User Tag List

First 8910111220 Last

Results 91 to 100 of 297

  1. #91
    . Blank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6
    Posts
    1,202

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    Let this thread stand as a challenge to all the smartest of you on the other side to come up with a better vision for the future (that's realistic and not possible only in some idealistic fever dream
    What the fuck? You're asking us to answer a completely abstract question with an abstract answer in such a way that it will never run into any concrete, real-world problems? Why don't you try answering this yourself? Oh wait...

    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit
    Our current problems are so massive that I couldn't even begin to speculate about what such a balance [between individual growth and economic protection] might look like.
    You just want to criticize others with no accountability, I take it. There are solutions to the questions of how effectively a government can be run; however, the loudest claims against them stem from societal issues. i.e. You can make a perfect government on paper that would never work in real life.
    Ti = 19 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Te = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Ne = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Fi = 15 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Si = 12 [][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Ni = 12 [][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Se = 11[][][][][][][][][][][]
    Fe = 0

    -----------------
    Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly;
    Man got to sit and wonder why, why, why;
    Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land;
    Man got to tell himself he understand

  2. #92
    Tempbanned
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    14,031

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blank View Post
    What the fuck? You're asking us to answer a completely abstract question with an abstract answer in such a way that it will never run into any concrete, real-world problems? Why don't you try answering this yourself? Oh wait...



    You just want to criticize others with no accountability, I take it. There are solutions to the questions of how effectively a government can be run; however, the loudest claims against them stem from societal issues. i.e. You can make a perfect government on paper that would never work in real life.
    With the first statement I was trying to limit appeals to shit that doesn't fit with reality, I'm sorry if you think I purposely created an impossible to answer question, but I've been doing my best to answer it the whole time. In fact the first article I posted does a pretty good job.

  3. #93
    . Blank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6
    Posts
    1,202

    Default

    @DiscoBiscuit There's a fundamental problem with the premise that capitalism and patriotism are compatible. They aren't. If you call yourself a capitalist, you shouldn't call yourself a patriot and vice versa. Capitalism has no nationality. It is loyal to no country. Capital will be produced as cheaply as it can in any nation it can. It's about time people realized this.

    Some would argue that issuing tariffs on foreign goods and penalizing companies for outsourcing could solve a lot of problems. It could. But it's completely unrealistic due to the shitstorm it would cause in the political landscape. Not to mention that tariffs offset the hand of the free market; something which goes against capitalism.




    I personally think that either the goal of capitalism (to produce as many goods as cheaply as required) or the need for patriotism needs to be re-evaluated before any serious framework adjustments can be made.
    Ti = 19 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Te = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Ne = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Fi = 15 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Si = 12 [][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Ni = 12 [][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Se = 11[][][][][][][][][][][]
    Fe = 0

    -----------------
    Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly;
    Man got to sit and wonder why, why, why;
    Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land;
    Man got to tell himself he understand

  4. #94
    . Blank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6
    Posts
    1,202

    Default

    @DiscoBiscuit @Lateralus

    Germany sets new solar power record, institute says

    http://uk.reuters.com/article/2012/0...84P0FI20120526
    German solar power plants produced a world record 22 gigawatts of electricity per hour - equal to 20 nuclear power stations at full capacity - through the midday hours on Friday and Saturday, the head of a renewable energy think tank said.
    Ti = 19 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Te = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Ne = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Fi = 15 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Si = 12 [][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Ni = 12 [][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Se = 11[][][][][][][][][][][]
    Fe = 0

    -----------------
    Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly;
    Man got to sit and wonder why, why, why;
    Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land;
    Man got to tell himself he understand

  5. #95
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    548 sp/sx
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    3,438

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blank View Post
    @DiscoBiscuit There's a fundamental problem with the premise that capitalism and patriotism are compatible. They aren't. If you call yourself a capitalist, you shouldn't call yourself a patriot and vice versa. Capitalism has no nationality. It is loyal to no country. Capital will be produced as cheaply as it can in any nation it can. It's about time people realized this.

    Some would argue that issuing tariffs on foreign goods and penalizing companies for outsourcing could solve a lot of problems. It could. But it's completely unrealistic due to the shitstorm it would cause in the political landscape. Not to mention that tariffs offset the hand of the free market; something which goes against capitalism.

    I personally think that either the goal of capitalism (to produce as many goods as cheaply as required) or the need for patriotism needs to be re-evaluated before any serious framework adjustments can be made.
    Excellent points! Again, many conservatives are operating off of a patriotic premise; but one that assumes capitalism represents the best interests of the nation, because they see it as following “the principles” of the founders. (I think my last post included a link to an article showing that corporations weren't even what the founders envisioned in the Constitution).
    So they cannot address the fact that these corporations and executives are taking money out of the country, or sitting on it somewhere. They have to blame this all on taxes and
    “handouts” to the “undeserving”.

    As for Romney, wasn't he the one the other GOP candidates/supporters claimed was the most like the liberal Dems? (Big govt. etc). If he gets in, will conservatives eventually begin
    decrying him as another Bush, RINO, virtual Democrat/liberal etc. once the “gone 2012” euphoria wears off (and things haven't magically gotten any better)?

    I do like what Discobiscuit has been saying about corporations being out of control, however. But is Romney going to try to do something about it, or will he take the standard “just give them more and blame the poor” approach?
    APS Profile: Inclusion: e/w=1/6 (Supine) |Control: e/w=7/3 (Choleric) |Affection: e/w=1/9 (Supine)
    Ti 54.3 | Ne 47.3 | Si 37.8 | Fe 17.7 | Te 22.5 | Ni 13.4 | Se 18.9 | Fi 27.9

    Temperament (APS) from scratch -- MBTI Type from scratch
    Type Ideas

  6. #96
    meh Salomé's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    10,540

    Default

    I expect this has already been posted, but seems apt.

    Research suggests that conservatives are, on average, more susceptible to fear than those who identify themselves as liberals. Looking at MRIs of a large sample of young adults last year, researchers at University College London discovered that “greater conservatism was associated with increased volume of the right amygdala”. The amygdala is an ancient brain structure that's activated during states of fear and anxiety. (The researchers also found that “greater liberalism was associated with increased gray matter volume in the anterior cingulate cortex” – a region in the brain that is believed to help people manage complexity.)

    That has implications for our political world. In a recent interview, Chris Mooney, author of The Republican Brain, explained, “The amygdala plays the same role in every species that has an amygdala. It basically takes over to save your life. It does other things too, but in a situation of threat, you cease to process information rationally and you're moving automatically to protect yourself.”
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  7. #97
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    Yeah, I just read the Republican Brain...pretty interesting and relevant to typology, too!
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  8. #98
    Tempbanned
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    14,031

    Default

    I've been in the hospital with a blown out leg all week.

    I'll address your statements when I have the energy to spare.

  9. #99
    Tempbanned
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    14,031

    Default

    From the Economist:

    Shale of the century

    The “golden age of gas” could be cleaner than greens think

    AMERICA’S “unconventional” gas boom continues to amaze. Between 2005 and 2010 the country’s shale-gas industry, which produces natural gas from shale rock by bombarding it with water and chemicals—a technique known as hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”—grew by 45% a year. As a proportion of America’s overall gas production shale gas has increased from 4% in 2005 to 24% today. America produces more gas than it knows what to do with. Its storage facilities are rapidly filling, and its gas price (prices for gas, unlike oil, are set regionally) has collapsed. Last month it dipped below $2 per million British thermal units (mBtu): less than a sixth of the pre-boom price and too low for producers to break even.

    Those are problems most European and Asian countries, which respectively pay roughly four and six times more for their gas, would relish. America’s gas boom confers a huge economic advantage. It has created hundreds of thousands of jobs, directly and indirectly. And it has rejuvenated several industries, including petrochemicals, where ethane produced from natural gas is a feedstock.

    The gas price is likely to rise in the next few years, because of increasing demand. Peter Voser, the boss of Royal Dutch Shell, an oil firm with big shale-gas investments, expects it to double by 2015. Yet it will remain below European and Asian prices, so the industry should still grow. America is estimated to have enough gas to sustain its current production rate for over a century.

    This is astonishing. Barely five years ago America was expected to be a big gas importer. Between 2000 and 2010 it built infrastructure to regasify over 100 billion cubic metres (bcm) of imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Yet in 2011 American LNG imports were less than 20 bcm. Efforts are now under way to convert idle regasification terminals into liquefaction facilities, in order to export LNG. Plans for a terminal in Sabine Pass, Louisiana, are expected to be approved in June.

    The shock waves of America’s gas boom are being felt elsewhere. Development of Russia’s vast Shtokman gasfield, in the Barents Sea—a $40 billion project which was intended to supply America with LNG—has stalled. Qatari LNG, once earmarked for America, is going to energy-starved Japan. Yet a bigger change is expected, with large-scale shale-gas production possible in China, Australia, Argentina and several European countries, including Poland and Ukraine.


    Last year the International Energy Agency released a boosterish report entitled “Are we entering a golden age of gas?” On May 29th it released a follow-up, from which it dropped the question-mark. It foresees a tripling in the supply of unconventional gas between 2010 and 2035, leading to a slower price rise than would otherwise be expected. It expects this to boost global demand by more than 50%.
    Free to frack in America

    Not everyone is so bullish. America’s shale-gas boom was fuelled by a coincidence of factors: “open access” pipeline regulation, which inspired wildcat exploration; abundant drill-rigs and other infrastructure; and strong property rights, whereby landowners own the rights to minerals beneath their holdings. Few of these conditions exist elsewhere.

    Europe has a good pipeline network, which in theory is open to all. Yet the pipes get tied up years in advance. European landowners typically do not own the minerals under their land, so they have little incentive to encourage exploration. Also, Europe is crowded, so its NIMBYs are noisy.

    China has a different sort of problem: a shortage of water, of which millions of gallons can be required to frack a single well. The Argentine government’s recent decision to grab control of the country’s largest oil firm, YPF, will scare off the foreign investment its shale industry needs.

    Such hurdles will make the pace, and perhaps scale, of America’s boom hard to equal. And even a big increase in supply might not bring down the European gas price much. Unlike the price in America, it is tied to the oil price, thanks to long-term Russian and Norwegian export contracts.

    Shale-gas producers also face opposition from greens, who object to the industry’s heavy water usage and a small risk that fracking could lead to contamination of aquifers and even to earthquakes. There is also a risk that large amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, could escape during shale-gas exploration and production. The IEA estimates that shale-gas production emits 3.5% more than conventional gas, and 12% when it involves venting excess gas. France and Bulgaria have banned fracking; American and Australian anti-frackers are also rallying.

    The greens have a case, but they exaggerate it. So long as well-shafts are properly sealed, there is hardly any risk that fracking will poison groundwater. By eliminating venting, methane emissions can be kept to an acceptable minimum. And the risk of earthquakes, which has long been present in conventional oil-and-gas extraction, is modest and mitigated by monitoring. The IEA says such precautions would add 7% to the cost of a shale-gas well—a small price for a healthy industry.

    But they would not address the big problem with shale gas and all fossil fuels: the global warming they cause. Without a serious effort to boost renewable energy and other low-carbon technologies, the IEA envisages warming of over 3.5°C. That could be unaffordable.

  10. #100
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    XXFP
    Posts
    2,706

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    I expect this has already been posted, but seems apt.
    Research suggests that conservatives are, on average, more susceptible to fear than those who identify themselves as liberals. Looking at MRIs of a large sample of young adults last year, researchers at University College London discovered that “greater conservatism was associated with increased volume of the right amygdala”. The amygdala is an ancient brain structure that's activated during states of fear and anxiety. (The researchers also found that “greater liberalism was associated with increased gray matter volume in the anterior cingulate cortex” – a region in the brain that is believed to help people manage complexity.)

    That has implications for our political world. In a recent interview, Chris Mooney, author of The Republican Brain, explained, “The amygdala plays the same role in every species that has an amygdala. It basically takes over to save your life. It does other things too, but in a situation of threat, you cease to process information rationally and you're moving automatically to protect yourself.”
    Quote Originally Posted by Orangey View Post
    Yeah, I just read the Republican Brain...pretty interesting and relevant to typology, too!
    i think this is interesting...new thread here. (link pending)
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

Similar Threads

  1. The meaning of the answer to "what makes you special"? [Functions]
    By kangaroo2003 in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 07-19-2015, 05:10 PM
  2. Hypothetical Question: The Answer to Violent Psychopathy
    By Passacaglia in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-02-2015, 01:35 AM
  3. [Other] What is the absolute answer to everything?
    By The Wailing Specter in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 103
    Last Post: 12-29-2013, 01:25 AM
  4. Which questions on personality tests do you find the most difficult to answer?
    By Such Irony in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-11-2010, 08:03 AM
  5. The Ultimate Answer to Life, The Universe, and Everything Test
    By Phantonym in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 03-28-2010, 09:37 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO