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  1. #1
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Default Structural Violence

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.N.V.S.SURYANARAYANA et al
    Structural violence is a term first used in the 1960s commonly ascribed to John Galtung. It refers to a form of violence based on the systematic ways in which a given social structure or social institution "kills people" by preventing them from meeting their basic needs. Institutionalized elitism, ethnocentrism, classism, racism, sexism, adultism, nationalism, heterosexism and ageism are just some examples of structural violence. Life spans are reduced when people are socially dominated, politically oppressed, or economically exploited. Structural violence and direct violence are highly interdependent. Structural violence inevitably produces conflict and often direct violence, including family violence, racial violence, hate crimes, terrorism, genocide, and war.

    Structural violence, however, is almost always invisible, embedded in ubiquitous social structures, normalized by stable institutions and regular experience. Structural violence occurs whenever people are disadvantaged by political, legal, economic, or cultural traditions. But structural violence produces suffering and death as often as direct violence does, though damage is slower, more subtle, more common, and more difficult to repair. Structural violence is problematic in and of itself, but it is also dangerous because frequently leads to direct violence. The chronically oppressed are often, for logical the world is easily traced to structured inequalities.
    People in power have the most capacity to influence these structures, although when exploitative structures exist there is responsibility shared between everyone who participates at various levels. People at all economic levels can participate in reinforcing these structures, but exploitation requires both the willingness/intent and the power to enact. This is why individuals in a greater position of power have more responsibility and are capable of a greater degree of guilt.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member FunnyDigestion's Avatar
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    Television is the biggest source of self-loathing in modern society. People want to be like the people they see on TV, which means if you're poor, fat, ugly, or a member of any sort of distasteful subculture, you'd better start hating yourself because you'll never be on TV unless it's to be ridiculed.

    I want to kick Jerry Springer in the nuts.
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    "Man is free, but his freedom ceases when he has no faith in it."

  3. #3
    Senior Member reason's Avatar
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    So it's a nothing concept, like whats-his-face was suggesting in the other thread. I mean, almost anything could be spun as 'structural violence'. It's really just shorthand for 'policies that I think do more harm than good'. This kind of hand-wavy rhetoric about structural violence is actually the worst kind of structural violence possible, in my opinion ... see what I did there?
    A criticism that can be brought against everything ought not to be brought against anything.

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    This is a very real thing, this structural violence; I've seen it everywhere, it permeates almost every corner of society and is a bane to many. To combat it however, to end the existence of structual violence completely (or to at least limit as much as possible) requires reforms on a grand scale; entire institutions and ways of life need to be changed in order to accomodate peace and fairness. Yes, those in power may be able to do more, but if they lack the will to do so then placing trust in them is not an option.

    Quote Originally Posted by reason View Post
    So it's a nothing concept, like whats-his-face was suggesting in the other thread. I mean, almost anything could be spun as 'structural violence'. It's really just shorthand for 'policies that I think do more harm than good'.
    Given that it's clearly defined as "a form of violence based on the systematic ways in which a given social structure or social institution "kills people" by preventing them from meeting their basic needs", I would say no, it's not a 'nothing concept' nor can it be shorthand for anything.

    This kind of hand-wavy rhetoric about structural violence is actually the worst kind of structural violence possible, in my opinion ... see what I did there?
    Rhetoric concerning socital theories and your opinions though, don't cause harm of violence of any sort. See what I did there?

  5. #5
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by fia View Post
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    People in power have the most capacity to influence these structures, although when exploitative structures exist there is responsibility shared between everyone who participates at various levels. People at all economic levels can participate in reinforcing these structures, but exploitation requires both the willingness/intent and the power to enact. This is why individuals in a greater position of power have more responsibility and are capable of a greater degree of guilt.
    There is a difference between willingness to commit an action that harms others and willingness to commit an action to harm others. The latter is always, by this articles definition, structural violence, while the former isn't always. Confusing the two could leave one to believe that any deliberate acquisition of power, in a system with finite power and other people, is a deliberate attempt to harm others.

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    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    As important as I think structures are I think that the personal and cultural are just as important. They are all interconnected closely but I think that with the correct combination of personal and cultural norms some individuals and families are more able to cope with structural inequality.

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    meh Salomé's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reason View Post
    So it's a nothing concept, like whats-his-face was suggesting in the other thread. I mean, almost anything could be spun as 'structural violence'. It's really just shorthand for 'policies that I think do more harm than good'. This kind of hand-wavy rhetoric about structural violence is actually the worst kind of structural violence possible, in my opinion ... see what I did there?
    I'm torn between this response and the more NF-y one.

    I really despise hysterical outpourings of emotive language. At the same time, sometimes we need something a bit more extreme to jolt us out of our complacency regarding the status quo.

    But "adultism"? WTF? I just googled it and ended up somewhere I did not want to be...
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  8. #8
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    Actually, this remindsme of the concept of epistemic violence which I believe has actual physical effects on neurological structure that influence synaptic pain response at times indistinguishable from physical brute force. Again why I have no compunctions on excercising force when elistemically challenged. For those squeamish about physical violence I mean force in an abstract almost newtonian way "that which channels action" which I feel is a language unto itself

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