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  1. #11
    The Eighth Colour Octarine's Avatar
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    I'm not sure if seven is the right age, but I would have gotten plastic surgery in that particular case too. Asymmetry is a big deal in terms of human cognition of aesthetic beauty.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Eckhart's Avatar
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    Children can be like monsters when it comes to bullying. I can see how parents of bullied children can feel quite helpless in such situations; after all you can only help your child dealing with the problems as good as you can, but you cannot discipline other children to really prevent it. Teachers seem overchallenged with such cases.

    I don't know if plastic surgery is the right step, especially in that case. With 7 years I believe children are not yet that harsh in bullying, it comes usually later on. Who knows if it would really have caused so much problems later? She looked actually quite normal to me, and there would have been chances to just live normal without it.

    Usually you would think society should have been already before enough alerted about bullying being a HUGE problem, but when 7 year old children take already plastic surgeries to avoid bullying and there still are no steps taken to deal with those issues, I don't know what has to happen anymore.

  3. #13
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    Her ears were adorable. She's a cute kid, but I don't think she'll regret having surgery. I had a friend have her ears pinned back at uni. They quite possibly wouldn't look so cute when she's older, and hey, every girl likes to put thier hair up.
    If you can fix it without too much trauma, why let your kid go through unnecessary teasing? No matter what people say, being bullied does not make you stronger.
    Here in Australia, they are looking at making work place bullying a crime, that can get you up to ten years jail, as a result of a particular case where a young woman commited suicide because of bullying at her work place (I do believe there were elements of sexual harrasment as well).
    Plus there have been several kids in different schools that have commited suicide in the last couple of years, due to school yard bullying....I'm not talking a few harsh words here or there, I'm talking about mobbing and having the crap beaten out of them on a regular basis. Makes my experience with school bullies pale in comparison.
    Maybe mom in the vid was terrified of that happening to her kid.
    I agree with everyone though, what hell has gone wrong with society that this has gotten so out of hand?
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
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  4. #14
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    As long as you don't give a child plastic surgery so that she can be a famous actor/actress/singer one day.... don't really have a problem in this case.

    Other than that, move my hypothetical kid into a smaller school/private school/home schooled depending on the "severity"/case. Or if it is just bullying in general (an a-hole who just like picking on other people) I'll just move my kid into another school. If the kid wants to stay in the same school... I'll probably demand some type of action... within the schools part.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    Sounds to me like this is more of an issue with the mother, than the child. Bet if you dig deeply enough, her mother was teased.

    As far as Samantha's ears are concerned, they didn't look that bad to me and most of the time, she had her short hair covering them so no one would have noticed.
    Yes, I agree.

    I would still fix the symmetry, if I see my child is extremely affected by it.

    To me, it seemed that the child didn't care as much as the mother did.

  6. #16
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YWIR View Post
    Yes, I agree.

    I would still fix the symmetry, if I see my child is extremely affected by it.

    To me, it seemed that the child didn't care as much as the mother did.
    That's exactly it. When they asked the child, she didn't recall any bullying or teasing. When they asked the mother, she mentioned other adults making comments.

    The little girl seemed pretty well adjusted. She's so cute and has that pixie look about her, including her ears.

    I also wonder why this little girl was selected for pro-bono plastic surgery, since there are other children who have drastic disfigurements that needed it. Something tells me that it was done because she was so cute and would make a great example for the solicitation of more business.

    "Out of the goodness of our hearts, look at the wonderful job we did on this adorable little girl. You too, parent, can rid your child of future bullying possibilities. Just dial 1-900-Cutemup and we will protect your child".

  7. #17
    figsfiggyfigs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    That's exactly it. When they asked the child, she didn't recall any bullying or teasing. When they asked the mother, she mentioned other adults making comments.

    The little girl seemed pretty well adjusted. She's so cute and has that pixie look about her, including her ears.

    I also wonder why this little girl was selected for pro-bono plastic surgery, since there are other children who have drastic disfigurements that needed it. Something tells me that it was done because she was so cute and would make a great example for the solicitation of more business.

    "Out of the goodness of our hearts, look at the wonderful job we did on this adorable little girl. You too, parent, can rid your child of future bullying possibilities. Just dial 1-900-Cutemup and we will protect your child".
    You've summed up my thoughts on the entire thing as well. I was wondering the same thing regarding the pro-bono--" Her??". It's definitely because she's adorable, and was a PR opportunity for the business.
    Last edited by figsfiggyfigs; 04-16-2011 at 02:18 PM. Reason: quoted AD >: D

  8. #18
    Phantonym
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    To what extent would you go to to prevent bullying for your children? (Or hypothetical children if you don't have any.)
    Do you think the mother is justified in her reasoning? The little girl seemed to be okay with it now.. would she regret this decision later in life?
    If you find this all okay.. where would you draw the line when it comes to preventing bullying, and teaching your child and children around yours self-acceptance?
    Well, considering this particular girl and her ears, I don't see it being any different from getting a cleft lip and palate fixed as it is a deformity. With defects such as this, how on earth are you supposed to teach them self-acceptance? Considering the obsession about appearances I think I would definitely take major efforts in making sure that my children would at least be knowledgeable about things and accepting towards themselves and others around them. There will always be something to worry about anyway. However, promoting needless plastic surgery and giving signals that this is the way to go with fixing things is not okay.

    I don't think the girl would regret it later on. As she wasn't badly bullied yet, she hasn't probably formed negative associations with it that probably would have happened when she got older, so she just has no idea about it later on. But when she becomes obsessed about her appearances due to this in the future, at least she can pinpoint where it all started with her therapist.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eckhart View Post
    With 7 years I believe children are not yet that harsh in bullying, it comes usually later on. Who knows if it would really have caused so much problems later?
    I hate to break it to you but that's a bit naive. Bullying is bullying no matter how harsh it is or what age groups are involved. I was bullied in kindergarten when I was 4-5 years old and that was a good 25 years ago, I bet things haven't gotten any better during that time for anybody. People point at others for whatever they regard as worth pointing at. There are 5-year old children who suffer from anorexia, that's how bad things have gotten with the obsession with appearances. But that's true, nobody knows if it would have caused problems. But as this is something that so clearly sticks out, chances of having positive experiences are quite frankly slim to none.

  9. #19
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    I was all prepared to be outraged, but that actually sounds fairly reasonable, even if I'd personally have waited a few years to do it. Why, I'm not sure. Hopefully surgery is advanced enough these days that there won't be complications from doing it so young....I'm assuming it's done under general anaesthesia too, which can have serious side effects including rarely, death. So it's maybe a bit early for the girl to give informed consent IMO but I don't think it's a huge deal and it is a reasonable rationale. It's not like that crazy 9-year old on botox etc.

    The pro-bono sounds bizarre but if I'm understanding correctly, the money was given by a foundation specifically for these minor cosmetic changes, so it's not like money is being diverted from burn victims or anything (?). Some charities give money to arguably silly causes, but if people donate money to the cause...should we really be judging them for that?
    -end of thread-

  10. #20
    Senior Member Eckhart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phantonym View Post
    I hate to break it to you but that's a bit naive. Bullying is bullying no matter how harsh it is or what age groups are involved. I was bullied in kindergarten when I was 4-5 years old and that was a good 25 years ago, I bet things haven't gotten any better during that time for anybody. People point at others for whatever they regard as worth pointing at. There are 5-year old children who suffer from anorexia, that's how bad things have gotten with the obsession with appearances. But that's true, nobody knows if it would have caused problems. But as this is something that so clearly sticks out, chances of having positive experiences are quite frankly slim to none.
    Oh, well, thanks for enlightening me about this. I really didn't notice much of that going on in those early years really, I was always under the impression this starts a bit later on. That makes me feel even more terrible about this issue. Bullying is really a topic which I feel strongly about; I mean, I have felt it in some time myself to some degree, but I saw people who really had it way worse than me in that regard and it was horrible to see. It can really mess up the life of a victim of those attacks.

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