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  1. #31
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swordpath View Post
    He did.
    That's not the same as "turning a blind eye".
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  2. #32
    Senior Member swordpath's Avatar
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    Apparently Obama thought it necessary to show some support:

    http://articles.cnn.com/2011-10-14/a...source=message

  3. #33
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Hmm.. interesting reponse from Wil Wheaton, something about the KONY 2012 organization being not so reputable.

    http://wilwheaton.tumblr.com/post/18...stly-wanted-to

  4. #34
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    Some good material is already being produced as a result of this.

    Anyway, it's not going to work, no matter how many armchair activists spend 10 minutes caring.






  5. #35
    ndovjtjcaqidthi
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  6. #36
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    Their knowledge of African politics is naive at best, disastrous at worst.

    Despite this being the flavor of the week for the West, such attention is much more significant in an African context. The repercussions of this will be mostly felt by Africans in Africa.

    If they really wanted to help they would have sought those Africans willing and able to asses the situation much more appropriately. We do exist...and believe it or not we've been aware of the situation for a long time now. (Ironically, it's not even the biggest humanitarian issue in the region...I'd say the killing of albinos due to the belief that they have super natural attributes and the slaughtering and eating of pygmy tribes trumps this, but thats just me..)

    And believe it or not, the governments in place do have plans. In Africa it's a lot more complicated than just swooping in and killing the guy...it's a much more delicate process because the climate this takes place in is a lot more volatile...people's alliances run deep. It doesn't take much.

    So, yeah, thanks America for making our jobs much more difficult.

  7. #37
    Member Grizzly On The Loose's Avatar
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    It's sad n' all, but this whole story appears to be nothing but another guilt trip to get the masses to accept another dubious military intervention with the purpose of filling the fat cats' pockets.
    ENTJ 5w6 so/sp SLE

  8. #38
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usehername View Post
    Your friend is going through the normal stages of reverse-culture shock that appears when people come back to the Western world after spending a year hands-on helping in a developing country, which lots of people have done (myself included).

    Inevitably, these people's opinions filter out into the same ratios as the general Western population that hasn't seen with their own eyes, though perhaps your friend, like me and others who have lived there, take our stances with a more informed opinion.

    Foreign aid to Africa is a completely different complex system than a dude committing atrocities that affect children. Don't get too existential about it. Sometimes the easy answer is the easy answer.
    I appreciate that you and other caring individuals make the effort to go over there. Despite a desire to help I have only been on a short-term trip to a developing country, but never had the balls to go and live in one of those countries.

    What's the easy answer?

    Foreign aid is totally wrapped up in military interaction and must be part of the analysis of intervention.

    Even if we don't consider foreign aid going after Kony raises all sorts of difficult questions.

    How many child soldiers are we willing to kill to get to him?
    Does the US go it alone?
    If we arm and train the Ugandans can we trust that they won't botch it like they have in other attempts on Koney's life?
    If the Ugandans botch it can we expect a retaliatory killing spree?
    Is it worst if we are able able to adequately train and arm Ugandans only to see them use that training in the future to rape and kill innocents?
    If the US goes it alone how does the US justify putting our men and women in danger to kill someone who is not a threat to the US?
    Is it justifiable to avoid risking American lives by bombing, but killing innocents in the process?
    How do we justify killing a man who isn't even a major current threat to the Uganda people since he has been inactive since 2006?
    If he is inactive is it a bigger threat if we loose his soldiers from his control only to join a more destructive force?
    Do we kill him?
    Do we try to capture him and have him tried by the International Criminal Court?

    There are plenty of practical questions that do not have easy answers.

    I also don't think the more existential questions should be ignored.

    If this is about justice does it make sense to aid murders and rapists in the ugandan army to arrest or kill a worst murderer and rapist?
    Do millions of facebookers pushing for the U.S. to do "something" actually push us towards a mutually beneficial foreign policy toward Uganda?
    Is it actually more scary if our government responds to Facebook's cry for blood?
    If Facebook can be whipped into a frenzy with snazzy marketing and propaganda to demand the blood of an evil man can they be whipped into a frenzy to demand the blood of an innocent man?
    Once we have Kony's life should we be surprised if most of Facebook forgets about Uganda in the aftermath while Uganda continues to struggle?
    What does Invisible children stand to gain from this campaign?
    If they gain large donations can they be expected to spend it wisely?
    Is it a good idea for non-profits to pick sides in developing countries where all sides have blood on their hands?
    Is is it a good idea for non-profits with limited access to military intelligence to advocate for military intervention in any situation?
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  9. #39
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Couldn't we just send a drone after him? Or maybe an invisible Seal Team Six, once that technology is developed?
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  10. #40
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    This has been spreading like wildfire. I go to a public university in the states and it seems everyone I know has something to say about it. I watched the video last night and this morning again and although it is for a good cause, which I think everyone would naturally support, I disagree with the way that Invisible Children is going about doing this: providing little information and a lot of glitter. This ultimately targets young people who want to belong - like college students.

    The guy who made the movie should have kept it more succinct and more alarming. This guy is pretty good at manipulation and instilling "inspiration" which is where he is getting his followers: they want to be apart of the next big movement! They just don't know entirely what it's about, and most likely won't go out of their way to find out.

    Overall it was corny, too long, and I didn't appreciate how this guy tried to manipulate us into joining this "revolution".

    Oh, and the parallels to V's speech in V for Vendetta when he broadcasts to the world on tv in the beginning are so subtle....
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

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