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  1. #111
    Senior Member MiasmaResonance's Avatar
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    She should have at least gotten aggravated manslaughter. I had a feeling on the last day of testimony, though, that she would be found not guilty. In fact, I told my mother "Watch her pull an O.J."..
    And, tada, it happened.

    I honestly don't think that jury understood the meaning of "beyond reasonable doubt".
    "A spill at the plant increased the phosphates in the lake and produced a scum of algae so thick that the swamp smell filled the air, infiltrating the genteel mansions. Debutantes cried over the misfortune of coming out in a season everyone would remember for its bad smell."

  2. #112
    ThatGirl
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICUP View Post
    The nation is always shocked by criminal cases such as Andrea Yates, a mother of five who methodically drowned all of her children in a bathtub then calmly called police, but mothers killing their children are more common than we might think.

    According to the American Anthropological Association, more than 200 women kill their children in the United States each year. (This does seem like an awful lot, but I wonder if Abortion is included in this number, the rest of the stats are so skewed I wouldn't be surprised if this one is too.)

    Three to five children a day are killed by their parents. (Parents does not equal women again define children.)

    Homicide is one of the leading causes of death of children under age four, yet we continue to "persist with the unrealistic view that this is rare behavior," says Jill Korbin, expert on child abuse, who has studied mothers who killed their children. (Here a neutral fact, "Homicide is the....under age four," is followed, in the same sentence, buy an unrelated quote.)

    We should detach from the idea of universal motherhood as natural and see it as a social response," Nancy Scheper-Hughes, medical anthropologist says. Women in jail reported that no-one believed them when they said they wanted to kill their children. "There's a collective denial even when mothers come right out and say, "I really shouldn't be trusted with my kids." (Still no real support to show it is actually that common. I wouldn't believe it either cause it is rare.)

    A look at the rolls of women who are currently on death row, and the crimes that put them there, shows that women who kill their children are indeed not as rare as we would like to believe. Of the 49 women on death row, 11 killed children: (Children is again very loosely defined here.)

    Patricia Blackmon was 29 years old when she killed her 2-year-old adopted daughter in Dothan, AL in May 1999. (1)

    Kenisha Berry at age 20, covered her 4-day-old son with duct tape resulting in his death. (2)

    Debra Jean Milke was 25 when she killed her 4-year-old son in Arizona in 1989. (3)

    Dora Luz Durenrostro killed her two daughters, age 4 and 9, and her son, age 8, when she was 34 years old in San Jacinto, California in 1994. (4)

    Caro Socorro was 42 years old when she killed her three sons, ages 5, 8 and 11, in Santa Rosa Valley, California in 1999. (5)

    Susan Eubanks murdered her four sons, ages 4, 6, 7 and 14, in San Marcos, California, in 1996 when she was 33. (6)

    Caroline Young was 49 in Haywood, California when she killed her 4-year-old granddaughter and 6-year-old grandson. (Does not count wasn't her children.)

    Robin Lee Row was 35 years old when she killed her husband, her 10-year-old son and her 8-year-old daughter in Boise, Idaho in 1992. (Does not count serial murder is different that killing your children alone.)

    Michelle Sue Tharp was 29 years old in Burgettstown, Pennsylvania when she killed her 7-year-old daughter. (7)

    Frances Elaine Newton was 21 when she murdered her husband, 7-year-old son and 2-year-old daughter in Houston, Texas. Update: Frances Elaine Newton was executed on September 14, 2005. (Again does not count, obviously different motivation here.)

    Darlie Lynn Routier was 26 in Rowlett, Texas when she was convicted of killing her 5-year-old son. (8)

    Teresa Michelle Lewis killer her 51-year-old husband and 26-year-old step son in Keeling, Virgina when she was 33 years old. (Does not count not even hers and look at the ages.)

    Korbin says there are usually clues that are obvious to those around parents who end up killing their children. "Prior to a homicide, lots of lay people know these men and women are having difficulty parenting. The public has to be better educated in recognizing how to intervene and how to support child abuse prevention," she said in an AAA press release.
    I doubt this is the way to educate people.

    So out of all those 200 murdering women 8 of them in the United States are note worthy and in jail. 8 women in the whole united states which breeds all day long.

    This IS rare and shocking. These women are fucked up in the head, it is not normal, or common, nor should it be made to look like a common occurrence. That's all we need a bunch of people thinking it is cool or they will get attention from killing their children.

    Quote Originally Posted by ICUP View Post
    i just thought the statistics were interesting to see. 200 women a year kill their children..... that's kindof nasty to think about.
    I am not sure that is entirely accurate.

  3. #113
    Senior Member ICUP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatGirl View Post
    I doubt this is the way to educate people.

    So out of all those 200 murdering women 8 of them in the United States are note worthy and in jail. 8 women in the whole united states which breeds all day long.

    This IS rare and shocking. These women are fucked up in the head, it is not normal, or common, nor should it be made to look like a common occurrence. That's all we need a bunch of people thinking it is cool or they will get attention from killing their children.



    I am not sure that is entirely accurate.


    http://www.bet.com/news/national/201...each-year.html

    There is the same article .... I saw the other one in passing when I was researching people who kill their children. I'm not sure how accurate it is. I just take it for what it is.... it could be true to me, but an estimate is better than nothing. I'm not necessarily trying to educate people, just sharing information lol.....
    I don't think it's common either, but I don't have to completely agree with anyone's opinion to gain something from the article. It doesn't say it's common, just "more common than we might think." I look at the information objectively initially, so it's not always obvious a meaning it could infer. (Plus, I'm not social, so .... I personally just see it more as an article, and the statistics and examples stand out to me a lot more than the slant).

    I get your point about the way people will read it, and they will gather a meaning that wasn't there. I'm a lot more interested in trying to figure out what the truth is than whether it's going to cause a social effect. I think we have different interests.
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  4. #114
    ThatGirl
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICUP View Post
    http://www.bet.com/news/national/201...each-year.html

    There is the same article .... I saw the other one in passing when I was researching people who kill their children. I'm not sure how accurate it is. I just take it for what it is.... it could be true to me, but an estimate is better than nothing. I'm not necessarily trying to educate people, just sharing information lol.....
    I don't think it's common either, but I don't have to completely agree with anyone's opinion to gain something from the article. It doesn't say it's common, just "more common than we might think." I look at the information objectively initially, so it's not always obvious a meaning it could infer. (Plus, I'm not social, so .... I personally just see it more as an article, and the statistics and examples stand out to me a lot more than the slant).

    I get your point about the way people will read it, and they will gather a meaning that wasn't there. I'm a lot more interested in trying to figure out what the truth is than whether it's going to cause a social effect. I think we have different interests.
    Sorry, I wasn't debating you specifically, I just have a zero understanding/tolerance policy for people who hurt children.

  5. #115
    Senior Member ICUP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatGirl View Post
    Sorry, I wasn't debating you specifically, I just have a zero understanding/tolerance policy for people who hurt children.
    I think i understand. No problems on my end at all.
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  6. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatGirl View Post
    This IS rare and shocking. These women are fucked up in the head, it is not normal, or common, nor should it be made to look like a common occurrence.
    You are right. 4 million babies are born each year in the USA, and if that 200 per year figure is accurate, that is 1 in every 20,000 children. By comparison, 7,000 children die of SIDS each year.
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  7. #117
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    People have different conceptions of justice. For some, justice means that the guilty are punished. For others, justice means that the outcome does not matter, as long as everyone goes through the same process. For others more, justice means that the system addresses and balances the inequity in society. And for even others, justice means that each decision serves a greater societal purpose.

    Some people will think it fundamentally unjust that the jury acquitted Anthony. Others will think that the decision was fundamentally just. Neither are right or wrong, but the former tend to be comfortable with punishing innocents to ensure that we punish all that are guilty, while the latter tend to be comfortable with letting some of the guilty go unpunished lest we punish anyone innocent.

    It's the fundamental question of society.

  8. #118
    Senior Member ICUP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    People have different conceptions of justice. For some, justice means that the guilty are punished. For others, justice means that the outcome does not matter, as long as everyone goes through the same process. For others more, justice means that the system addresses and balances the inequity in society. And for even others, justice means that each decision serves a greater societal purpose.

    Some people will think it fundamentally unjust that the jury acquitted Anthony. Others will think that the decision was fundamentally just. Neither are right or wrong, but the former tend to be comfortable with punishing innocents to ensure that we punish all that are guilty, while the latter tend to be comfortable with letting some of the guilty go unpunished lest we punish anyone innocent.
    Agree.
    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    It's the fundamental question of society.
    Why?
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  9. #119
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICUP View Post
    Why?
    These are the sorts of perspectives that determine whether people are comfortable with trusting strangers.

  10. #120
    Senior Member ubiquitous1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    For others more, justice means that the system addresses and balances the inequity in society.
    From my perspective,the law enforcers/judicial system, at the level most people deal with, exacerbate societal inequities.

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