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  1. #121
    Lallygag Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    My English father said to a Canadian last week that he had no money when in the RAF as he spent it all on fags.

    I had to explain that fags = cigarettes, or the conversation was going downhill real quick

  2. #122
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    The best slang is secretive to a small group. Therefore, I can't share mine.

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    At lunch today, I said to someone that they were eating a very "diddy" bar of chocolate. To me, "diddy" means something small.. to the Irish lady I was talking to, it's slang for a breast.

    Whoops!
    Yes, diddy is slang for a breast in Scotland too...

    Around Glasgow, people say "Am ur" which means "I am"... Total confusion for foreigners! As best as I can tell, it's a contraction of the meaningless "I am are".

    The opposite is "Am urny"!

  4. #124
    Senior Member kuranes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart View Post
    Yes, diddy is slang for a breast in Scotland too...
    Someone ( Geoff ? ) earlier said that they thought "diddy' meant "small", but I always thought that was actually "diddly".

    The word "get" can mean a lot of things.
    ( 1. ) "Did you get that ?" ( understand )
    ( 2. ) " I'm going to get you." ( attack )
    ( 3. ) "I'd love to get some" ( own or buy )
    ( 4. ) "Curse Sir Walter Raleigh.."
    etc.

    I enjoy antique slang. Eric Partridge's books have info on that.

    "hip" now seems to mean "popular", whereas before it referred more to "insider" knowledge or attitude.

    "cool" can mean a variety of things.
    ( 1. ) "Well, he actually seemed rather cool towards the idea when I spoke to him." ( unafavorable or aloof )
    ( 2. ) "Oh, man, that's so cool." ( great )
    ( 3. ) "Cool out, man" ( chill - also slang )

    I remember when an artist I know spoke to me of the differences between "cool" actors and "warm" actors. Henry Fonda was described as an example of a "cool" actor. I think Jimmy Stewart was described as "warm". Kubrick was a "cool" director.

    In Art, the "cool" colors are usually your greens and blues.

    Using the word "your" like I just did is an expression that not everyone uses, either.

    Chicago expression - "We're going out to the store. Do you want to come with ? " ( Leaving off the "us". )

    Cincinnati expression - "Please?" ( "What ? " )
    "The people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them that they are being attacked and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism, and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    Reichsfuhrer Herman Goering at the Nuremburg trials.

  5. #125
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuranes View Post
    Chicago expression - "We're going out to the store. Do you want to come with ? " ( Leaving off the "us". )
    That one isn't specific to Chicago.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  6. #126
    Senior Member kuranes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    That one isn't specific to Chicago.
    Someone had told me that it was . I never heard it in Ohio, where I came from originally. Anyway, it's slang, or a quirky expression.
    "The people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them that they are being attacked and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism, and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    Reichsfuhrer Herman Goering at the Nuremburg trials.

  7. #127
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    When my friend comes down from Alberta, he awlays puts "the" in front of the freeways...and I laugh at him! Here we just say "I-5" or "I-84," or sometimes just the number. :p

    My Mom being from the south, I have a tendency to slip "y'all" into my conversations from time to time...:p

    The lady who lived next to me while I was growing up was from Minesota...she always says front room and davenport. While my grandma from the south always would use divan to refer to the couch. :p

    Oh, and Ice Box for refrigerator - thanks, Mom! :p lol

  8. #128
    Senior Member kuranes's Avatar
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    We have a supermarket chain called "Jewel" that some people put "the" in front of. It's like a rock star with only one name; an "institution".
    "The people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them that they are being attacked and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism, and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    Reichsfuhrer Herman Goering at the Nuremburg trials.

  9. #129
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Everyone says "fuckin A" in upstate New York. This phrase might just be popular everywhere though. We also copy Boston here and say "wicked" a lot.

    A slang word unique to my town: "Grit" was popular derogatory term aimed at poorer people/hicks and also sketchy/shady people. It's phased out though.

  10. #130
    Lallygag Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuranes View Post
    Someone ( Geoff ? ) earlier said that they thought "diddy' meant "small", but I always thought that was actually "diddly".


    Chicago expression - "We're going out to the store. Do you want to come with ? " ( Leaving off the "us". )
    Just local to here, we get both diddy and diddly for small. Diddy may even be a slang contraction of diddly.

    I hear "come with" quite a lot around North America. It's very prevalent in eastern Canada, for example, and I've sure I've heard it lots of other places. Never in the UK though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Midget View Post
    When my friend comes down from Alberta, he awlays puts "the" in front of the freeways...and I laugh at him! Here we just say "I-5" or "I-84," or sometimes just the number. :p

    The question is, why do you laugh at him? Would you sail down River Thames or THE River Thames? Would you sail Atlantic Ocean or sail THE Atlantic Ocean. So.. why drive I-5 rather than THE I-5

    (yeah, I'm teasing, but it's not an illogical language construct)

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