User Tag List

12 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 13

  1. #1
    Sweet Ocean Cloud SD45T-2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    1w2 so/sp
    Posts
    2,757

    Default America Has Too Many Teachers

    Public-school employees have doubled in 40 years while student enrollment has increased by only 8.5%—and academic results have stagnated.
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...LEFTTopOpinion
    1w2-6w5-3w2 so/sp

    "I took one those personality tests. It came back negative." - Dan Mintz

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sp/so
    Socionics
    IEI
    Posts
    2,841

    Default

    One alternative to that problem would be to reduce the overall number of teacher; however that solution would be downright awful. Cutting teachers away means larger class sizes, and when a class of students increases in size, it makes it far more difficult for the teacher to teach and/or control those students. Those low test scores that the U.S. has had over the last few decades? I can guarantee that they would worsen if there were less teachers than there are now.

    Rather is seems to me that the overal problem of public schooling isn't just one aspect, but instead many various aspects that are flawed in some way, and when accumulated together, result in a bad learning environment.

    Now I have heard that private schooling is far superior to public schooling; that students actually enjoy learning and that grades on average are higher. Of course the problem of private schools is just that; being private they charge high fees for student enrollment and thus are not accessable to every socio-economic class. Perhaps then, as a possible solution, that the tax payer money that other wise gets dumped into public schooling, could instead be directed to individual who enroll in private schools; that the government could subsidize people who attend private school. That way, students can aquire a superior education, but the possibility of entry is equal for everyone.

  3. #3
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    3h50
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    4,460

    Default

    This was inevitable, as the much-larger Millennial generation enters the teaching pool while we hit a lull in the generational cycle. Similar situation as in the mid-1970s.

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sp/so
    Socionics
    IEI
    Posts
    2,841

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    This was inevitable, as the much-larger Millennial generation enters the teaching pool while we hit a lull in the generational cycle. Similar situation as in the mid-1970s.
    What would your proposed solution be to this problem?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Posts
    6,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Idealist View Post
    One alternative to that problem would be to reduce the overall number of teacher; however that solution would be downright awful. Cutting teachers away means larger class sizes, and when a class of students increases in size, it makes it far more difficult for the teacher to teach and/or control those students. Those low test scores that the U.S. has had over the last few decades? I can guarantee that they would worsen if there were less teachers than there are now.

    Rather is seems to me that the overal problem of public schooling isn't just one aspect, but instead many various aspects that are flawed in some way, and when accumulated together, result in a bad learning environment.

    Now I have heard that private schooling is far superior to public schooling; that students actually enjoy learning and that grades on average are higher. Of course the problem of private schools is just that; being private they charge high fees for student enrollment and thus are not accessable to every socio-economic class. Perhaps then, as a possible solution, that the tax payer money that other wise gets dumped into public schooling, could instead be directed to individual who enroll in private schools; that the government could subsidize people who attend private school. That way, students can aquire a superior education, but the possibility of entry is equal for everyone.
    This biggest problems with education are philosophical, not financial. I think parenting has FAR more to do with the decline in education than class size. Perhaps we should start fining parents for poor performance/behavior by their children in school. That probably wouldn't work with poor families, but something needs to be done to motivate some parents to give a shit.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  6. #6
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    3h50
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    4,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Idealist View Post
    What would your proposed solution be to this problem?
    Not sure. I disagree with firing teachers, because that would be just one more private sector labor glut to raise unemployment. I know that private school subsidies won't work all too well. Private schools have a big advantage in that they get to be selective. Take away that selectivity, and you get all the problems of a public school, i.e. kids who do not want to be there.

    At the end of the day, you can't rely on institutional education to teach your kids the things they need to live in this world. It's an outdated model that is no longer relevant now that high school grads can't get instant industrial jobs.

  7. #7

    Default

    Class sizes and schools in the US are massive compared to the UK and NI or even the ROI.

  8. #8
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Class sizes and schools in the US are massive compared to the UK and NI or even the ROI.
    this

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sp/so
    Socionics
    IEI
    Posts
    2,841

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    This biggest problems with education are philosophical, not financial. I think parenting has FAR more to do with the decline in education than class size. Perhaps we should start fining parents for poor performance/behavior by their children in school. That probably wouldn't work with poor families, but something needs to be done to motivate some parents to give a shit.
    Please explain the link between how a parent teaches their kid, and how it effects their ability to function in school. And no, fining parents for having apathetic/intellectually-lazy kids would not work.

    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    Not sure. I disagree with firing teachers, because that would be just one more private sector labor glut to raise unemployment. I know that private school subsidies won't work all too well. Private schools have a big advantage in that they get to be selective. Take away that selectivity, and you get all the problems of a public school, i.e. kids who do not want to be there.
    Wait, couldn't subsidies be given out, and a private schools could still be selective? The school doesn't have to accept a new student even if they have the financial means of attending; there can be limitations and exlusions set in place so that the school doesn't become overcrowded with lazy or dim-witted students (or just too many students in general). If a potential student cannot attend one school they could try another school within their local area, and if that still weren't a possibility for them, then I think there should still be something in the way of a public school, albeit a lot smaller than the type of public schooling that we have now.

    At the end of the day, you can't rely on institutional education to teach your kids the things they need to live in this world. It's an outdated model that is no longer relevant now that high school grads can't get instant industrial jobs.
    I would beg to differ; there's plenty of knowledge in school that can be useful for real life (of course the same can be said for useless knowledge that doesn't help to serve any real purpose). However, I do acknowledge that the current education system is a broken mess and in drastic need of reconstruction.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Posts
    6,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Idealist View Post
    Please explain the link between how a parent teaches their kid, and how it effects their ability to function in school. And no, fining parents for having apathetic/intellectually-lazy kids would not work.
    You actually need me to explain how parenting can affect a child's ability to function in school? Seriously?
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

Similar Threads

  1. USA: Billboards Declare 'Too Many Abortions' in Black Community'
    By heart in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 02-24-2010, 04:37 AM
  2. Do too many people accept jobs that don't satisfy them?
    By Snow Turtle in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 05-06-2009, 12:59 PM
  3. Can someone ask too many questions?
    By Virtual ghost in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 02-12-2009, 02:04 PM
  4. Case of kissing too many frogs when searching for her prince?
    By Sahara in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-31-2007, 10:58 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO