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  1. #11
    Senior Member Chaotic Harmony's Avatar
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    I'd blame WoW if he was running around killing midgets/dwarves or cows/other animals....

    But seriously... I'm with @Rasofy... WoW is hardly violent. I've seen far worse video games.


  2. #12
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Yeah, like he would never become a killer if he didn't play WoW. Besides, using arguementation such as that, you could as well surmise that playing WoW that much may have delayed his killings but a fair amount of time, and could possibly have prevented it alltogether, if Blizzard did a better job on cataclysm.

    Just saying, games don't breed killers. If you believe they do, then give me one example of a perfectly healthy normal person without outragious ideaologies and beliefs or other forms of psychological issues to become a killer through playign videogames. There are none.

    For your information, just about everyone these days play videogames, so it's easy to assume killers and criminals do so as well.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  3. #13

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    WoW is a symptom, not a cause.
    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwakar View Post
    WoW is a symptom, not a cause.
    I'm not even convinced its a symptom.

    I've heard or read deconstructions of certain sorts of sci fi and fantasy genres suggesting that they are closet fascistic but I'm unconvinced, I think it could be an exaggeration.

    http://flag.blackened.net/liberty/moorcock.html

    Moorcock is supposed to have been a big influence on or cohort of Alan Moore and this piece here certainly is thematically similar to the implicit critique which was Watchmen.

    When I played the old warcraft games, and I've never played WoW, they were about building cities and settlements as much as waging wars, WoW itself I'm lead to believe is a fantasy adventure game like Age of Conan or going a ways back the Fighting Fantasy novels. Those sorts of adventure escapist books are great, I think I wouldnt have taken to reading at all without them and since I'm largely or entirely self-taught by my own reading that's a big deal (I've got a degree, diploma and masters, could work towards a doctorate if I really choose to and at school they'd written me off, had all sorts of explanations including dyslexia and hyperactivity).

    To be honest with the world only set to get more alienating and no prospect of change I'd say people are going to need more avenues of escapism, not less.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    To be honest with the world only set to get more alienating and no prospect of change I'd say people are going to need more avenues of escapism, not less.
    Exactly why it's a symptom. Escapism at it's most convenient, affordable, socially-acceptable and prolific. --Unlike substance abuse.
    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwakar View Post
    Exactly why it's a symptom. Escapism at it's most convenient, affordable, socially-acceptable and prolific. --Unlike substance abuse.
    When I think about it maybe escapism's not good when it borders addictions.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    When I think about it maybe escapism's not good when it borders addictions.
    Yup. I think that's why gaming is more sinister in a sense. In moderate doses it's fine, unlike drugs or something where the danger is real and immediate. People get lulled into a sense of complacency. It becomes particularly hard for them to realize when it's a problem, especially when SO many other people do it. Anything can become an addiction if people use it to keep real life at bay for long enough and it damages relationships and isolates them. Hell, even stamp-collecting could become obsessive. It's about what lies within the individual.
    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

  8. #18
    Senior Member swordpath's Avatar
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    I wouldn't say WoW is the culprit, but probably the isolation instead.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwakar View Post
    Yup. I think that's why gaming is more sinister in a sense. In moderate doses it's fine, unlike drugs or something where the danger is real and immediate. People get lulled into a sense of complacency. It becomes particularly hard for them to realize when it's a problem, especially when SO many other people do it. Anything can become an addiction if people use it to keep real life at bay for long enough and it damages relationships and isolates them. Hell, even stamp-collecting could become obsessive. It's about what lies within the individual.
    Perhaps, although industries have been tapping to the minute innovative psychological researh on habit forming behaviour from the first emergence of marketing and ad men, books like The Hidden Persuaders appear naive in the warnings they made and predictions they made but we're away beyond that now.

    Mind you would have seen a time when people debated the amount of them they spent watching TV, we're away beyond that too.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by swordpath View Post
    I wouldn't say WoW is the culprit, but probably the isolation instead.
    That's what I'm saying. WoW isn't the cause. The man has issues. He used WoW as a way to isolate himself. A person could do it with a lot of things. It's just that WoW doesn't send up warning flags unlike other activities.
    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

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