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  1. #21
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphosis View Post
    Bread and Circuses.

    It's not a lack of economics knowledge that creates a massive debt. The politicians' career is hostage to the will of a people that only care about themselves.
    So you're saying that Bush was an innocent dupe of those mean, nasty people who made him get involved in Iraq which costed the American taxpayers a couple of trillion, give or take a couple hundred billion? How about Fannie and Freddie? I guess Bush had no knowledge of anything, poor innocent little mite, held at gunpoint.

    Or let's look at this another way. Bush would have probably failed both those degrees so the debt might still be around $6 - 7 trillion.

  2. #22
    FigerPuppet
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    Do you mean requirements as in laws that prohibit someone from becoming president, or do you mean the personal requirements we as voting citizens have for the candidates? In a democracy there should be NONE of the former. If the people want an 18-year old, they should be able to choose one. If they want a Canadian citizen as president, they should be able to vote for one who is in the elections. The current rules that apply to an American presidential candidate - such as having to have been born on US soil - are ancient, completely ridiculous and unnecessary.
    Also, people suggesting that a presidential candidate should hold at least one academic degree are hugely undemocratic. Your beloved founding fathers - rebel scum that they were - would roll around in their graves.

    As for the latter, I cannot stand career politicians who do not hold true to their supposed beliefs and call selling out "compromising". Therefore, in an attempt to flush out these fools, a politician's wage should not be large enough to qualify for top bracket taxation, because it is a position that shouldn't be wanted for the good dough it can bring in, nor the prestige, but rather for an opportunity to influence the direction of the nation toward the ideology you believe in. I have yet to come up with a way to make it a humbling position - maybe force politicians to not wear any dedorant or cologne when they attend parliamentary sessions.
    To summarize, being a politician should be a shit-job that one would only wish to do out of a sense of duty.

  3. #23
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Although the idea is fascinating, I don't know what good requirements would be. College degrees do not necessarily mean that you are smarter, more qualified, or even wiser or more knowledgeable. But then, what does? Age? Not necessarily. Background? Not really. Experience? What kind? And does that mean that someone who is new can't have good ideas or be a natural leader?

    But, yes, I think it is generally ridiculous that we have a precedent of having actors as politicians. I also think it's ridiculous that an ape drooling at the mouth got a B.A. at Yale and an MBA at Harvard and went on to become a rich oil entrepreneur and later become president of the United States.
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catbert View Post
    Should there be certain requirements or other limitations before one can qualify to become a politician?

    Should they pass some sort of IQ threshold?
    Be able to posses a certain amount of knowledge in a particular area? (particularly if they are to become a minister)
    Knowledge of statistics and other data interpretation methods?
    Other requirements?
    Absolutely not, I think that office should be open to anyone, anytime, anyplace. Although I believe in a more robust democratic concept, based more on popular sovereignty than representation and referendum, something beginning in the workplace and ending at home.

  5. #25
    The Eighth Colour Octarine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Although I believe in a more robust democratic concept, based more on popular sovereignty than representation and referendum, something beginning in the workplace and ending at home.
    Do you want to explain this in more detail?

  6. #26
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    All politicians seek to maximise power.

    However liberal democracy seeks to limit power.

    So liberal democracy is an act of unparallelled genius. Liberal democracy is entirely counter-intuitive, in the face of politicians who intuitively seek to maximise their power.

    And as the proof of the pudding is in the eating, liberal democracy works.

    Of course there are dummies who sought to replace liberal democracy with fascism and communism, but thank heavens they failed. And today Islam seeks to replace liberal democracy with Sharia.

    But perhaps the greatest sadness is that those who benefit from liberal democracy neither understand it nor appreciate it.

  7. #27
    Per Ardua Metamorphosis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    So you're saying that Bush was an innocent dupe of those mean, nasty people who made him get involved in Iraq which costed the American taxpayers a couple of trillion, give or take a couple hundred billion? How about Fannie and Freddie? I guess Bush had no knowledge of anything, poor innocent little mite, held at gunpoint.

    Or let's look at this another way. Bush would have probably failed both those degrees so the debt might still be around $6 - 7 trillion.
    All of the sarcasm doesn't help your post get taken seriously and makes it seem more like a political rant than a real response to the quoted portion. Regardless, the President doesn't create or pass the budget and you can't go to war without funding. Furthermore, the Executive Branch does exercise some regulation of commerce, but that's why their are agencies full of people with degrees in economics and business and the President has advisers. Realistically, having a BS in economics isn't going to give someone the needed amount of education and understanding to make sweeping decisions on national fiscal policy and regulations on major financial institutions.

    A whole lot of people bitch about the War in Iraq but there were a lot less people doing so when it kicked off. Hindsight is 20/20.
    "You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit."

    Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office
    than to serve and obey them. - David Hume

  8. #28
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    As someone who isn't as emiotionally vested in American politics as some, I must say that all the Bush bashing is laughable. He is smarter than people believe. If you think becoming the leader of the west is in anyway acheivable without at least considerable intelligence, then you are mistaken. Granted he did have social factors in his favour, still he is one of many to have these social factors..yet he was one of the few to actually actualize his potential. That is as good a meaure of intelligence as any, and by my estimation better than most.

    What Bush lacked in Academic smarts (probably nothing, he was probably smart enough to realize academia is deeply flawed and therefore never really tried beyond the minimum), he more than made up in Social smarts. People continuously bash the intelligence of their political leaders without realizing that their leaders are a reflection of them, and leading a country with such deeply devided interest would make even a genius look like a "drooling ape".

    Einstein was offered the position of president (of Israel, I believe) and he turned it down claiming it was too hard a job. There is a reason why the Einsteins of the world concentrate on physical, tangible activities...the Einsteins of the world know they arent smart enough to solve everyones issues

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catbert View Post
    Do you want to explain this in more detail?
    I believe things like job rotation in the work place, balanced job complexes, which involves job rotation but also has more equalisations of responsibility and remuneration, and other mechanisms aimed at preventing managerialism, such as rotation of the managerial role within teams or offices.

    I also believe in something similar being applied to public offices, although not necessarily political representation, the filling of juries by electoral role lottery is one example of how I think public offices should be filled, it would require a great deal of adjustment since politics itself has become a profession, mainly engaging in managerialism and PR for the richest one percent of society.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    Minimum educational requirements that necessitate both:
    • A BA in Economics.
    • A BA in Law with a focus on Constitutional Law.

    Too many politicians are illiterate, as it relates to both fields.
    Consider, that Barak Obama is illiterate in the US Constitution, yet he is a "constitutional lawyer".

    Also, consider that the brightest minds have no degree.

    In addition, requiring a degree is unconstitutional.

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