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  1. #31
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    I'm just at a loss as to why he thinks the South will be impacted any worse than any other major area - if anything, it will be the major cities in urban areas that are more affected by changing of fuel sources. I'm also not sure what he thinks oil has to do with the South, unless he's specifically referring to Texas, which is super strange since Texas is only like 1/16 of the south, and it doesn't even count as the "southeast" it's actually approximately THE SOUTH...hardly east or west, though some parts, the dry parts, seem SouthWest.

    I think it's absurd that he thinks that what happened in New Orleans happens all the time, too, as it was totally fine for around 300 years before Katrina hit...that's right, I said THREE HUNDRED YEARS. The city was founded in the early 1700's...three hundred years without Katrina...plus, as I've already mentioned we KNOW that New Orleans is under sea level, so it's a higher risk area than many other places in the south. New Orleans is really just a small part of the south, and it's not even the biggest city in the southeastern U.S. - Atlanta, GA gets that title. Note that Georgia is a landlocked state. So is WV, where the coal comes from, just in case he didn't read that before.

    Tornados hit the MidWest and earthquakes hit the West coast. I'm really not sure why Antisocial One picked this particular area, but I'm guessing it has to do with things he's read about that he's blown out of proportion in his mind.

    It's like saying that all of Russia is Chernobyl, that's how absurd it is, truly.

    I think Tinker is correct on the "alarmist" title...sounds like a paranoid INTJ conspiracy theory to me...and the problem being is that it's not founded in reality really at all, as we keep pointing out, his view of the South is pretty warped and inaccurate as far as geography is concerned.

  2. #32
    Senior Member BAJ's Avatar
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    I still don't get what he's talking about.

    Glass production?

    If your window breaks, then you just go to home depot, Lowe's or some other store with windows. They have dozens of windows to choose. Just pick one you like, and take it home and install it. What's the problem?

  3. #33
    As Long As It Takes.... Redbone's Avatar
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    He is referring to the distant (perhaps not so distant) future. Nor does it seem very alarmist to me. Just a natural consequence of what happens when the oil we rely on so much is gone.

    The absence of fossil fuels to easily transport materials, people to rebuild, import food to replace lost crops, etc., would make things very difficult.

    I don't think it will make the southeast uninhabitable but things will be more like they were 100+ years ago.

  4. #34
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    I still think it takes a lot more oil for major cities to function. If anything, people in agricultural based societies who have greater access to things like coastal wind power, et al, will certainly have the means to survive. That's why "uninhabitable" is so much of an overstatement - even in some nightmare future dystopia scenario, I would think that people in the south would be doing a hell of a lot better than the people stuck in the middle of the desert, or stuck in northern urban wastelands which could no longer be run for industry.

  5. #35
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    Plus you've already got all these people in the South who are still like this. Do not doubt their ability to live off of the land. Shoot, if you're just referring to a future scenario with no more oil, I think my point is made even stronger. People in the South will be doing fantastic compared to some others. The winters aren't as cold in many parts of the South thanks to closer proximity to the equator, et al.

    People died up north in the harsh cold winters. There is a very good reason why industry flourished there. It's because they had to force it to flourish to make the north more livable, not the south...we go back 100 years, I'm moving BACK to the south, not away from it.




  6. #36
    Senior Member BAJ's Avatar
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    I don't see how we would suffer a greater hardship than other areas. Nobody knows exactly what will happen. Vast wars? A global dark age?

    I favor believing that hardship will generate necessity and stimulate creativity, and new forms of energy will be developed.

    However, I think I'll be Okay. I have years of food here. I live in a rural area on a farm. We'd have the problem of having to butcher the animals ourselves, and we'd have to change our lifestyle, but it's not much of a big deal.

    They used to have all sorts of animal driven threshers and harvesters. It might go back to that.

    Why would you be better off again?


    Edit: ha, ha. I wrote this before reading Marm's post just above.

  7. #37
    Senior Member BAJ's Avatar
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    The panhandle pioneer settlement is 8 miles from me, which shows how pioneers survived. It gives classes on blacksmithing, hog butchering, leatherworking, crafts, etc. It has a collection of buildings constructed in the 18th and 19th century (before much electricity).

    When I lived in Mississippi, ironically, there was a similar historical demonstration place, showing how life was like on a pre-Civil War plantation.

    Personally, I like buying my food pre-packaged from the store, but I could (if I were really hungry) kill week's worth of food with my bare hands in a couple of hours.

    Edit:

    I was studying that Pioneer Settlement thing, and you may have scared me enough to go to one of their events...just in case:
    Pioneer Day
    See demonstrations such as cooking, soap making, basket weaving, washing clothes, and so much more from life long ago. 9:00AM - 3:00PM,
    October 15, 2011

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by BAJ View Post
    I don't see how we would suffer a greater hardship than other areas. Nobody knows exactly what will happen. Vast wars? A global dark age?

    I favor believing that hardship will generate necessity and stimulate creativity, and new forms of energy will be developed.

    However, I think I'll be Okay. I have years of food here. I live in a rural area on a farm. We'd have the problem of having to butcher the animals ourselves, and we'd have to change our lifestyle, but it's not much of a big deal.

    They used to have all sorts of animal driven threshers and harvesters. It might go back to that.

    Why would you be better off again?


    Edit: ha, ha. I wrote this before reading Marm's post just above.
    My ENFJ sister has been prepared for the libertarians to destroy what is left of our country for several years now. She does all major household repairs, and we have discussed with my mother buying land where our entire family can live together, and we all have some level of agricultural and/or hunting skills, if you include my aunts, uncles, and cousins as well.

    ENFJ says she wants a piece of property for her family to "lie die and down together, if it comes to that."

    I'm relatively unconcerned about this sort of thing, though I acknowledge how much things would change, and I better stock up on books because there'd be no more Intertardz or movies for quite some time. My grandparents grew all of our own vegetables when I was growing up, and we made our own jam. We also know how to make our own ice cream and alcohol, and other little pleasantries of life.

    D.I.Y. is one of the smartest things you can aspire to if you sincerely believe that the people in our civilization are idiotic enough to keep guzzling up fossil fuels at the pace that they are with no regards to alternative energy or the environment.

    As for hurricanes, well, it would be best not to have a beach house, that's all I've really got to say about that.

  9. #39
    Queen hunter Virtual ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    He is referring to the distant (perhaps not so distant) future. Nor does it seem very alarmist to me. Just a natural consequence of what happens when the oil we rely on so much is gone.

    The absence of fossil fuels to easily transport materials, people to rebuild, import food to replace lost crops, etc., would make things very difficult.

    I don't think it will make the southeast uninhabitable but things will be more like they were 100+ years ago.

    Thank god that at someone get the basic of the idea.



    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    I'm just at a loss as to why he thinks the South will be impacted any worse than any other major area - if anything, it will be the major cities in urban areas that are more affected by changing of fuel sources. I'm also not sure what he thinks oil has to do with the South, unless he's specifically referring to Texas, which is super strange since Texas is only like 1/16 of the south, and it doesn't even count as the "southeast" it's actually approximately THE SOUTH...hardly east or west, though some parts, the dry parts, seem SouthWest.

    I think it's absurd that he thinks that what happened in New Orleans happens all the time, too, as it was totally fine for around 300 years before Katrina hit...that's right, I said THREE HUNDRED YEARS. The city was founded in the early 1700's...three hundred years without Katrina...plus, as I've already mentioned we KNOW that New Orleans is under sea level, so it's a higher risk area than many other places in the south. New Orleans is really just a small part of the south, and it's not even the biggest city in the southeastern U.S. - Atlanta, GA gets that title. Note that Georgia is a landlocked state. So is WV, where the coal comes from, just in case he didn't read that before.

    Tornados hit the MidWest and earthquakes hit the West coast. I'm really not sure why Antisocial One picked this particular area, but I'm guessing it has to do with things he's read about that he's blown out of proportion in his mind.

    It's like saying that all of Russia is Chernobyl, that's how absurd it is, truly.

    I think Tinker is correct on the "alarmist" title...sounds like a paranoid INTJ conspiracy theory to me...and the problem being is that it's not founded in reality really at all, as we keep pointing out, his view of the South is pretty warped and inaccurate as far as geography is concerned.


    I think that I never claimed that other parts of the country will not be hit by this.


    Why I think that the south will be hit hardest ? Because hurricanes and tornados can easily destroy the alternative energy sources since they are fragile. While in other parts it could be much easier to produce a mass amount of electricity/energy.
    Which both rises the quality of life and buys more time to think about more permanent and stabile solution.






























    Everything what I am saying is that I dont understand with which energy and resources you will repair this scale of damage. Because energy sources in the south will look just as the infrastructure on these pictures. Also it does not matter from where you get the oil. The point is that the south and areas with constant tornados need it more than the rest of the country. Which is because clssical alternative energy sources will be useless for the most part since they will be destoyed as well.


    (tip: I have already included Midwest into the equation in the first post since it shares the potential storm problem)



    Ok, I think this is it.
    Now we will just have to wait and see what happens as the oil peaks and drops.

  10. #40
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    You're wrong and I suggest you research the South factually. Shouldn't that appeal to your Te?

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