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  1. #1
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    Default Bonnie Scotland Discussion Thread



    Since we seem to be on our way to an independence referendum in Scotland in a few years time I thought it would be a nice idea to have a thread where you can discuss everything Scottish.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt
    [A] notion has been entertained that the moral spine in Scotland is more flexible than in England. The truth however is, that an elementary difference exists in the public feelings of the two nations quite as great as in the idioms of their respective dialects. The English are a justice-loving people, according to charter and statute; the Scotch are a wrong-resenting race, according to right and feeling: and the character of liberty among them takes its aspect from that peculiarity.
    Remember, if it's not Scottish IT'S CRAP.

    Ask away and myself and any other budding Scots will attempt to answer your wee or mental queries in depth.

    Warning, topics which can flip into 'Serious Business' include but are not limited to:
    • It's Scotlands Oil
    • Alcohol
    • British or Scottish?
    • Scottish Inventions
    • Which fitba team?

  2. #2
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    If Scotland did declare independence what models of government have been proposed to succeed the current one? Would Scotland become a Commonwealth realm, where Queen Elizabeth would remain as a legally distinct Queen of Scotland and the Scottish parliament would operate in much the same way the one in Westminster does? Or would it ditch the monarchy and become a republic, like Ireland did? Which would you prefer?

    And what happens with the EU? Would Scotland stay in the EU; do the Scottish people on the whole want to be a part of the EU? What do you personally think about it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 93JC View Post
    If Scotland did declare independence what models of government have been proposed to succeed the current one? Would Scotland become a Commonwealth realm, where Queen Elizabeth would remain as a legally distinct Queen of Scotland and the Scottish parliament would operate in much the same way the one in Westminster does? Or would it ditch the monarchy and become a republic, like Ireland did? Which would you prefer?

    And what happens with the EU? Would Scotland stay in the EU; do the Scottish people on the whole want to be a part of the EU? What do you personally think about it?
    It appears we are in for a referendum which has the following questions:

    1) Full Independence
    2) Full Fiscal Autonomy, Federalised
    3) Status Quo

    Personally I'm pro-independence, but I'd happily settle for proper fiscal autonomy and federalism which I think is more close to the consensus viewpoint of the country as an average.

    Regarding the model of government, the Scottish Parliament is unicamerical (1 chamber), I guess this would have to be expanded for the usual democratic checks and balances.

    It is commonly held that the Queen would stay, although many Scottish people are republican, I'm not and I'm not really aware of any polling that has been performed regarding this. In truth of course the Queen has zero power in the UK apart from ceremonial signature use and novelty teaset generating events and the crown estates providing a tidy £2.38 identifiable yearly tax rebate.

    EU is an odd topic because although polls suggest that generally the Scottish people are more 'pro-EU' than 'anti-EU' I don't think there has been a serious discussion about it. Many people are pro-EU but view the current relationship between Scotland and the EU not to be in the interests of Scotland (somewhat akin to the UK as a whole).

    I'm much more in favour of a Scandanavian style 'Pick and Choose' EU relationship, although I think most people in the UK are. At the moment it seems Scotland is steering a lot of the more forward looking political debate in the UK, so perhaps if Scotland becomes much more 'Pick and Choose' towards the EU, then the rUK (rest of UK) will follow suit.

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    I'm afraid I don't know much about the Scots. But I have to say that significant Scottish representation has bumped Doctor Who up several notches in quality.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlippoth View Post
    I'm afraid I don't know much about the Scots. But I have to say that significant Scottish representation has bumped Doctor Who up several notches in quality.
    Dr. Who is brilliant, David Tennant is also brilliant. You should be aware that it's production and filming is primarily in Cardiff, Wales. *thumbs up*

    Lots of people have been moaning the new doctor is bad; to be fair, he isn't terrible, sure he ain't David Tennant, but the episodes about the Silence were cool.

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    Quote Originally Posted by InvisibleJim View Post
    Dr. Who is brilliant, David Tennant is also brilliant. You should be aware that it's production and filming is primarily in Cardiff, Wales. *thumbs up*

    Lots of people have been moaning the new doctor is bad; to be fair, he isn't terrible, sure he ain't David Tennant, but the episodes about the Silence were cool.
    Actually I like Matt Smith a bit more, but it probably has something to do with the fact that I like Moffat's writing better. And it doesn't hurt the show that Amy Pond is more than a pretty face, but is a pretty face none the less.

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    I want to know about inventions please...



    also cute thread
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

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    Quote Originally Posted by GemPOPGem View Post
    I want to know about inventions please...



    also cute thread
    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottis...nd_discoveries

    Road and Transport Innovations

    Macadamised roads (the basis for, but not specifically, Tarmac): John Loudon McAdam (1756–1836)[3]
    The pedal bicycle: Attributed to both Kirkpatrick Macmillan (1813–1878) and Thomas McCall (1834–1904)
    The pneumatic tyre: Robert William Thomson and John Boyd Dunlop (1822–1873)
    The overhead valve engine: David Dunbar Buick (1854–1929)

    Civil Engineering Innovations

    Tubular steel: Sir William Fairbairn (1789–1874)
    Falkirk Wheel: Initial designs by Nicoll Russell Studios, Architects and engineers Binnie Black and Veatch (Opened 2002)
    The patent slip for docking vessels: Thomas Morton (1781–1832)
    The Drummond Light: Thomas Drummond (1797–1840)
    Canal design: Thomas Telford (1757–1834)
    Dock design improvements: John Rennie (1761–1821)
    Crane design improvements: James Bremner (1784–1856)

    Aviation Innovations
    Aircraft design: Frank Barnwell (1910) Establishing the fundamentals of aircraft design at the University of Glasgow.

    Power Innovations
    Condensing steam engine improvements: James Watt (1736–1819)
    Coal-gas lighting: William Murdoch (1754–1839)
    The Stirling heat engine: Rev. Robert Stirling (1790–1878)
    Carbon brushes for dynamos: George Forbes (1849–1936)
    The Clerk cycle gas engine: Sir Dugald Clerk (1854–1932)
    Cloud chamber recording of atoms: Charles T. R. Wilson (1869–1959)
    Wave-powered electricity generator:By South African Engineer Stephen Salter in 1977

    Shipbuilding Innovations
    Europe's first passenger steamboat: Henry Bell (1767–1830)
    The first iron-hulled steamship: Sir William Fairbairn (1789–1874)
    The first practical screw propeller: Robert Wilson (1803–1882)
    Marine engine innovations: James Howden (1832–1913)
    John Elder & Charles Randolph (Marine Compound expansion engine)

    Military Innovations
    Field intelligence Lieutenant David Henderson Field Intelligence: Its Principles and Practice (1904) and Reconnaissance (1907) on the tactical intelligence of modern warfare during World War I.

    Heavy Industry Innovations
    Coal mining extraction in the sea on an artificial island by Sir George Bruce of Carnock (1575). Regarded as one of the industrial wonders of the late medieval period.
    Making cast steel from wrought iron: David Mushet (1772–1847)
    Wrought iron sash bars for glass houses: John C. Loudon (1783–1865)
    The hot blast oven: James Beaumont Neilson (1792–1865)
    The steam hammer: James Nasmyth (1808–1890)
    Wire rope: Robert Stirling Newall (1812–1889)
    Steam engine improvements: William Mcnaught (1831–1881)
    The Fairlie, a narrow gauge, double-bogie railway engine: Robert Francis Fairlie (1831–1885)
    Cordite - Sir James Dewar, Sir Frederick Abel (1889)

    Agricultural Innovations
    Threshing machine improvements: James Meikle (c.1690-c.1780) & Andrew Meikle (1719–1811)
    Hollow pipe drainage: Sir Hew Dalrymple, Lord Drummore (1700–1753)
    The Scotch Plough: James Anderson of Hermiston (1739–1808)
    Deanstonisation soil-drainage system: James Smith (1789–1850)
    The mechanical reaping machine: Rev. Patrick Bell (1799–1869)
    The Fresno Scraper: James Porteous (1848–1922)
    The Tuley tree shelter: Graham Tuley in 1979

    Communication Inventions
    Print stereotyping: William Ged (1690–1749)
    Roller printing: Thomas Bell (patented 1783)
    The adhesive postage stamp and the postmark: James Chalmers (1782–1853)
    Universal Standard Time: Sir Sandford Fleming (1827–1915)
    Light signalling between ships: Admiral Philip H. Colomb (1831–1899)
    The telephone: Alexander Graham Bell (1847–1922)
    The teleprinter: Frederick G. Creed (1871–1957)
    The first working television, and colour television; John Logie Baird (1888–1946)
    Radar: Robert Watson-Watt (1892–1973)
    The underlying principles of Radio - James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879)

    Publishing Firsts
    The first edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1768–81)
    The first English textbook on surgery(1597)
    The first modern pharmacopaedia, William Cullen (1776) The book became 'Europe’s principal text on the classification and treatment of disease'
    his ideas survive in the terms nervous energy and neuroses (a word that Cullen coined).
    The first postcards and picture postcards in the UK

    Scientific Innovations
    Logarithms: John Napier (1550–1617)
    The theory of electromagnetism: James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879)
    Popularising the decimal point: John Napier (1550–1617)
    The Gregorian telescope: James Gregory (1638–1675)
    The concept of latent heat: Joseph Black (1728–1799)
    The pyroscope, atmometer and aethrioscope scientific instruments: Sir John Leslie (1766–1832)
    Identifying the nucleus in living cells: Robert Brown (1773–1858)
    Hypnotism: James Braid (1795–1860)
    Transplant rejection: Professor Thomas Gibson (1940s) the first medical doctor to understand the relationship between donor graft tissue and host tissue rejection and tissue transplantation by his work on aviation burns victims during World War II.
    Colloid chemistry: Thomas Graham (1805–1869)
    The kelvin SI unit of temperature: William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824–1907)
    Devising the diagramatic system of representing chemical bonds: Alexander Crum Brown (1838–1922)
    Criminal fingerprinting: Henry Faulds (1843–1930)
    The noble gases: Sir William Ramsay (1852–1916)
    The Cloud chamber: Charles Thomson Rees Wilson (1869–1959)
    Pioneering work on nutrition and poverty: John Boyd Orr (1880–1971)
    The ultrasound scanner: Ian Donald (1910–1987)
    Ferrocene synthetic substances: Peter Ludwig Pauson in 1955
    The MRI body scanner: John Mallard and James Huchinson from (1974–1980)
    The first cloned mammal (Dolly the Sheep): Was conducted in The Roslin Institute research centre in 1996
    Seismometer innovations thereof: James David Forbes
    Metaflex fabric innovations thereof: University of St. Andrews (2010) application of the first manufacturing fabrics that manipulate light in bending it around a subject. Before this such light manipulating atoms were fixed on flat hard surfaces. The team at St Andrews are the first to develop the concept to fabric.
    Macaulayite: Dr. Jeff Wilson of the Macaulay Institute, Aberdeen.

    Sports Innovations
    several modern athletics events, i.e. shot put and the hammer throw, derive from Highland Games and earlier 12th century Scotland
    Curling
    Cycling, invention of the pedal-cycle
    Golf (see Golf in Scotland)
    Shinty The history of Shinty as a non-standardised sport pre-dates Scotland the Nation. The rules were standardised in the 19th century by Archibald Chisholm
    Rugby sevens: Ned Haig and David Sanderson (1883)

    Medical Innovations
    Pioneering the use of surgical anaesthesia with Chloroform: Sir James Young Simpson (1811–1870)
    The hypodermic syringe: Alexander Wood (1817–1884)
    Discovery of hypnotism (November 1841): James Braid (1795-1860)
    Identifying the mosquito as the carrier of malaria: Sir Ronald Ross (1857–1932)
    Identifying the cause of brucellosis: Sir David Bruce (1855–1931)
    Discovering the vaccine for typhoid fever: Sir William B. Leishman (1865–1926)
    Discovering insulin: John J R Macleod (1876–1935) with others
    Penicillin: Sir Alexander Fleming (1881–1955)
    Ambulight PDT: light-emitting sticking plaster used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating non-melanoma skin cancer. Developed by Ambicare Dundee's Ninewells Hospital and St Andrews University. (2010)
    Discovering an effective tuberculosis treatment: Sir John Crofton in the 1950s
    Primary creator of the artificial kidney (Professor Kenneth Lowe - Later Queen's physician in Scotland)
    Developing the first beta-blocker drugs: Sir James W. Black in 1964
    Glasgow Coma Scale: Graham Teasdale and Bryan J. Jennett (1974)
    EKG [Electrocardiography]: Alexander Muirhead (1911)


    Household Innovations
    The Refrigerator: William Cullen (1748)
    The Flush toilet: Alexander Cummings (1775)
    The Dewar Flask: Sir James Dewar (1847–1932)
    The first distiller to triple distill Irish whiskey:John Jameson (Whisky distiller)
    The piano footpedal: John Broadwood (1732–1812)
    The first automated can-filing machine John West (1809–1888)
    The waterproof macintosh: Charles Macintosh (1766–1843)
    The kaleidoscope: Sir David Brewster (1781–1868)
    Keiller's marmalade Janet Keiller (1797) - The first recipe of rind suspended marmalade or Dundee marmalade produced in Dundee.
    The modern lawnmower: Alexander Shanks (1801–1845)
    The Lucifer friction match: Sir Isaac Holden (1807–1897)
    The self filling pen: Robert Thomson (1822–1873)
    Cotton-reel thread: J & J Clark of Paisley
    Lime Cordial: Peter Burnett in 1867
    Freeze-tolerant solar heating: Kerr MacGregor commercialised in 1999 as Solartwin
    Bovril beef extract: John Lawson Johnston in 1874
    Electric clock: Alexander Bain (1840)
    Chemical Telegraph (Automatic Telegraphy) Alexander Bain (1846) In England Bain's telegraph was used on the wires of the Electric Telegraph Company to a limited extent, and in 1850 it was used in America.

    Weapons Innovations
    The carronade cannon: Robert Melville (1723–1809)
    The Ferguson rifle: Patrick Ferguson in 1770 or 1776
    The Lee bolt system as used in the Lee-Metford and Lee-Enfield series rifles: James Paris Lee
    The Ghillie suit
    The Percussion Cap: invented by Scottish Presbyterian clergyman Alexander Forsyth

    Miscellaneous Inventions
    Boys' Brigade
    Royal Air Force: Lieutenant David Henderson considered instrumental in the foundation of the British Royal Air Force.
    Bank of England devised by William Paterson
    Bank of France devised by John Law
    Colour photography: the first known permanent colour photograph was taken by James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879)
    University constituency

  9. #9

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    Scottish women are the most attractive women in the whole god damned world.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by InvisibleJim View Post


    Warning, topics which can flip into 'Serious Business' include but are not limited to:
    • British or Scottish?
    Okay...

    British or Scottish?*

    More to the point (as you have already answered that question), why? Do you lack significant non-Scot British ancestry? Do you feel some massive cultural gap between Scotland and the rest of the UK? Do you feel unable to identify as a Scot and a Brit at the same time (and if so, why)? Is it primarily a matter of left-wing fiscal preferences relative to England, combined with an absence of strong national identifaction either way? And how would you feel about residents of Scotland who would choose to secede frome an independent Scotland and join the UK?

    *And if you're going to make a big deal out of it...then don't call all Americans 'Yanks'.

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