looking back, I wouldn't have necessarily understood the content she was so worried about.
    My own experience taught me that you can over protect children to their detriment. Already fairly shy, I became more isolated because I didn't always get cultural references. I don't think my mother understood how her rules and actions basically made my childhood a living hell.
    I'm not saying free for all, kids do need protection, but moderation is always a good thing. The gun stance is a bit unreasonable. I wouldn't necessarily buy my kid that stuff, but I wouldn't stop them from receiving gifts, and playing at other kids houses because of them. My mother did stuff like that all the time. I remember when she banned us from using the VCR for a year, because the heads got dirty and needed to be cleaned. Our only crime was my brother liked to watch Ralph the motor cycle mouse almost every day. It devasted my brother. I couldn't work out my mothers ratonale, except she never did understand the VCR....which I believe is a trap many parents fall into. Just because you don't understand, that's no reason to ban your kids from doing something, and really aren't you just perpetuating the problem?
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
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  10. #20
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    my mom told my the scientific side of sexual reproduction, but not the emotional side when i was 11. Also she didn't let us watch pg13 movies until we were 13. but i don't think i had that strict of a childhood. she was also anti-video games, trampolines, skateboards, and motorcycles. She was anti trampoline, skateboards, and motorcycles because my dad did one of his rotations in an ER and saw a lot people injured after using those things. so I don't think it was if we used them we'd turn out as bad kids, but more of she was geniunely concerned for our safety. I jumped on trampolines at friend's houses so its not like i was deprived
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

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