User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 35

  1. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    He's a mix of Samson and a golem (Shuster and Siegel were Jewish, after all). That's also where the inclination toward hard work and identification with the values of one's group came from.

  2. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lowtech redneck View Post
    I said that the changes were made to appeal to anti-American sentiment, not that the result was anti-American in itself: I'm referring to the deletion of G.I.Joe as the 'Real American Hero' and of Superman fighting for 'the American way'. Basically, the elimination of well-known properties as celebratory representations of American ideals, however idealized.
    That is a shame, I didnt notice that so much, I thought that the GI Joe movie went on for too long and it reminded me of another ill fated movie of the same special effects genre, it was about some sort of super computer called over mind and a group resisting it, there were two or three big robots, one was like a terradactyle and flew another a kind of big bruiser monster thing. Wish I could remember the name.

    I knew about the phrase being expunged in the Superman Returns movie, to be honest its a shame, although in some ways its understandable, given what "Americanism" came to mean at home and abroad around about the time those films were filmed. I didnt like it and I'm a one time "anti-american" but got tired of over simplified appraisals of geo-politics.

  3. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ignite View Post
    I never cared for Superman anyway.

    I was always a bigger Batman fan but reading Whatever Happened To The Man of Tommorrow? A hypthetical final issue of Superman which was in part an Alan Moore work, made me rethink that. Probably Smallville too.

    Batman has been savagely attacked as an Ayn Rand uber mensch sadistically preying upon poor criminals and creating the culture in which freak show psychos can thrive, at least in the UK. It something I hate about the UK, it demonstrates unheard of propensities to trash heroes.

  4. #24
    Senior Member knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    MBTI
    entp
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    409

    Default

    batman always pulls off the same grand things with out the super powers and near invincibility of superman. for batman to rush into a fight, the risks are greater then if superman ever done it. so as a kid, I had liked batman more as well for that

  5. #25
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    Superman is based more on more Greek notions of heroism. Most comic book heroes are.

    Ubermenschen (Nietszchean or otherwise) are about strength of will and self-referential morality. Entirely different. If there's one character inspired by it from the same time Superman was created, it's Robert E Howard's Conan.

  6. #26
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    I'm not really surprised at the expansion of Superman to dis-identify as American, since really it was just a matter of luck that he crashed in the heartland of the US, whereas really he's just an orphan from another world. He could have easily been landed and raised somewhere else. He seems to fight for more abstracted broad values though, that encompass all of humanity rather than the needs of just one country -- a true "philanthropist."

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I was always a bigger Batman fan but reading Whatever Happened To The Man of Tommorrow? A hypthetical final issue of Superman which was in part an Alan Moore work, made me rethink that.
    Alan Moore:

    He typically gives some human elements to the characters he writes. Superman has at times been badly in need of such treatment. Another great Moore Supes story (w/ Dave "Watchmen" Gibbons art):
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/For_the...Has_Everything

    I actually found Miller's version of Superman in TDKR to be sympathetic, despite Batman's feelings toward him -- he was a nice and reasonable balance to Bats.

    Batman has been savagely attacked as an Ayn Rand uber mensch sadistically preying upon poor criminals and creating the culture in which freak show psychos can thrive, at least in the UK. It something I hate about the UK, it demonstrates unheard of propensities to trash heroes.
    I wouldn't know anything about the UK.
    Bats has some heavy personal issues, but he still has a niche to fill.
    We deconstruct things in the US as well, but I don't think Bats was ever on a pedestal as Superman was, he was already pretty dark and thus became one more "anti-hero" in our slew of mavericks outside the law that we popularize in our movies and books.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  7. #27
    Senior Member knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    MBTI
    entp
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    409

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    Superman is based more on more Greek notions of heroism. Most comic book heroes are.

    Ubermenschen (Nietszchean or otherwise) are about strength of will and self-referential morality. Entirely different. If there's one character inspired by it from the same time Superman was created, it's Robert E Howard's Conan.
    ok but have`nt you ever had a desire when you heard something wrong to have wished to been able to do more? it can have been birthed out of that desire to being more or doing more

    imagination is an influence

  8. #28
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by knight View Post
    ok but have`nt you ever had a desire when you heard something wrong to have wished to been able to do more? it can have been birthed out of that desire to being more or doing more

    imagination is an influence
    Yeah, but I do it out of an existing set of principles that I've considered greater than myself or beneficial to more than just me. So does Superman. Not sheer desire or some kind of experimental ontology.

  9. #29
    Senior Member knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    MBTI
    entp
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    409

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    Yeah, but I do it out of an existing set of principles that I've considered greater than myself or beneficial to more than just me. So does Superman. Not sheer desire or some kind of experimental ontology.
    really, i dont consider myself any different then anyone but I do remember seeing my dad as a strong person, this from a kids perspective and wishing i had his strength before i became aware of super heroes as well. so no set principles there influenced my imagination other then my dad. I also dreamed of invisibility as well. its imagination.

  10. #30
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by knight View Post
    really, i dont consider myself any different then anyone but I do remember seeing my dad as a strong person, this from a kids perspective and wishing i had his strength before i became aware of super heroes as well. so no set principles there influenced my imagination other then my dad. I also dreamed of invisibility as well. its imagination.
    Oh wait.. I thought you were saying Superman was inspired by Nietzsche. You're saying imagination... yes, of course! =) But I'm also saying it has precedent in older myths and hero tales.. as far as literature goes. The DC universe especially tapped into it. Marvel did it to an extent, but Stan Lee emphasized an angle on freak accidents and such.. more inspired by Wolfman and Jekyl and Hyde stories.

Similar Threads

  1. [Socionics] Cognitive functions in actions- Bizzare video
    By great_bay in forum Socionics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-30-2016, 01:55 PM
  2. IXFP Is this Ni or Ne in action ?
    By j colour in forum What's my Type?
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-06-2015, 12:37 PM
  3. Functions in Action
    By skylights in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-05-2012, 02:00 AM
  4. Values in Action
    By Glycerine in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-17-2011, 08:35 PM
  5. Fictional examples of sensing and intuition in action
    By proteanmix in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 11-30-2010, 04:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO